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dv
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mmaverick posted:
:p

16 is the sweet spot anyways. More than you'll need unless you're doing a lot of heavy lifting.

and when they were 16's I should have told you to sell them and get 2 8's.


https://www.newegg.ca/Product/ProductLi ... 0600551103

They go for a tonne.


That's because they're ECC server DIMMs. The 3570k and its non-server-ey memory controller maxes out at 8GB/dimm, 32GB total.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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that's right it was, skylake that could take them wasn't it? or was it broadwell? christ I hate intel.
dv
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mmaverick posted:
that's right it was, skylake that could take them wasn't it? or was it broadwell? christ I hate intel.


Skylake moved to 64GB of RAM support, support for DDR4 and 16GB DIMMs.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9483/inte ... generation
Vulture 420
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Ah yes, this thing is Ivy Bridge LGA 1155, the motherboard supports up to 32 GB with 4 slots.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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The reduced ram consumption seems to be persistent. I have yet to see ram used over 4.7GB.
It is nice cruising along only using about %60 of my ram.
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dv
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Pariah posted:


So, realistically, are those mostly Chromebooks, or is there some Android browser that misreports itself as Desktop Linux?
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I don't trust charts like that at all.

I figure some huge percentage of internet traffic is caused by bots.
TOS
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obvs posted:
I figure some huge percentage of internet traffic is caused by bots.


bots and video
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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obvs posted:
I don't trust charts like that at all.

I figure some huge percentage of internet traffic is caused by bots.

Ya, I don't either but I can say that the Linux universe feels like it has grown a lot over the last five years. More sites, a steady stream of n00bs on forums and more and more Linux stories on mainstream tech sites.
5 years ago there was a bit of the beleaguered feeling around Linux but lately the sense is things are going great.
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Last night I checked my update manager and saw a wap update that was flagged high priority so I installed it.
This morning I wake up to read about the big wap vuln in the news. This has happened several times in the past.
It is nice to get the patch before most people have even heard of the problem.
Linux devs are speedy.
dv
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Pariah posted:
Last night I checked my update manager and saw a wap update that was flagged high priority so I installed it.
This morning I wake up to read about the big wap vuln in the news. This has happened several times in the past.
It is nice to get the patch before most people have even heard of the problem.
Linux devs are speedy.


...are you sure that was what the patch was for? Debian has been patched for a while, but dunno if it made its way downstream to Mint.

CVE-2017-13078.

None of my devices have patches yet.
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Last night I checked my update manager and saw a wap update that was flagged high priority so I installed it.
This morning I wake up to read about the big wap vuln in the news. This has happened several times in the past.
It is nice to get the patch before most people have even heard of the problem.
Linux devs are speedy.


...are you sure that was what the patch was for? Debian has been patched for a while, but dunno if it made its way downstream to Mint.

CVE-2017-13078.

None of my devices have patches yet.

Seems like it. It had a big bright exclamation mark. :shrug:

I looked at my history and the update was for wpa_supplicant which is the code effected by KRACK.
ukimalefu dysfunctional
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There are TWO parts to the KRACK exploit for WPA2 WiFi:
1) a weakness in the current WPA2 protocol which allows its password to be exposed, and
2) a problem with SOME devices which can be forced into network decryption mode.

While apparently most of (all?) WiFi with WPA2 is vulnerable to part 1), it is fixable through changes in code for which many companies are creating/issuing fixes.

Part 2) is especially a problem for Android/Linux devices because even those running Marshmallow can be forced into that network decryption mode which can expose a network's WPA2 password. This is NOT true for devices using Windows or iOS.
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I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.
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Fairly big news out of the Linux Mint mothership. They are dropping their KDE edition and Flatpack will be bundled in all Mint editions in the upcoming 18.3 release.
Dropping KDE makes sense. Mint has Cinnamon, MATE and XFCE which all have a high degree of compatibility and then KDE which is wandering ever further afield with every release. Mint's Xapps project isen't for KDE.
KDE is just a bad fit for a distro with the ambitions Mint has.
I am excited about Flatpack. I like the concept, the security and stability improvements and flatpack will open fresher repos to Mint's user base. I am not the kind of user that gets all bent about having duplicate libs on my drive. Most of them are like 30k so who cares?
One down side to Mint that came with the move to LTS is that available apps could get kinda stale and, while PPAs help with that there are concerns about security and adding PPAs is still a process that is not as nice as you'd want it to be.
Flatpack will likely make PPAs obsolete in Mint, that's a good thing.
For a for a distro as conservative as Mint this is an unusually newsworthy blog post. Gonna get everyone all riled up.
Read all about it:
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3418
dv
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Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.
dv
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Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.


