iOS 13 is awesome

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Vulture 420
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The way I remember it, if you set up your phone to use your fingerprint biometrics, you can be forced is some cases to open your phone with your fingerprint, but it will remain locked with a passcode if not. These new phones don't have fingerprint ID, right? I never used it and never will.
macaddict4life posted:
DEyncourt posted:
I do not have FaceID on my iPhone, but I have NOT set mine with fingerprint logins because I do not want my biometrics to be stored.

While RIGHT NOW I do trust Apple with a lot in terms of security, there are cases where like US Customs they are willing to suck down the entire contents of smartphones "just in case" after you unlock your devices as a courtesy for inspection.

My understanding is fingerprints are only stored in Secure Enclave, rather than an accessible location for data retrieval.

Also, aren't they often scanning your fingerprints at the border anyway? Or is that not in the US; I can't recall, and now I'm global entry.

You're right on that last point--going across the border of the US one is likely to get fingerprints taken by US officials, but it won't be from my iPhone because no such biometrics exist there.

If and when I got a newer iPhone with FaceID I won't be using that either.

Do you think those US officials would tell Apple that they have cracked into Apple's Secure Enclave?
Lombo Opiofiend
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The ir flashes are used for the attention-aware features AND Face ID. The flashes are not harmful.
Vulture 420
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Lombo posted:
The ir flashes are used for the attention-aware features AND Face ID. The flashes are not harmful.

Unless your are epileptic, then they might trigger a seizure. For the majority of the public, being bombarded with IR flashes thousands of times a day all over the face and eyes is not harmful. I'd rather have the power to say no to it, especially since it's something nobody tells you is happening. You may not "see" it because it is IR, but it still is electromagnetic light energy bursting into your face from a device you pay through the nose to own and use.
I would like to hear somebody explain why I want thousands of IR flashes into my eyes per day over years and years.
Is there a link describing the details of these attention-aware features and how the IR bursts work? I have not been able to find anything yet.
ukimalefu dysfunctional
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Lombo Opiofiend
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https://www.howtogeek.com/404731/are-ir ... your-eyes/

You can use Face ID and if you disable the attention-aware feature you will be flashed with it only when you unlock.
Vulture 420
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Cool, I turned mine off.

ukimalefu posted:

That's got some decent info. I read that exact page about 4 months ago when I first noticed all this IR flashing on the passersby at night.
DEyncourt posted:
macaddict4life posted:
DEyncourt posted:
I do not have FaceID on my iPhone, but I have NOT set mine with fingerprint logins because I do not want my biometrics to be stored.

While RIGHT NOW I do trust Apple with a lot in terms of security, there are cases where like US Customs they are willing to suck down the entire contents of smartphones "just in case" after you unlock your devices as a courtesy for inspection.

My understanding is fingerprints are only stored in Secure Enclave, rather than an accessible location for data retrieval.

Also, aren't they often scanning your fingerprints at the border anyway? Or is that not in the US; I can't recall, and now I'm global entry.

You're right on that last point--going across the border of the US one is likely to get fingerprints taken by US officials, but it won't be from my iPhone because no such biometrics exist there.

If and when I got a newer iPhone with FaceID I won't be using that either.

Do you think those US officials would tell Apple that they have cracked into Apple's Secure Enclave?

My understanding is that Secure Enclave lacks an ability to be read from outside of Secure Enclave, full stop. And even if the government can do it, that's going to be lab time, not quick lightning plug at the immigration desk time.

But really, this feels like working to secure your passport number. Uh, they already have it.
Vulture 420
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macaddict4life posted:


But really, this feels like working to secure your passport number. Uh, they already have it.

Passport or Passcode?
Lombo Opiofiend
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So, Vulture you enabled Face ID and disabled the attention-aware features? I find it supremely useful. I had to disable the require attention for unlock since I have a pretty bad case of strabism and the phone would think that I was not looking at it even when I was.
Vulture 420
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I disabled Face ID and attention-aware features. I am not interested at this point in using Face ID. I have a passcode lock. With these settings off I will check on an IR camera to see if it kills all the flashing.
Lombo Opiofiend
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Face ID would only flash your face on unlock. Not all the time. I don’t understand why you would not give it a spin. The iPhone have to be at least 20 cm from your face to flash the it dot projector. There is no way it can be harmful. You would have to have it at 1mm from your eyeball AND GET 20 continuous minutes to experience a harmful effect. As it is your lightbulb is more dangerous than these.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Lombo posted:
Face ID would only flash your face on unlock. Not all the time. I don’t understand why you would not give it a spin. The iPhone have to be at least 20 cm from your face to flash the it dot projector. There is no way it can be harmful. You would have to have it at 1mm from your eyeball AND GET 20 continuous minutes to experience a harmful effect. As it is your lightbulb is more dangerous than these.


