Feds approve T-Mobile + Sprint merger

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/201 ... nt-merger/

I get why some people are rankled by this, but the fact is, Sprint isn't going to last much longer and I would rather see T-Mobile get that spectrum than Verizon or AT&T. A weakened competitor (Dish) is better than a dead competitor.

It does suck that we will be down to three major wireless companies, but at least it will be three near equals, not two giants, a half-ling, and a half-dead gnome.
iDaemon infinitely loopy
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Disappointing DOJ result.

I heard rumors like Dish is gonna be the new Number 4?

Anyway...

I’ve been very satisfied w/T-Mobile for almost 10 yrs now.

I do not know the future for me. For a variety of reasons not directly tied to this merger I may not re-up on iPhone 11. But this merger clouds and complicates all the rest of my decision-making - like New T-Mo will be player in online video I hear? I am not a cable or sat TV subscriber. If they were to offer some nice package I might be interested.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I get why you feel that way, but Verizon and AT&T would gobble up a failing Sprint when the Japanese finally decided they were tired of constantly playing fourth fiddle. I would much rather have three evenly sized competitors, so I feel this is a reasonable compromise.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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This does not really affect me, as I am using Ting and the T-mobile network.
maurvir posted:
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/201 ... nt-merger/

I get why some people are rankled by this, but the fact is, Sprint isn't going to last much longer and I would rather see T-Mobile get that spectrum than Verizon or AT&T. A weakened competitor (Dish) is better than a dead competitor.

It does suck that we will be down to three major wireless companies, but at least it will be three near equals, not two giants, a half-ling, and a half-dead gnome.

The US has >300 million people and 3 wireless carriers...

Taiwan has ~29 million people and 5 wireless carriers...

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macnuke Afar
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are Taiwan's carriers run like US carriers? that just might the reason there.
macnuke posted:
are Taiwan's carriers run like US carriers? that just might the reason there.

Most likely not.

The current situation in the US is especially ironic considering that AT&T was once a key component of Ma Bell (as The Phone Company was once known in the US) before being broken up in 1984 into about twenty regional entities so that among them Pacific Bell covered the Pacific coast (did it include Hawaii and Alaska? I don't recall).

But over the intervening time what became AT&T gradually reabsorbed much of the old phone system. Southwestern Bell--which originally covered Arizona through southern Illinois--gobbled up 10 of those old Bell entities then eventually grabbed the remnants of AT&T, after which it took on the overall moniker of AT&T. At the same time the NEW Phone Company was able to stretch into other fields like absorbing WarnerMedia 'cause, ya see, if their primary business isn't just phones then they cannot be a monopoly rebuilding itself (just a fiercer multi-headed hydra having a taste into everything).

Verizon has a similar history although not quite as diversified at AT&T. It began as several former Bell companies covering from Pennsylvania through Virginia (so including DC) reformed into Bell Atlantic. In 1997 it (re-)absorbed NYNEX whose phone coverage was NY State and New England, then in 2000 it acquired GTE which was still a separate phone company from Ma Bell (I can still recall seeing ads for GTE in Los Angeles and not at all understanding them) after which it took on the name of Verizon.

So...success? Instead of Ma Bell (and GTE) in the US we now have Ma Bell1 and Ma Bell2 (and what the T-Mobile/Sprint merger will become).
I pay US$13/month for unlimited 4G (actually unlimited, and US LTE = Taiwan 4G). They have gotten in trouble for pricing their service illegally LOW in an ugly fight for subscribers. They got in trouble because the new sign ups were technically operating at a loss.

So I'm going with no. :P
iDaemon infinitely loopy
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VOX has a tedious explainer about the merger that’s really in-depth exploration of DOJ conflict-of-interest under this regime with info about the recent US phone market - and near the end has

Quote:
A consortium of 14 state attorneys general, led by New York, has filed suit in federal court to block the merger, citing the obvious anti-competitive impact of going from four wireless providers to three and arguing that the side deal with Dish is inadequate protection.
The litigation will mostly end up being decided on technical grounds, as antitrust lawsuits tend to be,
but it at least potentially could be a venue for some politically ambitious AGs to try to ask deeper questions about corruption in the Trump White House.
And even if the attorneys general don’t go in that direction, congressional Democrats could. Many Senate Democrats, including presidential candidates Cory Booker and Amy Klobuchar, put out statements condemning the settlement on Friday morning. And the deal in an unusual way squares the circle between Democrats’ fascination with Trump’s potential personal misdeeds and a desire to focus on back-to-basics kitchen table economics.

iDaemon infinitely loopy
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Also - Verizon...

Quote:
In 1997 it (re-)absorbed NYNEX whose phone coverage was NY State and New England,


I had an early experience with that version of Verizon and it left me hating them forfuckingever
All the low cost alternative carriers are going to vanish overnight. Sprint was the only network that gave them favorable bandwidth resale rates.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Aaron_R posted:
All the low cost alternative carriers are going to vanish overnight. Sprint was the only network that gave them favorable bandwidth resale rates.

Nah, Ting has been Sprint and T-Mobile for years.
iDaemon infinitely loopy
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CNBC

Quote:
T-Mobile President and COO Mike Sievert will succeed John Legere as CEO on May 1, 2020, the company announced Monday.
Shares of T-Mobile were down about 1.9% in premarket trading following the news.
Sievert has been the heir apparent as Legere was expected to step down as CEO once T-Mobile's merger with Sprint is completed. CNBC's David Faber reported in July that Sievert was expected to take over as CEO once the deal closes. The deal has cleared key hurdles on the federal level but still faces a legal challenge from a team of state attorneys general seeking to block the deal

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Feds approve T-Mobile + Sprint merger