Maybe not. Specs say the 690 used Core 2 based Xeons. So it wouldn't likely be any faster than what you have, and reliability on machines that old is spotty.

http://www.dell.com/us/dfb/p/precision-690/pd
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.


Maybe not. Specs say the 690 used Core 2 based Xeons. So it wouldn't likely be any faster than what you have, and reliability on machines that old is spotty.

http://www.dell.com/us/dfb/p/precision-690/pd

Ya, I know but the Xeons speced in the ad must have been upgrades because the 690s were not offered with 3.4Ghz cpus.
dv
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Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.


Maybe not. Specs say the 690 used Core 2 based Xeons. So it wouldn't likely be any faster than what you have, and reliability on machines that old is spotty.

http://www.dell.com/us/dfb/p/precision-690/pd

Ya, I know but the Xeons speced in the ad must have been upgrades because the 690s were not offered with 3.4Ghz cpus.


It's much more likely that they were 2.4GHz CPUs. There was only one 3.4GHz model, very rare. And a 150w TDP.

https://ark.intel.com/products/36893/In ... 00-MHz-FSB

Overclocking is possible, but newer CPUs would have required a motherboard swap to support them. Either way you're now buying somebody frankenPC.

$60 for a C2D-based workstation is fair, but the specs don't pass the sanity test.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.


Maybe not. Specs say the 690 used Core 2 based Xeons. So it wouldn't likely be any faster than what you have, and reliability on machines that old is spotty.

http://www.dell.com/us/dfb/p/precision-690/pd

Ya, I know but the Xeons speced in the ad must have been upgrades because the 690s were not offered with 3.4Ghz cpus.


It's much more likely that they were 2.4GHz CPUs. There was only one 3.4GHz model, very rare. And a 150w TDP.

https://ark.intel.com/products/36893/In ... 00-MHz-FSB

Overclocking is possible, but newer CPUs would have required a motherboard swap to support them. Either way you're now buying somebody frankenPC.

$60 for a C2D-based workstation is fair, but the specs don't pass the sanity test.

Even with Core2 based CPUs a dual socket system, 8 cores, 16 threads w/32 GB of ram is worth more than $60. The ram alone is worth that.
But, ya, it never smelled right. I went for it because it would have been kind of a fun, unique PC to play with.
Altho I am sure electrical consumption would have been appalling.

Last edited by Pariah on Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:45 pm.

dv
User avatar
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I responded to a Craig's list ad that I think is probably a mistake or a scam.
The listing is for a Dell Precision 690 w/ dual Xeon@3.4Ghz with 32GB of ram, no HDD, no OS for $60.
Ya, crazy. My bet is the lister meant to say $600 not $60.
The only way I would buy it is if it can be hooked up to a monitor so I can boot into Mint off a USB stick and inspect it. If this is legit it will be a stupidly awesome buy.

Any luck?

Nope, never heard back and the ad was pulled about a day latter. :(

I know it was a deal too good to be true but I had to give it a shot. I have seen plenty of time people selling old PCs for WAY below their actual value so...Would have been a killer deal on a killer rig.


Maybe not. Specs say the 690 used Core 2 based Xeons. So it wouldn't likely be any faster than what you have, and reliability on machines that old is spotty.

http://www.dell.com/us/dfb/p/precision-690/pd

Ya, I know but the Xeons speced in the ad must have been upgrades because the 690s were not offered with 3.4Ghz cpus.