While I agree that FaceID's sensor is safe enough, there is a reason to be potentially concerned. IR light doesn't cause a blink reflex like visible light, and it's one of the reasons why working with industrial IR lasers is kind of unnerving.
ukimalefu dysfunctional
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maurvir posted:
Lombo posted:
Face ID would only flash your face on unlock. Not all the time. I don’t understand why you would not give it a spin. The iPhone have to be at least 20 cm from your face to flash the it dot projector. There is no way it can be harmful. You would have to have it at 1mm from your eyeball AND GET 20 continuous minutes to experience a harmful effect. As it is your lightbulb is more dangerous than these.


While I agree that FaceID's sensor is safe enough, there is a reason to be potentially concerned. IR light doesn't cause a blink reflex like visible light, and it's one of the reasons why working with industrial IR lasers is kind of unnerving.


there's a difference between tiny LEDs and lasers.
Vulture 420
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Lombo posted:
Face ID would only flash your face on unlock. Not all the time. I don’t understand why you would not give it a spin. The iPhone have to be at least 20 cm from your face to flash the it dot projector. There is no way it can be harmful. You would have to have it at 1mm from your eyeball AND GET 20 continuous minutes to experience a harmful effect. As it is your lightbulb is more dangerous than these.

It's a matter of control. The phone is constantly reading data about me as I point it at my face, and I am just opting out of involuntary random and constant IR flashing in my face. When I turn the light on at home, I make the decision to do so. Most people don't even know their phones are doing this, and when you tell them, the typical response is, so what? I'm never the typical response. I also always have my cameras covered on my phone and webcams until I want to use them specifically. Most people do not.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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ukimalefu posted:
maurvir posted:
Lombo posted:
Face ID would only flash your face on unlock. Not all the time. I don’t understand why you would not give it a spin. The iPhone have to be at least 20 cm from your face to flash the it dot projector. There is no way it can be harmful. You would have to have it at 1mm from your eyeball AND GET 20 continuous minutes to experience a harmful effect. As it is your lightbulb is more dangerous than these.


While I agree that FaceID's sensor is safe enough, there is a reason to be potentially concerned. IR light doesn't cause a blink reflex like visible light, and it's one of the reasons why working with industrial IR lasers is kind of unnerving.


there's a difference between tiny LEDs and lasers.


Nope. You can get eye-damaging output from some REALLY SMALL laser diodes. I have an old one somewhere in my desk that looks like a regular old T1 3/4 water clear LED, and you can see the chip inside is tiny. It puts out enough IR energy to burn holes in things.
ukimalefu dysfunctional
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https://www.howtogeek.com/404731/are-ir ... your-eyes/

Quote:
The IR-LED that’s built into your phone is classified as near IR (700–900 nm). It straddles the line between the visible light spectrum and the IR spectrum. Near IR is very similar to visible light, it’s just a lot more difficult for you to see.

The radiation from both visible light and near IR light can heat objects, depending on light intensity and exposure time. Prolonged exposure to high-intensity IR and visible light (staring at the sun or a bright lightbulb) can cause your photoreceptors to bleach and your lens to develop cataracts. To experience vision loss with a low intensity visible or IR light, you would need to keep your eyes open within a millimeter of the light source for almost 20 minutes. This could happen with a light bulb or an IR-LED.


Quote:
Another big misconception that’s floating around is that the IR LED in your phone is a laser. It isn’t. Lasers are a narrow wavelength of light, and they move in a single direction. The lights on your phone occupy a broad wavelength. They’re also diffused by lenses and filters because they need to be able to illuminate your entire face.


Quote:
Finally, a scientific paper about the effects of IR radiation on the eyes of rabbits has been floating around, and it’s scaring a lot of people. Essentially, rabbits were exposed to IR light, and they developed lens damage and cataracts. But if you take a minute to read this paper, it’s clear that you can’t apply these results to the use of IR scanners in phones.


Quote:
For the IR-LED in your phone to cause immediate damage to your eye, you would have to hold it 1mm away from your eye for 17 unbroken minutes. It isn’t possible to do this with a Galaxy or iPhone X, as both products limit IR exposures to 10 seconds, and they won’t emit IR light unless the device is 20cm from your head.

Vulture 420
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Well, it's good to know you won't be physically burned in the eyeballs while being IR flashed in the face thousands of times a day for years.
Lombo Opiofiend
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If you disable the attention aware feature it will only flash you on unlock.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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This is the single greatest thing about iOS 13.
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Donkey Butter jerk face
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is this awareness thing on iPhones, and if so how do you shut that part down and keep the face id?
Vulture 420
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Donkey Butter posted:
is this awareness thing on iPhones, and if so how do you shut that part down and keep the face id?

