Well this is cool (AR shadows in interface)

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An ex-Apple engineer created brilliant new iPhone software that would make Apple jealous — take a look

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Burrough's "Project Erasmus" is a user-interface (UI) implementation that uses the lighting in your immediate environment to light, shade, and reflect on the software elements in the device. The result is an incredible, immersive visual effect that would make you want to use your phone even more (as if that's possible).


This actually does look pretty cool. Though we have largely moved away from skeuomorphic design...
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Given the issues I have differentiating colors, the addition of shadows would be immensely helpful in visually defining user interface elements. I really hope this gets added to phones.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Betonhaus posted:
An ex-Apple engineer created brilliant new iPhone software that would make Apple jealous — take a look

Quote:
Burrough's "Project Erasmus" is a user-interface (UI) implementation that uses the lighting in your immediate environment to light, shade, and reflect on the software elements in the device. The result is an incredible, immersive visual effect that would make you want to use your phone even more (as if that's possible).


This actually does look pretty cool. Though we have largely moved away from skeuomorphic design...

A fad that needs to die. The whole "flat" thing has produced a generation of devices that are harder to use than what came before. Flat is a regression.
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maurvir Meat popsicle
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We peaked a while back in terms of user interfaces and have been going steadily downhill ever since. The worst part is that this is true across the board. Case in point: What uncouth individual thought it was a good idea to move important control functions to a touch screen in a car? :squint:
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Another good thing about Linux is I can and have installed themes that are not flat. :)

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dv
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maurvir posted:
We peaked a while back in terms of user interfaces and have been going steadily downhill ever since. The worst part is that this is true across the board. Case in point: What uncouth individual thought it was a good idea to move important control functions to a touch screen in a car? :squint:


Somebody who missed "planned obsolescence" but realized that if we went back to drivetrains that human waste the bed at 80k miles, people would have a fit.

They realized that if you make the entire car dependent on a $4000 iPad programmed by an idiot and built by the lowest bidder, then not only will you have more affluent people buying new cars every 3-5 years because they like the GUIs better, but you'll also turn any car over 7 or 8 years old into rolling salvage when the center console starts glitching.

IMO there should be two things:
1) NHTSA requirements for physical controls for climate control, seat adjustment, gear selection, etc. (Enough to safely and comfortably get the car from point a to point b if your kid spills a big gulp on the screen.)
2) a standardized interface (probably based on CANBus) and a standardized physical form factor that allows third-party head units to plug into a car, auto-discover features, and control them. (Don't like Ford's head units? Buy a Toyota unit and install it in your F150. Buying a new car but have your playlists and GPS locations configured just the way you like it? Swap in the unit from your old car, as long as it "understands" all the features the new car has.)

But that'll never happen because we live in the worst timeline.
maurvir Meat popsicle
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That may have been the point, but the upshot is that you have now lost tactile sensation, which means you can no longer use muscle memory to adjust controls. No, now you have to take your eyes off the road and look at a damn computer to adjust things.

Critical controls, and even commonly used controls, should be required to be operable WITHOUT taking your eyes off the road. Climate control might be the one exception, as it isn't critical, but the current crop is mostly ridiculous.
Not to mention that having interchangeable console units is why my Focus had a irreplaceable fiddly bit that at the push of a button popped out and disabled the whole system.

But yeah, touchscreens do not belong in cars. I don't have one in my car
dv
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maurvir posted:
That may have been the point, but the upshot is that you have now lost tactile sensation, which means you can no longer use muscle memory to adjust controls. No, now you have to take your eyes off the road and look at a damn computer to adjust things.

Critical controls, and even commonly used controls, should be required to be operable WITHOUT taking your eyes off the road. Climate control might be the one exception, as it isn't critical, but the current crop is mostly ridiculous.


Where I live, climate control is not an exception - you don't have to be able to do it while you're driving, but if you can't turn the defroster on, you can't operate a vehicle safely.

The Lincoln MKZ I think gets double "goddamit" points for having climate controls that are NOT part of the infotainment system, but which are touch sensitive anyway. (Zero tactile feedback.)
maurvir Meat popsicle
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dv posted:
maurvir posted:
That may have been the point, but the upshot is that you have now lost tactile sensation, which means you can no longer use muscle memory to adjust controls. No, now you have to take your eyes off the road and look at a damn computer to adjust things.

Critical controls, and even commonly used controls, should be required to be operable WITHOUT taking your eyes off the road. Climate control might be the one exception, as it isn't critical, but the current crop is mostly ridiculous.


Where I live, climate control is not an exception - you don't have to be able to do it while you're driving, but if you can't turn the defroster on, you can't operate a vehicle safely.

The Lincoln MKZ I think gets double "goddamit" points for having climate controls that are NOT part of the infotainment system, but which are touch sensitive anyway. (Zero tactile feedback.)


Same is true here, and in some ways, the climate control system can be considered "critical". I was nearly in a wreck because my previous car wasn't able to defog the windows during a rather sudden downpour in the middle of the summer. In this case it was due to Toyota putting a compressor protection system in to keep the AC from freezing up (AC would cut out if the humidity got too high...), not crappy controls, but still. I have needed these controls while driving, though, so I consider them critical.

Bumping the cabin temperature up, however, is something that can wait until you are at a stoplight, etc.
dv
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Betonhaus posted:
Not to mention that having interchangeable console units is why my Focus had a irreplaceable fiddly bit that at the push of a button popped out and disabled the whole system.


Those sorts of anti-theft measures are increasingly irrelevant.

The proprietary head units (especially the touchscreen ones) are crazy-expensive - there's less demand, but also less supply, so there should be a market for stolen ones, and they're not THAT hard to remove if you don't care about damaging the rest of the car.

But thefts are lower than ever, mostly because the consoles (and entire cars, now) brick themselves if they detect tampering.
maurvir Meat popsicle
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dv posted:
Betonhaus posted:
Not to mention that having interchangeable console units is why my Focus had a irreplaceable fiddly bit that at the push of a button popped out and disabled the whole system.


Those sorts of anti-theft measures are increasingly irrelevant.

The proprietary head units (especially the touchscreen ones) are crazy-expensive - there's less demand, but also less supply, so there should be a market for stolen ones, and they're not THAT hard to remove if you don't care about damaging the rest of the car.

But thefts are lower than ever, mostly because the consoles (and entire cars, now) brick themselves if they detect tampering.


They brick themselves if they lose power. Just letting your battery get too low can trigger it.
dv
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maurvir posted:
dv posted:
Betonhaus posted:
Not to mention that having interchangeable console units is why my Focus had a irreplaceable fiddly bit that at the push of a button popped out and disabled the whole system.


Those sorts of anti-theft measures are increasingly irrelevant.

The proprietary head units (especially the touchscreen ones) are crazy-expensive - there's less demand, but also less supply, so there should be a market for stolen ones, and they're not THAT hard to remove if you don't care about damaging the rest of the car.

But thefts are lower than ever, mostly because the consoles (and entire cars, now) brick themselves if they detect tampering.


They brick themselves if they lose power. Just letting your battery get too low can trigger it.


Yup. Or if you didn't tighten your positive battery terminal enough when you swapped the new battery in, and it worked itself loose when you went over some bumps, and you got the "REPLACE BATTERY NOW!" message on your way to work.
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Well this is cool (AR shadows in interface)