Looking for a good, CHEAP hackintosh GPU upgrade

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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So, I have a very stable Hackintosh, but one with some pokey parts. While the i5 wasn't exactly what I was hoping for (I wanted the i7-3770), it's actually performing quite nicely for what I am using the machine for, so I'm going to stick with it for now. The machine didn't even burp when I swapped out the i3-2100 for the i5-2400, which is the kind of upgrade I like.

However, I have an ancient AMD 5770 graphics card in it. I briefly toyed with a R7 250X, but it wasn't significantly faster enough to put up with the video corruption problem. (Any video format would cause blocks of crap that only relogging/rebooting would clear).

The problem is, that 5770 apparently still rates fairly well against a lot of affordable cards produced later. I had briefly looked at a GTX 1050, and while it is an improvement over my current card, it's not the slam dunk I would have hoped for. Not at a *used* price of well over $120.

Also, I'm reading horror stories about High Sierra not working well with certain nVidia cards, even with the web drivers. It's making me a bit nervous, as I really want to keep this machine a Hack.

Any suggestions? Also, if you have an older card that is better than my 5770 that you aren't using, and that would work well in a hack, let me know!
I may have something; but my house is a mess right now because I am re-modeling. nVidia GTX 760, pretty sure it runs without the web drivers; however, the only nVidia cards that do not work in High Sierra with the web drivers are newer RTX cards, and perhaps some Quadros. Can your case take a double width card and supply (I think it is 6 pin) power?

(it has a 6-pin and a 8-pin for power; I did find it, shoot me PM if interested)
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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The i7 3770 is maintaining its value on the used market way more than it should. It's actually cheaper to go find a used PC with a 3770 in it than it is to buy the raw CPU used.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Pariah posted:
The i7 3770 is maintaining its value on the used market way more than it should. It's actually cheaper to go find a used PC with a 3770 in it than it is to buy the raw CPU used.


Yeah, I've noticed that. However, this i5 isn't a slouch. I haven't noticed any serious CPU related deficiencies with it the way I did with the i3.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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maurvir posted:
Pariah posted:
The i7 3770 is maintaining its value on the used market way more than it should. It's actually cheaper to go find a used PC with a 3770 in it than it is to buy the raw CPU used.


Yeah, I've noticed that. However, this i5 isn't a slouch. I haven't noticed any serious CPU related deficiencies with it the way I did with the i3.

Ya, the i5 is an OK chip, way better than the i3 you had. For what I do a 3770 is a beast that will last me for many years, I don't come close to using all it's power.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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I still have an i3-2120 running my media machine, works just fine for that.

Main machine is a Ryzen 5 2600
I sorta want to upgrade my CPU and GPU but atm I can't really justify replacing the 1500X and r9 290. I did get an Intel 1TB PCIe SSD to replace my old 256gb Sata SSD. I have most stuff moved to the HDD data pool but it's still getting full.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ok, so I finally got around to installing that GTX 760 from avkills. It did NOT work out of the box in Sierra (10.12.6), however it DID work out of the box in High Sierra (10.13.6). Since I have been wanting to upgrade anyway, that was serendipitous.

The next question is, stick with native drivers or install the nVidia web drivers? The card appears to be working fine, though I haven't had a chance to benchmark it yet.
I would just use the native drivers; you should install CUDA though. (I trust that it is a better than your previous card. ;) )
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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It is definitely faster, but I think I may have found a new problem. I have had the machine lock up once and possibly power down on its own once since it has been installed. The power supply is a 600W unit, which should have enough oomph, but it may be folding with the sheer amount of 12V current required.

Of course, I also upgraded to High Sierra at the same time. I will have to do some research to see if that is a possible cause of the weirdness as well.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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600 watts should be fine, I ran one on a 500 watt PSU. You do have the PCI power plugs installed I hope.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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arkayn posted:
600 watts should be fine, I ran one on a 500 watt PSU. You do have the PCI power plugs installed I hope.


Yup, wiring wise it's all good. This EVGA GTX 760 takes both a 6 and 8 pin connector, and both are installed. However, this power supply is every old. It may just be at end of life, and upping the current requirements pushed it there a tad faster. I think the PSU is about 8 years old.