I believe it is on all models beginning with X, so from 2 years ago. You can turn off attention-aware features and still have Face ID.
Vulture 420
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Quick aside, I think it's great that I can charge my phone with my Phillips toothbrush charger.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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So no Catalina today? Bummer
Vulture posted:
Well, it's good to know you won't be physically burned in the eyeballs while being IR flashed in the face thousands of times a day for years.

Do you put on sunscreen to walk from your house to your car?
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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It's frickin' Arizona, of course I do.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Donkey Butter posted:
is this awareness thing on iPhones, and if so how do you shut that part down and keep the face id?

If the person calling you is in your contacts, it will still ring. Other than that, I don't know what to tell you.
Pithecanthropus posted:
Donkey Butter posted:
is this awareness thing on iPhones, and if so how do you shut that part down and keep the face id?

If the person calling you is in your contacts, it will still ring. Other than that, I don't know what to tell you.

All unknown callers get sent straight to voicemail where--if they are like most useless telemarketers--they will NOT leave any messages.

But what Donkey Butter was asking about was the IR laser effect for FaceID. I do not have a current iPhone which uses FaceID, but Vulture had answered earlier that on his new iPhone 11 Pro he had disabled FaceID in order to avoid the attention awareness feature that FaceID uses.
Lombo Opiofiend
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You can keep Face ID and disable the attention-aware features. Go to settings —> Face ID & Passcode —> uncheck attention-aware features.

I find it very useful. It is like the phone is mind-melding with me with it on.
Vulture 420
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Lombo posted:
It is like the phone is mind-melding with me with it on.

Yep, that's the point, it mind melds!
Vulture 420
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macaddict4life posted:
Vulture posted:
Well, it's good to know you won't be physically burned in the eyeballs while being IR flashed in the face thousands of times a day for years.

Do you put on sunscreen to walk from your house to your car?

No, the sun gives me Vitamin D, which I want. The IR flashing is not harmful, and has nothing to do with dangerous exposure to radiation, it has to do with with the flashing bursts that subconsciously program your brain to accept quick flashing cues. This is what makes it dangerous to epileptics, who also don't have to wear sunscreen. All I'm trying to say to everyone out there about this underreported feature is to be careful.

Oh, but iOS 13 is still awesome, and the new phone is pretty incredible.
Lombo Opiofiend
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I did a small sample video using all three lenses at 4K @24 FPS. I uploaded it on YT.
Here is the link: https://youtu.be/ppNc13weAjw

It does not show me the 4K option so can anyone tell me if it transcoded it in 4K also?
dv
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Lombo posted:
I did a small sample video using all three lenses at 4K @24 FPS. I uploaded it on YT.
Here is the link: https://youtu.be/ppNc13weAjw

It does not show me the 4K option so can anyone tell me if it transcoded it in 4K also?


Image

Not sure why it would have done that, I've successfully uploaded 4k video before.
dv posted:
Lombo posted:
I did a small sample video using all three lenses at 4K @24 FPS. I uploaded it on YT.
Here is the link: https://youtu.be/ppNc13weAjw

It does not show me the 4K option so can anyone tell me if it transcoded it in 4K also?


Image

Not sure why it would have done that, I've successfully uploaded 4k video before.



My guess is the encoding settings are wrong. Try doing the MP4 (h.264) encode using High profile with a level of 5.1. Level 5.2 will be needed if you want 4k @60fps.

(I only was able to go up to 1080p)
Lombo Opiofiend
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I used the YouTube app to upload from the iPhone 11 pro but based on DV screenshot it went as high as 4K.
ukimalefu dysfunctional
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I believe you cannot watch 4k on iOS because apple and google hate each other.

Actually, there's some proprietary codec or something that either Apple won't pay for, or Google doesn't want Apple to have, so no 4k youtube for Apple.

That IS something I've heard about. Not sure if it is what's happening to you.
dv
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Lombo posted:
I used the YouTube app to upload from the iPhone 11 pro but based on DV screenshot it went as high as 4K.


1440p isn't 4k/2160p
Lombo Opiofiend
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Oops, what is the actual resolution of a 4K movie?
dv
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Lombo posted:
Oops, what is the actual resolution of a 4K movie?


In computer terms, it's 3840x2160 (four 1080p screens.)

In TV terms sometimes it's 4096x2160. ("Cinema" 4k. Slightly wider aspect ratio.)

Either way, the iPhone 11 does support 4k video, so "why is my video 1440p and not 2160p" is a perfectly valid question.
Lombo Opiofiend
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Did you knew that the 11 pro not only shoot at 4K @60 FPS but it does it with smart HDR which means it takes 120 frames per second(60 underexposed + 60 overexposed) And compute the resulting video in real-time?
Astounding.
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iOS 13 is awesome

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