Some old MacBook Pro questions

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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The G4 should have a PRAM battery somewhere in it that might be preventing it from booting.
maurvir posted:
The G4 should have a PRAM battery somewhere in it that might be preventing it from booting.

OH! I hadn't even thought of that possibilty.

Here is iFitIt.com's guide to get to my PowerBook's PRAM battery and >EGAD!< it is a LONG process to get to it. Only a few steps short of the process to get out its hard drive.

OK, sometime I shall have to just do it.
<grumble> I probably cannot get my PB G4 running again.

For some reason--like in particular at iFixIt who you might think would post this info--figuring out the exact battery model for my PB's PRAM has been difficult to find.

I eventually found this which says that the battery was a Panasonic CGL3032,

BUT I cannot find ANY battery with that "CGL" suffix. I do not understand the coin battery naming system well enough to know if that is a crucial designation such as CGL batteries will deliver a different amperage from the more common CR batteries. Anyone wanna explain this to me, please? My search-fu has failed.

Worse, a careful look at the offering here makes me suspect that the PRAM UNIT is sealed inside its orange wrapping:

Image

Chances are that I can just slit the wrapping on the side and change the battery alone, but I don't know for certain that it will work once done. Or perhaps I will discover upon opening up my PB that I will see that the purpose for that wrapping was to protect the rest of the electronics within because the PRAM battery has leaked though limited by that wrapping (and thus I cannot replace the battery alone anyway).

Oh well. I guess I will be opening my PB up just to remove its hard drive OH! and to extract my 10.5 Leopard installation disk from its SuperDrive, then find out if anyone wants the rest for spare parts.

After that I need to find the parts for my 2001 iBook, specifically its battery and power supply....
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I would suspect that you just need a generic 3032 coin cell. The CGL is likely just a Panasonic prefix, because that looks visually identical to a standard 3032 cell. The bigger problem is that Apple stamped the terminals to the cell. Nothing that can't be fixed, but it won't be quite like popping in a new coin cell to a standard motherboard.

Otherwise, that board still looks fairly clean. The kapton tape could probably even be reused if you are careful.

EDIT: ... And I would be wrong. The CGL3032 is a rechargeable battery in the same shape as a normal CR3032. Also, they typically have those same stamped leads, so some solder work would need to be done to switch it out. That also explains the PCB.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/CGL-3032-3-7V- ... 1705209019
I put back together my iBook's parts and connected it to the PowerBook's power supply (they both use the same plug). It started up with a screech which went away after about 30 seconds. Because it hadn't been connected to power for such a long time, I got a warning which basically told me that the iBook recognized that its system date of some date in 1994 must be incorrect since the iBook itself has a build date of April 2001.

From over 25 feet away I can hear it trying to get the hard drive running again. I have forgotten precisely what was wrong with it, but I seem to recall that its hard drive was having some problems before I swapped it for my PowerBook for my mom.

I will try to see if I can get my iBook to boot into terminal mode just so I can read the hard drive's contents. If not that, then it will be hammer time for that hard drive.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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If you are that close to smashing it, you might try one last thing first - freezing it. Sometimes it works, and at worse, it won't make a dead drive any more dead. Stick it in a Ziploc with some fresh dessicant for a few hours, tap gently on the top, then try to power it up.
My iBook got to a point where on its screen it is alternating between a folder with an Apple Mac icon on it with another with a question mark on it.

I guess at least it is workable. I'm going to see if it will boot up with an OS 9 CD in the DVD drive, then see if I can use its Disk Utilities to reformat the drive.

<grumph> Except that it isn't booting up with that OS 9 CD. And now my iBook has gone rather ominously quiet where apparently it isn't even trying to access the hard drive anymore.

Oh well, I guess I WILL be spending a lot of time at home now waiting out the plague. I would like to get my iBook running again because I have an old database project that I would like to revive and it requires OS 9. I just have to figure out which hard drive I want to put into it.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I'm not sure, but I believe those iBooks took the old PATA/IDE 2.5" drives, right? If so, I have a few laying around. I'm pretty sure the 20GB is good, not sure about the 40GB.
<grumph> I looked on the OWC site just to find out if I could take the undoubtedly larger hard drive inside my PB and put it into my iBook, but they don't even offer ANY hard drives for either model any more.

