There's something kind of sad...

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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when a VM running on your home computer massively outpaces the dedicated desktop at your office.

When it was new, a long, long time ago, the i7-950 (yes, 1st gen i7) was stupid expensive. I believe the processor alone was $1200 or so, never mind the rest of the computer. Which is why it's been difficult to convince anyone to replace it, despite its age. It has 12GB of DDR3-1666 RAM with a 1TB spinning HDD. (a fast one, but still spinning rust)

At any rate, I've been wanting to setup a VM with all of my Windows based CAD/engineering tools so that I could run them on my Linux computer for hobby work. It's taken about a week to get everything up and running (some of these tools don't like Windows 10, so the VM is running Windows 7), but now it's fully patched and ready.

The base computer is the i7-3770 with 32GB of DDR3 RAM running Mint Linux 19.3. The VM is hosted on the boot SSD, a Samsung 860 Evo Plus attached to a SATA-3 (6gbps) port. I allocated 4 cores (VMware counts this machine as having 8 cores, despite being a 4C/8T CPU) to the VM, and the host system appears to allocate the load pretty evenly across all 8 HT threads. I also gave it 8GB of the 32GB of RAM.

Despite running on top of Linux in VMware, this Windows install curb stomps my office computer. Simulations that take 5-10 minutes at work are practically instantaneous. I was running a series of simulations to figure out why my SDLC interface was failing on certain data patterns and this VM was more or less completing the simulations about as fast as I could hit enter.

So now I am back to begging for a tech refresh at work... :(
ukimalefu last throes
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Look at the bright side: your computer at home is powerful!
I think newer CPUs and their BIOS actually have optimizations for running virtual machines.
I could be mistaken.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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I think virtual Windows has always run pretty fast on intel machines. I remember playing Rune using WINE on my old imac and it was pretty much full speed. The VM just has to make sure all the hardware resources are accessible, and it just runs as-is in its own virtual memory space.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Seems like the "i" series really did not reach ready for prime time until the 3rd generation.
dv
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Pariah posted:
Seems like the "i" series really did not reach ready for prime time until the 3rd generation.


The 2xxx series were as fast as the 3xxx, they just weren't as power efficient - and they were a nice chunk of speed ahead of the first-gen.

But it's probably the hard drive.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Seems like the "i" series really did not reach ready for prime time until the 3rd generation.


The 2xxx series were as fast as the 3xxx, they just weren't as power efficient - and they were a nice chunk of speed ahead of the first-gen.

But it's probably the hard drive.


Yes, it mostly is. While a i7-3770 is a LOT faster than an i7-950, most of my CAD/EDA tools write a lot to the disk. ModelSim, for example, continuously writes a waveform file (that can get real big, real fast). I suspect a fast SSD would improve performance of that machine a lot. I might put in a less ambitious ask for a new SSD.
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There's something kind of sad...