Make sure your eggs, milk, and Chromebook aren't expired

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/09 ... comments=1

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A lot of Chromebook and Chromebox users don't realize this, but all ChromeOS devices have an expiration date. Google's original policy was for devices to be supported for five years, but the company has recently extended that time to 6.5 years.

When your Chromebook or Chromebox approaches its built-in expiration date, it will warn you that it's time to go buy a new device entirely. Not long after that, it will refuse to apply any further security or feature updates. In addition to leaving users vulnerable to unpatched security exploits, this means that constantly evolving services such as Gmail will eventually stop working entirely.


While I'm not even close to the target market for these, what kind of blatherskite is this? The whole OS is a freaking web browser on top of a Linux kernel. :squint:
juice Inadvertently correct
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This is a genius level of planned obsolescence. Talk about shareholder value!
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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what!? fiddlesticks that!

all ChromeOS devices? not just those sold directly by google but all of them?

Image :facepalm:

But... they can be hacked to install linux, or even windows, right? somebody must have done that already... right?
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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But... dammit, I don't even have one of those, and it makes me mad. Chrome and all google services keep bugging me to upgrade, but things still work... for the most part.
dv
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Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.
I almost got one for my dad...

And windows manages to target decades old hardware.
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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dv posted:
Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.


I don't know... can't you turn on your original xbox and play the original halo? would it die if you connect it to the internet?

Not supported and/or won't get updates, is different than 'will stop working'.
dv
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ukimalefu posted:
dv posted:
Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.


I don't know... can't you turn on your original xbox and play the original halo? would it die if you connect it to the internet?

Not supported and/or won't get updates, is different than 'will stop working'.


Original XBox? 2010. https://www.wired.com/2010/02/xbox-live/

The "will stop working" applies to online services - which, for a Chromebook, is everything.
dv posted:
Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.

I suspect that rationale will go overt very well with the target market
dv
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Betonhaus posted:
dv posted:
Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.

I suspect that rationale will go overt very well with the target market


Most of the target market won't care or will upgrade before 6.5 years anyway.

I don't approve of the practice, but I'm willing to bet that Google did their market research.
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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dv posted:
Betonhaus posted:
dv posted:
Making sure that all currently operational ChromeBooks have X hardware or better provides a development target.

Same as with game consoles.

I suspect that rationale will go overt very well with the target market


Most of the target market won't care or will upgrade before 6.5 years anyway.

:lol:

I see you've done tech support.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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There are several Linux distros that are drop in replacements for ChromeOS.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Pariah posted:
There are several Linux distros that are drop in replacements for ChromeOS.


This is true, and there are even open-source Chromium distros that almost perfectly replicate the real thing. It's still blatherskite that will make me question whether or not to suggest such a machine to a light user.

This crap isn't really acceptable on phones, where it sort of makes sense, but there is zero excuse to do this to 6.5 year old modern laptop hardware.
TOS
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not sure what the big deal is .... they're just making official what is practical reality for most users

not many people continue to use computers for 6.5 years
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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TOS posted:
not sure what the big deal is .... they're just making official what is practical reality for most users

not many people continue to use computers for 6.5 years

Man, you are seriously out of touch. Ten years ago no one who could in anyway afford it was using any 6.5 year old hardware but today? People are keeping hardware forever. If you bought something even half decent 7 years ago it is still viable today. Consumer level machines have barely progressed at all the last 6 or 7 years and system requirements have barely budged.
TOS
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Pariah posted:
TOS posted:
not sure what the big deal is .... they're just making official what is practical reality for most users

not many people continue to use computers for 6.5 years

Man, you are seriously out of touch. Ten years ago no one who could in anyway afford it was using any 6.5 year old hardware but today? People are keeping hardware forever. If you bought something even half decent 7 years ago it is still viable today. Consumer level machines have barely progressed at all the last 6 or 7 years and system requirements have barely budged.


prove it
Pariah posted:
TOS posted:
not sure what the big deal is .... they're just making official what is practical reality for most users

not many people continue to use computers for 6.5 years

Man, you are seriously out of touch. Ten years ago no one who could in anyway afford it was using any 6.5 year old hardware but today? People are keeping hardware forever. If you bought something even half decent 7 years ago it is still viable today. Consumer level machines have barely progressed at all the last 6 or 7 years and system requirements have barely budged.


We're not going to grow these modest hills into mountains if people stop craving new features.

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macnuke Afar
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Thank god it's only evil Google doing this and not our beloved Apple obsoleting our computers.
obvs My password is "contraseƱa"
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TOS posted:
not sure what the big deal is .... they're just making official what is practical reality for most users

not many people continue to use computers for 6.5 years
My main computer is a 2014 MacBook Pro with 16GB of RAM and 1TB of storage.

Could I see myself using this through next year? I certainly hope so. It's still really fast and works well.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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My two fastest systems have CPU's from 2011 and 2012, and they both run very well. As in zero complaints, even under Windows 10 (for the i7 system). They aren't even remotely close to being slow, much less too slow. The Sony VAIO I am typing this on right now is from 2009, and while it's starting to show its age, it is still a viable machine with Linux on it.

Now, these were reasonably nice machines new, and maybe that's part of the problem. Chromebooks, particularly older, cheaper units, were hot steaming turds right off the assembly line. However, an i3 or i5 based Chromebook should be good to go for a LONG time past its "expiration date" almost no matter when it was made. (I have a first gen i7 on my desk at work)
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Make sure your eggs, milk, and Chromebook aren't expired