It's much more likely that they were 2.4GHz CPUs. There was only one 3.4GHz model, very rare. And a 150w TDP.

https://ark.intel.com/products/36893/In ... 00-MHz-FSB

Overclocking is possible, but newer CPUs would have required a motherboard swap to support them. Either way you're now buying somebody frankenPC.

$60 for a C2D-based workstation is fair, but the specs don't pass the sanity test.

Even with Core2 based CPUs a dual socket system, 8 cores, 16 threads w/32 GB of ram is worth more than $60. The ram alone is worth that.
But, ya, it never smelled right. I went for it because it would have been kind of a fun, unique PC to play with.


C2Ds don't have Hyperthreading. It would have been 8c/8t, and not particularly fast threads, at that.

The ECC DDR2 they used back then is cheap and easy to find on eBay from recyclers in China.

It's "worth" that because everything server-ey is $X minimum, since you usually need to match a particular part. Motherboard? $X. CPU? $X. RAM? Doesn't matter if it's 8GB or 64GB: $X. RAID Controller? $X. Complete system? $X.

edit: *sigh* I'm doing it again, aren't I. *deep breath*

/sits down and shuts up.
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Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I did look at the passmark scores for the CPU speced in the ad and the quad @3.4Ghz scored about 50% faster than the quad I am comfortably using now so it would have been considerably faster than the rig I have now.
dv
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Pariah posted:
I did look at the passmark scores for the CPU speced in the ad and the quad @3.4Ghz scored about 50% faster than the quad I am comfortably using now so it would have been considerably faster than the rig I have now.

Hold out for quadruple.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
I did look at the passmark scores for the CPU speced in the ad and the quad @3.4Ghz scored about 50% faster than the quad I am comfortably using now so it would have been considerably faster than the rig I have now.

Hold out for quadruple.

I am in no hurry for a new system. This old quad is fast enough to be well inside my comfort zone. It was feeling kinda creaky a couple of years ago but I got an SSD and doubled the ram to 8GB and now it works great.
I am surprised that this old thing still performs as well as it does. The SSD made a BIG difference and having plenty of ram helps.
I can have two browsers open, each streaming hd, be editing a picture in the GIMP and installing updates all at the same time and nothing ever hangs. It's kinda remarkable.
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Hey Pariah, I was just wondering if you ever thought of getting an Android phone, rooting it, and installing LineageOS on it without installing the Google Apps? It's basically Android but without Google.
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obvs posted:
Hey Pariah, I was just wondering if you ever thought of getting an Android phone, rooting it, and installing LineageOS on it without installing the Google Apps? It's basically Android but without Google.

Nope.
I want my desktop to me customizable and versatile to suit me needs and personality because my desktop is my digital "home". My phone is just this handy tool I use for a certain set of tasks and I want it to be as appliance like as possible.
What I want from my desktop is completely different from what I want in a phone. At present Apple delivers what I want best. That could change but for now I prefer iOS on a phone.
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My wife's laptop went belly up the other day so I created an account on my PC for her to use. Yesterday I laid down for a nap and my wife was using my PC. When I got up I found my PC with a locked up UI and several blank alerts stacked on top of each other. A reboot was required to resolve the issue.
My wife reported this happened while she was doing general web stuff.
My PC is like a rock. One of the things I have enjoyed about using Linux is how very bomb-proof it is and I have never, in over 5 years of using Linux seen anything like what I saw yesterday.
I know my wife isn't doing anything weird or wrong, she is a very ordinary user yet I swear she must give off some sort of technology crippling radiation because she is always running into little glitches and oddities I never see.
The weird thing is I have seen this seemingly impossible problem with other people.
It is so weird, I mean, on Linux or any other modern OS the user really can't fiddlesticks things up but....
I really don't know what to make of it.
macnuke Afar
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If you build it... they will come.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I just installed Mint 18.3 and updated my kernel for a security patch.
As I have come to expect from Mint, everything went smooth as silk and the whole process: download system update and reboot then download kernel update and reboot took under 5 min.
The big change is the new software center which now offers Snap packages.
Suddenly my software selection is much larger and far more up to date and probably the biggest change in Mint since I began running it. The new software center seems much faster but a bit glitchy. v1.0 problems that will be sorted rapidly if history is any guidance.
With Mint new toys get rolled out in the point releases and stabilized on the whole number releases so people like me who grab the point releases are basically beta testers, which is fine and fully disclosed. Clem never fails to discourage upgrading so fair warning is always given and even with that the point releases have never had any show stoppers.
Mint: reliable as ever.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I now have three screens:
32in 720p screen for Netflix and other video consumption, 19in normally oriented 1280x1024 set as my primary and a vertically oriented 1024x1280 where my utilities can live now.

