Well, isn't this just great...

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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My Windows 10 machine has apparently decided to start randomly rebooting itself - apparently in the last 24 hours. I thought it might have been a bad update initially, but it also rebooted while running memtest86. I wanted to rule out the hardware, but now it is looking like the hardware may be the issue.

It is an older system - i7 3770 with 32GB of RAM. It's possible it's just finally giving up the ghost, but I'm going to try reseating everything and repasting the heatsink. I'm also due for a fresh Windows install anyway, though I don't believe that's a factor at this point (given the memory test crashed it). It may also be time to look for a new motherboard and CPU, which makes me rather glad I hadn't pulled the trigger on a new battery for the MBP.

:(
You seem plagued by machines that shut themselves off. Didn't you have a linux machine and a hackintosh that also shut themselves off randomly?
Dang. You seem to have bad hardware karma. :(
juice Inadvertently correct
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Flaky power grid, or bad luck?
Static electricity or power surges I'm guessing, where I have my computer now seems to build up a lot of static electricity so I have to be careful when I touch my desktop or one of my monitors flickers or even the whole system crashes if I accidently zap the power button.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ribtor posted:
You seem plagued by machines that shut themselves off. Didn't you have a linux machine and a hackintosh that also shut themselves off randomly?


The Hackintosh was shutting itself down, but that same machine, as a Linux computer, hasn't had that issue. It's uptime is determined by how often Linux kernel updates are downloaded. I think it was a Hackintosh issue, not a hardware issue.

The Windows machine had, for years, been pretty reliable. This is fairly new for it.
I've had two old machines fail with spontaneous shutdown or re-boots.

One machine had a defective reset button.

One had a burned out voltage regulator next to a memory slot which was visually apparent and easily replaceable.
See if blowing out the dust bunnies with compressed air helps. Hot components might be shutting the machine down.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I did that, but the machine had been blown out after the move. However, it DID get moved (as in a moving truck), so I reseated everything - CPU, RAM, video card, etc., and cleaned the contacts on everything. I repasted the heatsink in the process, but the old compound was still in pretty good shape.

However, I did hear what sounded like coil whine from the power supply. At least I think it was the power supply - the motherboard was plugged in at the time. I'm beginning to wonder if the power supply is about to go out. I might have to pick up a new one this weekend to preempt that.

EDIT: I forgot that I replaced what is very likely a perfectly good PSU when the Hackintosh was having issues. (It didn't fix the issue - switching to Linux did) It's a 650W, which should still be fine for the Windows machine.
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Want to buy a barely used dual-booting Hackintosh?
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I'd actually be half-tempted, were I not saving up for a vacation in a few months.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I swapped out the power supply for known good unit, and it still shutdown, then restarted a short while later. It would seem the motherboard is toast. I suppose it is remotely possible it is the CPU, but when I was able to get it to stay up, it worked fine.

I could try to rig the power supply so that it can't be shut down electronically (hard wire the enable), but depending on the cause, that could fry the CPU and RAM.

So now I'm in a quandary. I have (what I believe is) a perfectly good i7-3770 and 32GB of PC3-1600 RAM, but a crapped out motherboard. Those parts are getting a bit old, but I'm torn between replacing the motherboard or replacing the whole core.

Crapola...
Maybe the CMOS battery is dead; that might cause some issues.
tin whiskers!
;)
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Yank all your ram and test run your PC using just one ram stick at a time. This will take awhile but your problem could very well be a bad stick.
I am going to assume you have already unplugged and reseated every thing that plugs or slots, right?
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Pariah posted:
Yank all your ram and test run your PC using just one ram stick at a time. This will take awhile but your problem could very well be a bad stick.
I am going to assume you have already unplugged and reseated every thing that plugs or slots, right?


Yup - pulled everything that could be realistically pulled and cleaned all the connectors carefully. I even swapped out the graphics card to make sure it wasn't something related to that.

However, there is one clue that I hadn't considered at first. Shortly before this all started, the CPU fan started acting odd - spinning up much higher than usual for the same loads. I'm beginning to wonder if, perhaps, the CPU might actually be bad, not the MB, and the system is going down due to thermals. Alternately, this MB does have a bunch of OC options that, while I never intentionally set them, could be corrupted. I'm going to nuke the UEFI parameters back to factory default and try it again.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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It looks like the motherboard is toast. I swapped out the i7-3770 for an i3-2100 that I had laying around. (The processor from my first Hackintosh) I also, for completeness, disconnected EVERYTHING not required to boot from the board. All SATA devices, PCI devices, etc. Only the motherboard, CPU, and RAM. No change. At this point, I'm calling it done.

