Mesh WiFi vs. Wireless Router

Online now: ukimalefu
Post Reply
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
User avatar
Is there any difference really? Is there a reason I should consider converting my lone Linksys wireless router household to a mesh system?

We're running on four laptops (MacBooks and ChromeBooks), three Apple TVs, a few HomeKit devices, Philips Hue lights, and and an Arlo camera system. We're not currently experiencing any connectivity issues.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
User avatar
Mesh routers are a vast improvement if you have dead spots in your house. For us, it meant the difference between the bedrooms getting zero signal and getting nearly full signal.

However, if you aren't having connectivity issues, then no, they don't really help. Worse, since they use part of their bandwidth for the backhaul, they can actually hurt.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
User avatar
If you don't have any problems, don't change anything

If it ain't broke, don't fix it

The mesh is supposed to help you extend coverage if you it. I don't know if there are other advantages.

There's also some routers with like 6 or 8 antennas that look like alien robot spiders that are supposed to be better than your average wifi router, but I really don't know if they are. One advantage those have is setting up a separate (that is usually slower) network for guests, so you don't have to give them your wifi password.
macnuke Afar
User avatar
as they say..
if it ain't broke. why fixit?

our home has
4 tower type computers. 2 are wired into the network.
5 laptops
3 gaming consoles
2 TVs
4 phones when we are all home.

one Router with wifi.
zero problems.
Lombo Opiofiend
User avatar
Do you have spotty reception like in the garage or the opposite side of your house? If so it might be a good move to switch to a mesh system. Also if you have a lot of interference from neighbours it could help you also. You should get a mesh system that have at least 2 (preferably 3) radios so that both the 2.4 and 5 ghz frequencies gets used for the back haul.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
User avatar
There is one exception - if you are willing to hard-wire the mesh access points. The backhaul is done over gigabit Ethernet, so there is no loss of bandwidth AND it splits the load on the main router's WiFi connection. Of course, this assumes your devices will be used far enough apart to matter, but that use case can improve performance a fair bit if you have a lot of WiFi devices.

I did that with our house, and it immediately made a big difference. The devices in the back end of the house now perform as well as the stuff right next to the router.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
User avatar
Most of my devices are wired to ethernet, with only my phone and tablet on wi-fi. I ended up buying a small switch to split the network cable in my bedroom to my two towers and TV.
Subsequent topic  /  Preceding topic
Post Reply

Mesh WiFi vs. Wireless Router