Microsoft had underwater servers?

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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Yes, they did, and they took it out of the water now

https://gizmodo.com/microsofts-underwat ... 1845058639

Quote:
Microsoft’s underwater Northern Isles data center has risen again from the ocean depth, the company announced on Monday, and it is remarkably intact other than being covered in sea scum.

Quote:
That vindicates the hypothesis the seafloor is preferable for server farms to topside environments where gear can be damaged by corrosion from oxygen and humidity, constant temperature changes, and physical movement during maintenance. Putting data centers underwater may also enable closer placement to customers and obviously makes cooling far easier, and Microsoft has previously suggested they could be powered by tidal generators. The units are also portable and could be easily scaled into larger operations.


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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Nifty idea, but you had better hope you don't need to service very many of the servers. Although, according to the article, they only lost a handful of them over the life of the experiment - better than a land-based data center.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Tidal generators, that's what I'm talking about. People who dismiss this fail to understand that it's only a matter of imagination to solve relatively simple physics issues.
macnuke Afar
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so which is worse?
the heat generated from a server farm on the land?
the heat generated from a server farm in the ocean/lake?
sean Royal Wombat
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I remember when they started this experiment. I was fairly sure the thing was gonna leak, and they were going to end up with a bunch of wet and salty servers.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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sean posted:
I remember when they started this experiment. I was fairly sure the thing was gonna leak, and they were going to end up with a bunch of wet and salty servers.


I never figured it would leak, but I did imagine it might lose power or connectivity in a storm. We have been putting stuff under water like that for a long time, and it was pressurized with nitrogen gas. However, that umbilical seems awfully small compared to the size of the tube.
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Microsoft had underwater servers?