What fun! :D
:
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I have had my new system for awhile and, ya, I am totally happy.
I have been using computers all my life and this one, it is what I have been waiting for.
Gawd, talk about hilarious overkill.
I finally goaded this system into flinching by starting 8 HD streams (4 Chrome, 4FF, all Youtube) while Handbraking a DVD and running a system update. The audio glitched a little and I got the cpu up to 65c.
Since I am a masochist I have continued to follow the market even tho I already bought and I have yet to find a similar deal so..ya me!.
It will be interesting to see how long this already 5yo Dell will last. As it is it totally does what I want blink of an eye fast and I already have a PSU if I need to upgrade my GPU for 4k.
A dope like me with a PC this powerful, who'da thought it possible?
Running Linux on an i7 w/12GB of ram on an SSD is about as close to computron heaven as I have ever been.
dv
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Upgraded my main linux box the other day. Had been rocking a dual-core Celeron for four years; "real" CPUs finally came down enough in price that I felt like it was worth doing.

Code:
dv@server:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'processor\|model name' && free
processor       : 0
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 1
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 2
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 3
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 4
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 5
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 6
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 7
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:       16391232     6795560      776772       18124     8818900     9034536
Swap:      16734204       91628    16642576
dv@server:~$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +27.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)
temp2:        +29.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 0:         +39.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 1:         +40.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 2:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 3:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)

dv@server:~$


Besides running Plex and local DNS, this actually hosts a Windows VM I use for work, and... just a leeeetle bit of network storage.

Code:
dv@server:~$ df -h /ARRAY
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/md0         15T  4.9T  9.0T  36% /ARRAY
dv@server:~$


I'm liking not having to run Windows and Crashplan on the same two CPUs. Can get crunchy.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Upgraded my main linux box the other day. Had been rocking a dual-core Celeron for four years; "real" CPUs finally came down enough in price that I felt like it was worth doing.

Code:
dv@server:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'processor\|model name' && free
processor       : 0
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 1
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 2
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 3
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 4
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 5
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 6
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 7
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:       16391232     6795560      776772       18124     8818900     9034536
Swap:      16734204       91628    16642576
dv@server:~$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +27.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)
temp2:        +29.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 0:         +39.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 1:         +40.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 2:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 3:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)

dv@server:~$


Besides running Plex and local DNS, this actually hosts a Windows VM I use for work, and... just a leeeetle bit of network storage.

Code:
dv@server:~$ df -h /ARRAY
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/md0         15T  4.9T  9.0T  36% /ARRAY
dv@server:~$


I'm liking not having to run Windows and Crashplan on the same two CPUs. Can get crunchy.

What is the advantage of Xeon over an i7 at the same speed and physical core count?
Passmark says that the E3-1231 performs pretty much the same as my i7 3770.
Is it all about ECC ram or is there something else?
dv
User avatar
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Upgraded my main linux box the other day. Had been rocking a dual-core Celeron for four years; "real" CPUs finally came down enough in price that I felt like it was worth doing.

Code:
dv@server:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'processor\|model name' && free
processor       : 0
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 1
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 2
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 3
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 4
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 5
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 6
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 7
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:       16391232     6795560      776772       18124     8818900     9034536
Swap:      16734204       91628    16642576
dv@server:~$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +27.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)
temp2:        +29.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 0:         +39.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 1:         +40.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 2:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 3:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)

dv@server:~$


Besides running Plex and local DNS, this actually hosts a Windows VM I use for work, and... just a leeeetle bit of network storage.

Code:
dv@server:~$ df -h /ARRAY
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/md0         15T  4.9T  9.0T  36% /ARRAY
dv@server:~$


I'm liking not having to run Windows and Crashplan on the same two CPUs. Can get crunchy.