Ah! MacTracker says that my iBook has an Ultra ATA connection to its hard drive while my PB has an "Ultra ATA/100 (ATA-6)". Sooo...MAYBE the latter hard drive will connect to my iBook? My memory fails to know with any certainty.

BUT by listening carefully I believe that the rattling that iBook is making is due to its fan(s) not being able to spin up properly, so when it goes quiet it is because the internals have decided to stop trying to spin the fan. Maybe I can clean the fan enough to let it to work quietly?

I tried holding down the "T" key in order to get my iBook to run in target disk mode, but each time I've tried that I do not get the screen with the Firewire icon floating on it. In fact the iBook doesn't even light up the screen and just constantly reboots.

Oh well, at least I can connect either one using a cable that I have so that I can attach an internal drive to a USB connecter, and thus be able to assess its contents once they are out.
dv
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DEyncourt posted:
<grumph> I looked on the OWC site just to find out if I could take the undoubtedly larger hard drive inside my PB and put it into my iBook, but they don't even offer ANY hard drives for either model any more.

Ah! MacTracker says that my iBook has an Ultra ATA connection to its hard drive while my PB has an "Ultra ATA/100 (ATA-6)". Sooo...MAYBE the latter hard drive will connect to my iBook? My memory fails to know with any certainty.

BUT by listening carefully I believe that the rattling that iBook is making is due to its fan(s) not being able to spin up properly, so when it goes quiet it is because the internals have decided to stop trying to spin the fan. Maybe I can clean the fan enough to let it to work quietly?

I tried holding down the "T" key in order to get my iBook to run in target disk mode, but each time I've tried that I do not get the screen with the Firewire icon floating on it. In fact the iBook doesn't even light up the screen and just constantly reboots.

Oh well, at least I can connect either one using a cable that I have so that I can attach an internal drive to a USB connecter, and thus be able to assess its contents once they are out.


The drives should be compatible (in both cases, the faster controller/drive is smart enough to work with the slower drive/controller.)

But if one is thicker than the other, it might not physically fit in the bay. (Drive thicknesses between 12mm and 17mm were common back then, iirc.)
Ah, much thanks, dv. I had forgotten about that drive thickness problem. It will probably more crucial for my iBook because there was very little spare room inside it, so its hard drive was more likely to have been a 12mm-thick model.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Out of curiosity, was your 2007 Macbook Pro repaired under the (at the time) GPU replacement recall?
maurvir posted:
Out of curiosity, was your 2007 Macbook Pro repaired under the (at the time) GPU replacement recall?

I believe NOT but because my particular 17" MBP was not among those being recalled.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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DEyncourt posted:
maurvir posted:
Out of curiosity, was your 2007 Macbook Pro repaired under the (at the time) GPU replacement recall?

I believe NOT but because my particular 17" MBP was not among those being recalled.


Ah, okay. I stumbled across a Luke Miani video where he was talking about his 2008 MBP with the defective nVidia chips and was reminded of the great GPU recall that soured Apple on the company. I wasn't sure if the 2007's were affected.
dv
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maurvir posted:
DEyncourt posted:
maurvir posted:
Out of curiosity, was your 2007 Macbook Pro repaired under the (at the time) GPU replacement recall?

I believe NOT but because my particular 17" MBP was not among those being recalled.


Ah, okay. I stumbled across a Luke Miani video where he was talking about his 2008 MBP with the defective nVidia chips and was reminded of the great GPU recall that soured Apple on the company. I wasn't sure if the 2007's were affected.


Many different models over several years, both PowerBook and Macbook varieties, suffered from various types of GPU soldering issue, which mostly boiled down to "shoving 10 pounds of human waste into a five pound bag... and then heating it to ~100C for a long time."

My 2004 iBook G4 was repaired under warranty when the Radeon GPU desoldered itself. Later models had the same problem, although some used nVidia chips, Intel CPUs, and so on.

Run your laptops cool or buy a desktop, seriously.
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Some old MacBook Pro questions

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