At any rate, it is definitely the power supply. It's shutting down on its own after a few hours. I'm going to see if I can find anything in town, but it looks like the only stuff in stock is EVGA and Corsair, neither of which are highly rated. My hope is that by going up in wattage, and underloading, it will be fine.

I may have a 550W modular at work I can borrow, but I don't know that I can track down all the cables. (The downside of a modular power supply)
Bummer on the PSU. I have a 750W for reference (but also bought this much figuring on a future bigger GPU and/or CPU); but I also had a i7-4770k which probably uses a bit more juice than your i5.
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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avkills posted:
Bummer on the PSU. I have a 750W for reference (but also bought this much figuring on a future bigger GPU and/or CPU); but I also had a i7-4770k which probably uses a bit more juice than your i5.


My primary PC has a 950W, but I do have two 1070's in there.
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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arkayn posted:
avkills posted:
Bummer on the PSU. I have a 750W for reference (but also bought this much figuring on a future bigger GPU and/or CPU); but I also had a i7-4770k which probably uses a bit more juice than your i5.


My primary PC has a 950W, but I do have two 1070's in there.


Nice!
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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maurvir posted:
arkayn posted:
600 watts should be fine, I ran one on a 500 watt PSU. You do have the PCI power plugs installed I hope.


Yup, wiring wise it's all good. This EVGA GTX 760 takes both a 6 and 8 pin connector, and both are installed. However, this power supply is every old. It may just be at end of life, and upping the current requirements pushed it there a tad faster. I think the PSU is about 8 years old.

At any rate, it is definitely the power supply. It's shutting down on its own after a few hours. I'm going to see if I can find anything in town, but it looks like the only stuff in stock is EVGA and Corsair, neither of which are highly rated. My hope is that by going up in wattage, and underloading, it will be fine.

I may have a 550W modular at work I can borrow, but I don't know that I can track down all the cables. (The downside of a modular power supply)

Have you tried blowing out the power supply with canned air really good, could be it has a 1/2 pound of dust up in there.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Unfortunately, no on the dust. I cleaned it up before putting it in this Phantek case, which has dust filters on all the fan intakes. Visually it is clean as a whistle.

I am about to try an EVGA 850GQ, though. Best Buy didn't have the 750 in stock, and while I suspect the 650 would be fine, I figured overkilling it on power couldn't hurt. It also helped that it was on sale, and I got 20% off - making it very close to the Amazon price. This beast has separate outputs for four 6/8 pin connectors - I need two. It even has a second 12V aux CPU power connector (which I also didn't need). It just barely fits, and I had to pull the RAID to connect the cables, but it's in and all the cables are dressed.

As an aside, while I love the ribbon cables, they do make the cables harder to dress compared to discrete wire in a sheath. EVGA also didn't leave enough space between SATA power connectors either - the side by side SSD/HDD required me to skip one. Fortunately, they do give you three connectors per cable, so I still only needed two of them (one for the RAID + power light, another for the SSD and backup HDD)

If it was the power supply, I should know soon. This machine started crapping out within hours of putting in the new graphics adapter and High Sierra SSD. (Though the complete loss of power leads me to believe power supply, not OS)
I had a choke/VRM fault that looked like a power supply failure. A close look at the board showed heat discolouration around a couple of MOSFETS and one had bubbled up.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Worth a look, but the machine stayed up all night with no issues. I think the power supply may have fixed that problem at least.

However, it seems I have run into a second problem. Finder is occasionally hanging with the spinning beach ball. I noticed it the other night, but I chalked it up to a possible fault in the power supply. This morning I noticed VLC had faulted sending a video to a Chromecast. When I went to kill it, finder died again with the spinning beach ball requiring a hard power cycle. (Which is really a shame, as it was clear the rest of the machine was up)

It seems the finder issue may be something with High Sierra, though. A bit of research seems to indicate that a lot of folks are having this issue with it.

That said, it might not hurt to look. The FETs are under heatsinks and it's a black board, but you never know.
My symptoms were random shut-downs plus a very specific ram error that the OS reported. A failed power module fed a section that powered a memory controller and it showed up as a memory fault.
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Looking for a good, CHEAP hackintosh GPU upgrade