What is the advantage of Xeon over an i7 at the same speed and physical core count?
Passmark says that the E3-1231 performs pretty much the same as my i7 3770.
Is it all about ECC ram or is there something else?


ECC support (my motherboard actually requires it ) and some virtualization features (hardware passthrough) that the iX usually lack.

The exact differences vary between generations, but for Haswell I think that's it.

My next project is installing my old GPU and passing it through to a VM, just to prove that I can. :)
Pariah Know Your Enemy
User avatar
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Upgraded my main linux box the other day. Had been rocking a dual-core Celeron for four years; "real" CPUs finally came down enough in price that I felt like it was worth doing.

Code:
dv@server:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'processor\|model name' && free
processor       : 0
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 1
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 2
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 3
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 4
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 5
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 6
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
processor       : 7
model name      : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1231 v3 @ 3.40GHz
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:       16391232     6795560      776772       18124     8818900     9034536
Swap:      16734204       91628    16642576
dv@server:~$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +27.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)
temp2:        +29.8°C  (crit = +105.0°C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 0:         +39.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 1:         +40.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 2:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 3:         +41.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)

dv@server:~$


Besides running Plex and local DNS, this actually hosts a Windows VM I use for work, and... just a leeeetle bit of network storage.

Code:
dv@server:~$ df -h /ARRAY
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/md0         15T  4.9T  9.0T  36% /ARRAY
dv@server:~$


I'm liking not having to run Windows and Crashplan on the same two CPUs. Can get crunchy.

What is the advantage of Xeon over an i7 at the same speed and physical core count?
Passmark says that the E3-1231 performs pretty much the same as my i7 3770.
Is it all about ECC ram or is there something else?


ECC support (my motherboard actually requires it ) and some virtualization features (hardware passthrough) that the iX usually lack.

The exact differences vary between generations, but for Haswell I think that's it.

My next project is installing my old GPU and passing it through to a VM, just to prove that I can. :)

Interesting.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
User avatar
News Blog:
I am typing this on Mint 19.2. I had installed 19 awhile back but then things in my life got busy and I never did the final steps to fully change over and went back to using 18.3 just cuz it was all setup exactly the way I wanted already and I have been feeling very tech lazy lately.
Last night in a burst of ambition I booted into 19 and straight away upgraded to 19.2 synced some stuff and am now planing on using 19.2 going forward and abandoning the 18.3 install that has been my home a couple of years.
I used the backup tool to backup my Home and then to restore the files to my new Home and it worked slick as you'd want, super easy migration.
19.2 is nice, as is typical of Mint there is no big, in your face changes, just more refinement and some modest new features. The default selection of themes is a bit larger but they are all a bit too flat for my taste so eventually I will be digging around GnomeLook for something less flat. Ugh, this whole flat thing is really getting old.
On the bright side the new dark themes really work well, in the past there were some glitches but they are all gone as far as I can tell. I have been using one of the dark themes but I feel like I am going to be going back to my usual neutral grey look that I find is just better on a day in, day out basis. I think my long term Mac usage has made me gravitate towards neutral greys.
I am going to take another shot at installing a VM to run Win7 and Photoshop on. The whole dual boot thing turns out to be more of a pain in the ass than I like. I have tried installing a VM before but, apparently I am a VM moron because I have never gotten one to work right for me. I am sure this will be fodder for a future post when I get around to feeling like tackling this project.
If I can get Win7 running well in a VM I will start all over, nuke my Windows partition and let Mint own my whole 256GB SSD.
I don't know why I thought dual booting would work for me, I have always disliked doing that. I think I just forgot what a PITA it was.
Switched back to a grey theme. This is what my main screen desktop looks like now. I am not really sure how I feel about the window list with app grouping but I will use it awhile and see if it grows on me.
After using 19.2 for a bit I have noticed that font rendering is stick fiddling fantastic. It was fine in 18.3, but, wow, the new clarity and sharpness is super nice and no stick fiddling around in font settings to get fonts nice like I had to in 18.

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