TVs as monitors

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Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Given the cost of 4K monitors, is there any reason why I should not consider purchasing a 4K tv and using that as my monitor instead? What's the smallest screen size 4k can come?
Work bought me a couple of these for testing stuff. eventually need a couple more...but they are decent.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07LB ... UTF8&psc=1

I would not do anything that needs strict color accuracy on them, but they do look good.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Color accuracy and 60Hz not good enough for you...that's all I can think of.
dv
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One of the neighbors uses what looks like a 55" for his computer screen. Can see it when we walk by - he sits real close to it too.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I noticed my bank uses tv monitors for computer screens. I can tell by the variety of inputs on the back.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I've been using a 1080p Vizio TV as the monitor for my Linux box (previous Hackintosh) for years. It works great, including audio over HDMI.

The ONLY issues I have with it are:
1) TVs boot WAY slower than monitors, presumably due to the added complexity of those TV functions. Of course, I have an older set, so maybe that has improved. As it is, my TV takes about 20-30 seconds before it is ready to respond to input changes,etc.
2) My Vizio TVs have no concept of a recoverable power saving mode. When the PC blanks the screen to initiate it, they just turn off rather than blacking out the screen. You can disable that on the TV, but then it just stays on all the time. This, by itself, wouldn't be terrible, but it also doesn't know how to "wake up" when the computer does. It's really more a matter of inconvenience, and certainly not a show-stopper, but it's worth keeping in mind.

What is ironic is that sending the TV video with black frames WILL put it into a power saving mode. I like to use those black screen rain tracks on Youtube, and after a few minutes, the TV will turn the backlight off but leave the speaker on - which is perfect. Unfortunately, the loss of signal caused by a true power saving mode doesn't have the same affect.

Otherwise, I've used TVs as HDMI monitors for years, and they work perfectly fine.
avkills posted:
Work bought me a couple of these for testing stuff. eventually need a couple more...but they are decent.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07LB ... UTF8&psc=1

I would not do anything that needs strict color accuracy on them, but they do look good.


These are actual monitors by the way and turn on and off very fast. I really have not delved very far into the settings because I am more or less just using them to be able to say "hey look we have signal and it isn't fubar"
I am using a 49” LG 4K tv as a monitor and it works mostly ok. It isn’t as sharp as I would like, but otherwise it is functional.
The upside to TVs is that the integrated audio is usually pretty good nowadays, and the multiple inputs mean you can have a couple devices hooked up to it, with PiP if the TV supports it. The pixel density is usually much lower than computer monitors though, as well as the refresh rate, as it's not meant to be a half meter away from your face.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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yelow posted:
The upside to TVs is that the integrated audio is usually pretty good nowadays, and the multiple inputs mean you can have a couple devices hooked up to it, with PiP if the TV supports it. The pixel density is usually much lower than computer monitors though, as well as the refresh rate, as it's not meant to be a half meter away from your face.


Pixel density is a function of size and resolution. If you get a large enough monitor, it's going to have all the same issues as the same size TV. The difference is that 32" TVs are considered "tiny" while a 32" monitor is considered "huge" for the reason you state.

If you could find a 32" 4K TV, it would be just as crisp as the a computer monitor of the same size. They very often use the same panels with different back-ends.
maurvir posted:
yelow posted:
pixel density

the same panels


yes
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Every tv I have has a "PC" input.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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There is one significant difference that hasn't been mentioned - TV's usually have a lot of video processing designed to enhance TV and movies, and which cause unacceptable lag when gaming. Most TVs will let you turn that off with a special "gaming mode", but you have to remember to disable it.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I used a 32in TV for a monitor and it was fine except it would not power up when I woke my PC. I had to turn it on using the remote I always had close at hand.
Not much of a bother really.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Ok, so I think I've decided against the TV as a monitor route.

I'm now considering an ultra wide, but something I haven't seen addressed is, is it possible to split the screen between two sources at the same time? Can I hook up two laptops (a Windows and a MacBook Pro) and have them display side-by-side to the same ultra wide screen?
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Ok, so I'm seeing that certain Samsungs have "picture-by-picture" and can do what I'm asking.

https://www.samsung.com/us/computing/mo ... 790cns-za/
Robert B. posted:
Ok, so I think I've decided against the TV as a monitor route.

I'm now considering an ultra wide, but something I haven't seen addressed is, is it possible to split the screen between two sources at the same time? Can I hook up two laptops (a Windows and a MacBook Pro) and have them display side-by-side to the same ultra wide screen?


Depends on the model. I just checked with my Dell and yes you can do it. Each input sends out an EDID to be exactly half the horizontal resolution x the max vertical res. So the Dell I have is 3840x1600, so I can run my Mac at 1920x1600 and Windows at 1920x1600. You still have to go into the menu and switch mouse control, so you do not have mouse control over both unless you have separate mice for each system. My particular monitor allows 2 USB upstream connections, so when you switch video inputs, the USB ports on the monitor switch over to the right computer. I had to go into the Nvidia control panel on Windows and turn off the scaling.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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avkills posted:
Robert B. posted:
Ok, so I think I've decided against the TV as a monitor route.

I'm now considering an ultra wide, but something I haven't seen addressed is, is it possible to split the screen between two sources at the same time? Can I hook up two laptops (a Windows and a MacBook Pro) and have them display side-by-side to the same ultra wide screen?


Depends on the model. I just checked with my Dell and yes you can do it. Each input sends out an EDID to be exactly half the horizontal resolution x the max vertical res. So the Dell I have is 3840x1600, so I can run my Mac at 1920x1600 and Windows at 1920x1600. You still have to go into the menu and switch mouse control, so you do not have mouse control over both unless you have separate mice for each system. My particular monitor allows 2 USB upstream connections, so when you switch video inputs, the USB ports on the monitor switch over to the right computer. I had to go into the Nvidia control panel on Windows and turn off the scaling.


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0753P1GTS/?c ... _lig_dp_it
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TVs as monitors