However, that means there is a good chance the i7 is still fine, and I can migrate it to my Linux machine. I was briefly considering a replacement motherboard, but that would leave me with an 8 year old "new" computer, so instead I'm looking at upgrading a bit. I found an i5-8400 on craigslist that, along with a GTX 1060, the guy is asking $100 for. I was needing a new MB anyway, but this will mean replacing RAM as well. However, I found a Z390 board on NewEgg for $130. DDR4 RAM is commodity, and that CPU isn't a K series, so I'll probably drop 16GB in and call it good. 32GB was a bit overkill anyway.
I am running that i5 processor and it performs really well. No hyper threading, but 6 cores mostly makes up for it.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Yes, and actual cores are better than hyperthreading. I think a 6C processor should do fine for what I intend to use it for. Unfortunately, the motherboard for the i5 has bent pins. The CPU seems fine - no damage to the pads - but it definitely means that I will need a new board to run it. No clue if the RAM that came with it was okay or not.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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ARGH! Just shoot me now...

So, I got a new board today - A Gigabyte Z370M DS3H socket 1151 board. It was an open-box clearance board, but it fit the bill. (Though I will finally have to give up my Audigy 2 ZS card). I get everything installed, including my nice heatsink/fan from the old system, and it boots nicely. I get confirmation that the i5 is good, as well as the 16GB of DDR4 RAM. Naturally, I ran Memtest86 first to make sure everything was solid before reinstalling Windows. Only the front panel was connected (to turn the thing on), a keyboard, and the thumbdrive with the test tool.

About mid-way into the first run, it shuts down. JUST LIKE THE OLD BOARD. Thinking it might be a fluke, I do it again. Same thing. It immediately shuts down. It was about that moment that a sinking feeling set in. I turned on the board, then disconnected the front panel entirely.

Sure enough, the board is now on its second pass with no issues. I have this sneaking suspicion that I just replaced a perfectly good system due to a freaking faulty front panel button. :heh: I don't have a spare heatsink/fan at the house, so I'm going to take the board to work. However, I have this eerie suspicion that it will work just fine. :squint:

If it does, I'm going to have to apologize to my wife for spending money on new parts we didn't actually need and merge the best components again into my Linux machine. The Asrock Z77 Extreme Pro3 is close enough to the Z77 Extreme Pro4 that it should just come up without so much as a hitch.

Unfortunately, what this also means is that I need to replace the bad switch or get a new case... :der:
dv
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maurvir posted:
ARGH! Just shoot me now...

So, I got a new board today - A Gigabyte Z370M DS3H socket 1151 board. It was an open-box clearance board, but it fit the bill. (Though I will finally have to give up my Audigy 2 ZS card). I get everything installed, including my nice heatsink/fan from the old system, and it boots nicely. I get confirmation that the i5 is good, as well as the 16GB of DDR4 RAM. Naturally, I ran Memtest86 first to make sure everything was solid before reinstalling Windows. Only the front panel was connected (to turn the thing on), a keyboard, and the thumbdrive with the test tool.

About mid-way into the first run, it shuts down. JUST LIKE THE OLD BOARD. Thinking it might be a fluke, I do it again. Same thing. It immediately shuts down. It was about that moment that a sinking feeling set in. I turned on the board, then disconnected the front panel entirely.

Sure enough, the board is now on its second pass with no issues. I have this sneaking suspicion that I just replaced a perfectly good system due to a freaking faulty front panel button. :heh: I don't have a spare heatsink/fan at the house, so I'm going to take the board to work. However, I have this eerie suspicion that it will work just fine. :squint:

If it does, I'm going to have to apologize to my wife for spending money on new parts we didn't actually need and merge the best components again into my Linux machine. The Asrock Z77 Extreme Pro3 is close enough to the Z77 Extreme Pro4 that it should just come up without so much as a hitch.

Unfortunately, what this also means is that I need to replace the bad switch or get a new case... :der:


https://www.amazon.com/Electop-Power-Bu ... 01LMZZFWO/

You're welcome. :p ;)
Lol. That’s exactly the same mobo I am running the 8400 on. Great minds think alike.
Was the same case used with the other machines that had shut-down issues?
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ribtor posted:
Was the same case used with the other machines that had shut-down issues?


The case is very old, and has been through a bunch of boards. I forget the original system it held, but I bought it when I was still an undergrad - I think somewhere around '97 or '98. (I want to say the first board it held was a dual Pentium II server board). It still has an exposed floppy bay, though it's covered with a plastic plate. Silly, really, as the standard ribbon cable was always too short to reach it. It's been through probably 4 or 5 power supplies over the years, and the paint is stained from my daughter coloring it with crayons as a baby.

