"A Few Simple Steps to Vastly Increase Your Privacy Online"

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Source.

First, the author recommends using Firefox if only because:
Quote:
A non-profit giving away free software makes sense. Some of the biggest companies in the world giving away free software is suspicious.

Then he recommends several browser extensions, some of which are available for Firefox ONLY.

He personally likes and uses StartPage for Firefox's search engine, though he considers DuckDuckGo just as good. Note that:
Quote:
[Both of t]hese search engines are still ad-driven, but they are generic ads around your search terms, not targeted to you in any way or aware of your information. It's a straightforward business model that I can trust, so I have no reason to think they are tracking me and lying about it.

Switch DNS to 1.1.1.1 when possible. I can do this on my MacBook Pro easily enough, but on my iPhone this is problematic.

Finally:
Quote:
Be a Good Netizen

Be sure to turn off uBlock Origin and Smart Referer for sites that you value, as those likely provide valuable revenue and analytics for them.

ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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don't people watch tv and movies?

steal wifi with a burner phone

-

but ok, the last two, I do
Donkey Butter jerk face
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What does switching your DNS to 1.1.1.1 do?

And how do you do that?
macnuke Afar
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DEyncourt posted:

Quote:
A non-profit giving away free software makes sense.


just like facebook and most any other site...

If you aren't paying for it... you're the product.
Donkey Butter posted:
What does switching your DNS to 1.1.1.1 do?

And how do you do that?

The author explains:
Quote:
So yeah, there's a server out there that knows every domain that you try to visit. This is definitely something we want to be secure. Your ISP will usually configure your device to use their own by default when you connect to your Wifi, but that's probably not going to get you what you want in terms of privacy and speed.

Fortunately, you can tell your computer which DNS to use.

The company Cloudflare has a publicly accessible DNS at the address 1.1.1.1 that they claim is encrypted and secure. They promise not to sell your browsing history or even log your IP address in order to tie queries to a single person, let alone you.

And you know what? That's about the best you can ask for with a centralized infrastructure for the internet. A recurring theme in this quest for data ownership and privacy is that you can only take it so far before you have to ultimately trust a company or entity to do what they say they're doing.

[links omitted]

He also provides links to sites which give instructions on how to make the DNS settings switch on Windows 10 PCs, MacOS computers, iOS devices (although this appears to be out-of-date because I could not use it. My iPhone 7 with iOS 12.1.4 is different), Android devices with another link specifically for those using Android 9.x Pie.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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macnuke posted:
DEyncourt posted:

Quote:
A non-profit giving away free software makes sense.


just like facebook and most any other site...

If you aren't paying for it... you're the product.

There is a rather vast difference between Mozilla's business model and Facebook's.
macnuke Afar
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you mean they don't farm data?
nothing?
nada?
zip?

there is no kinda/maybe/sorta pregnant.
it's yes or no.
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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Donkey Butter posted:
What does switching your DNS to 1.1.1.1 do?

And how do you do that?


https://1.1.1.1/#explanation
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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macnuke posted:
you mean they don't farm data?
nothing?
nada?
zip?

there is no kinda/maybe/sorta pregnant.
it's yes or no.

No.
Then how are they paying for that fancy office in the SF Financial District?
macnuke Afar
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MacAddict4Life posted:
Then how are they paying for that fancy office in the SF Financial District?


they make up for it with volume.
I did all the things the article mentioned that I wasn't already doing.

Changing the DNS in the PC is simple to do but wouldn't it have to be changed in the router ?
dv
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Ribtor posted:
I did all the things the article mentioned that I wasn't already doing.

Changing the DNS in the PC is simple to do but wouldn't it have to be changed in the router ?


Ideally yes. Depending on what other DNS shenanigans you're up to, anyway.
There's also setting within Firefox to manually set a DNS.

Wouldn't the DNS set in the home router makes any settings in the PC or browser irrelevant?
dv
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Ribtor posted:
There's also setting within Firefox to manually set a DNS.

Wouldn't the DNS set in the home router makes any settings in the PC or browser irrelevant?


No. The setting on your computer will* override the setting provided by the router.

*Unless somebody who's moderately competent and a little mischievous decides to prevent that, of course.
dv posted:
Ribtor posted:
There's also setting within Firefox to manually set a DNS.

Wouldn't the DNS set in the home router makes any settings in the PC or browser irrelevant?


No. The setting on your computer will* override the setting provided by the router.

*Unless somebody who's moderately competent and a little mischievous decides to prevent that, of course.


Seems counter intuitive to me.

Nevertheless I set everything I could to the 1.1.1.1 and ran "namebench" and it did report a significant speed increase over the default settings.
When you computer connects to your network, it asks your router for an IP address, as well as information it needs like the DNS addresses. By default, your router has asked your ISP for DNS servers, and then passed to your computer those same server addresses. If the DNS servers your ISP tells your router about were to change, that change would also be passed to all the devices on your home or work network.

When you set manual DNS on a device, that device will still ask for an IP address, but it will not longer listen to the DNS addresses the router provides. Instead it will take the DNS server addresses you already told it about and use those. That means they will never be updated on their own, as locally stored addresses are replacing the process of asking for addresses.

I would set it on a router level, rather than a per-device level. That way you can set it once and be done, plus if you have a problem and need to change it again, you can easily do so for all devices at once. This is what I do, as I use a Smart DNS service that lets all of my devices use Hulu and other US-only services despite being in Taiwan. Anything that connects to our home network will use my Smart DNS service automatically, so I don't have to manually set each computer, tablet, phone, and AppleTV. Plus when there was a problem with the Smart DNS servers a couple of years ago, I just had to change the DNS server on the router and everything was back online. Once the Smart DNS issues was fixed a day later, it was also quick and easy to change everything back.
obvs precoupado
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I would set it on both the router level and the device level, because there's a good chance your devices are sometimes connected through other routers.
obvs posted:
I would set it on both the router level and the device level, because there's a good chance your devices are sometimes connected through other routers.

Does it have to be set on a per-network basis on devices?
There are three levels easily available to me which I have used; in the PC's IPv4 network settings; in Firefox's network.trr.mode settings etc for HTTPS; and in the router itself.

I have too much time on my hands.
dv
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Ribtor posted:
There are three levels easily available to me which I have used; in the PC's IPv4 network settings; in Firefox's network.trr.mode settings etc for HTTPS; and in the router itself.

I have too much time on my hands.


So you use the internet, but only ironically?
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"A Few Simple Steps to Vastly Increase Your Privacy Online"