However, until last week, the systems in it had never been unstable. In fact, they were almost invariably either a server or my "serious" workstation builds.

As an aside, it is a SuperMicro SC750-A free-standing full tower server case. Other than the front cover, it is all thick steel construction with rolled edges. Both side panels are hinged, and the whole thing is powder coated. It is extremely sturdy. This isn't mine, but is extremely similar:

Image
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Welp, I just confirmed the old system was fine all along. It's running Memtest86 right now, but it's about 91% done with no errors. Other than the heatsink and graphics card, it is identical to the original configuration.

So, for now, I'm going to take the best/newest of the remaining parts and build my Linux machine from them. For now, that's the i7-3770, Asrock Z77 Extreme Pro4 mainboard, 32GB DDR3-1666 memory (PC3-12800), a GTX 1060 3GB, along with the original SSDs and RAID controller. For giggles, I still have a Firewire 400 card in it as well.

Assuming everything is fine at the end of the test, I'm going to sell the core system from the original Linux box to a buddy at work for his girlfriend. It will be an i5-2400 on an Asrock Z75 Extreme Pro3 with 16GB of DDR3-1867 RAM and GTX 760 with 2GB of VRAM.

As an aside, it turns out there is a UEFI/BIOS option you have to disable to get external graphics to work. I had done a complete reset to factory, which flipped that setting back. It took me a while to figure out why my 1060 wasn't working. Specifically, the option to allow the iGPU to work in parallel with another graphics card. Which is weird, because what it really did was disable the other card...
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Even though the 3770 is kinda old it is still overkill for what I need.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Pariah posted:
Even though the 3770 is kinda old it is still overkill for what I need.


It is a beast of a processor, even now. Of course, part of that is Intel sat on their ass for a while. I'm fine with that, though - my Linux machine is plenty fast enough with the upgrades.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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As an aside, my Windows box was one of the last machines left to still have a spinning HDD. Now that that machine has an i5-8400, I can almost literally feel that hard disk slowing things down. Once whatever I am doing is loaded into RAM, it flies. The loading bit, however, is very blatant, and very obnoxious.

The next upgrade will be a PCIe-4x NVME card...
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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maurvir posted:
Pariah posted:
Even though the 3770 is kinda old it is still overkill for what I need.


It is a beast of a processor, even now. Of course, part of that is Intel sat on their ass for a while. I'm fine with that, though - my Linux machine is plenty fast enough with the upgrades.

If you look around at new PCs, you notice you still have to buy a fairly expensive PC to get one faster than an 3770. Most consumer grade PCs and laptops are still slower.
Heck, more than half of Apple's current offerings are slower than our 7 year old PCs.
Looking at what is going on with software I don't see a 3770 equipped machine becoming obsolete for years. I expect my current 3770 system will most likely die before it is too slow.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Yeah. I have an i7-6700 sitting in a plastic storage tray in my parts bin. It would need a new motherboard and RAM, which would set me back about $180 minimum for a decent Z170 board and 16GB of DDR4-2133 RAM. (Technically speaking, I would upgrade the i5 machine to faster DDR4, but still...) That's taking into account those boards are old and on clearance (the local parts place has a Z170 board for $95)

Which seems reasonable, until you look at the benchmarking sites and realize that the i7-6700 is only about 18% faster at best, and the current system is more than fast enough. With a GTX 1060, Cinnamon runs smooth as silk on that machine, and despite using a 6GB SATA3 SSD vs NVME, apps load almost instantly.

As a result, I just can't justify building a system with that i7-6700.
dv
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maurvir posted:
Yeah. I have an i7-6700 sitting in a plastic storage tray in my parts bin. It would need a new motherboard and RAM, which would set me back about $180 minimum for a decent Z170 board and 16GB of DDR4-2133 RAM. (Technically speaking, I would upgrade the i5 machine to faster DDR4, but still...) That's taking into account those boards are old and on clearance (the local parts place has a Z170 board for $95)

Which seems reasonable, until you look at the benchmarking sites and realize that the i7-6700 is only about 18% faster at best, and the current system is more than fast enough. With a GTX 1060, Cinnamon runs smooth as silk on that machine, and despite using a 6GB SATA3 SSD vs NVME, apps load almost instantly.

As a result, I just can't justify building a system with that i7-6700.

If you'd paid more attention to benchmarks... you might not have bought the i7-6700 in the first place.

::happily chugs away with his i5-3750k @ 4.2GHz::
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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It was free, so I can't really complain. :shrug:
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Ha! I just checked and the 3770 was introduced in 2012. So it is an 8 year old cpu now.
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Well, isn't this just great...