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Pariah Know Your Enemy
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oath posted:
Pariah posted:
oath posted:
So Ubuntu has decided to abandon Unity. a UI I hated at first but grew to appreciate. I grew to love it so much in fact on my windows 10 machine I moved the start bar to the left and in my MacOSX machine at work I used Ubar (https://brawersoftware.com/products/ubar) to do the same. I now think Unity was a step towards a new and better human UI and this is a blow for that.


http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/04/ubun ... -not-unity

Ha! A Panel for OSX, pretty sweet.
A great thing about Linux is the nice selection of very good desktop environments we have now. Personally I am all in with Cinnamon but I could be very happy using MATE. I guess I am kinda old school. Gnome3 and Unity are both too elaborate for me but I believe the people who say they love them.
I'm not worried about Ryzen support in Linux, by the time I start building anything it will all be sorted out.
I was looking at some benchmarks for the low end Ryzen 5 and Passmark puts the Ryzen at being a little more than 4 times faster than the Core2Quad I am running and my quad really is still holding up pretty well to what I toss at it.
I figure I could put together a Ryzen 5 system for under $500 that would likely serve me well for ten years (if current trends persist). Around $300 for the CPU and MoBo, pick up a case off Craig's list for $20, buy a 3 year old gaming video card for $50 and what ever 16GB of ram costs and bob's your uncle.


If you are willing to wait for the Ryzen APU's you may not even need a video card. The APU's have always had great graphics with good for the money but below intel CPU's I suspect these new APU's are going to end up in a lot of low end and mid range laptops and that is where AMD will really hurt intel. I took my old A10-5700 that use to be my main desktop CPU and moved it into my PLEX box and that thing is now a decent SteamBox for nothing. With no additional graphics card.

Not interested in the APUs AMD makes. Their history of terrible Linux driver support makes me Leary of any newer AMD graphics.
I also want to be able to drive 3 monitors and I specifically mentioned getting an older card because the best way to avoid graphics issues in Linux is to never use a GPU chipset less than 2 years old. Since my graphics needs are not demanding a nice, used, 2 or 3GB gaming card would be a perfect fit and give me good future proofness. Used, relatively high end graphics cards are dirt cheap.
I keep hardware a long time and I believe that, going forward, many threadedness and relatively powerful graphics are going to be more important than strong single thread performance.
Pariah posted:
oath posted:
Pariah posted:
oath posted:
So Ubuntu has decided to abandon Unity. a UI I hated at first but grew to appreciate. I grew to love it so much in fact on my windows 10 machine I moved the start bar to the left and in my MacOSX machine at work I used Ubar (https://brawersoftware.com/products/ubar) to do the same. I now think Unity was a step towards a new and better human UI and this is a blow for that.


http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/04/ubun ... -not-unity

Ha! A Panel for OSX, pretty sweet.
A great thing about Linux is the nice selection of very good desktop environments we have now. Personally I am all in with Cinnamon but I could be very happy using MATE. I guess I am kinda old school. Gnome3 and Unity are both too elaborate for me but I believe the people who say they love them.
I'm not worried about Ryzen support in Linux, by the time I start building anything it will all be sorted out.
I was looking at some benchmarks for the low end Ryzen 5 and Passmark puts the Ryzen at being a little more than 4 times faster than the Core2Quad I am running and my quad really is still holding up pretty well to what I toss at it.
I figure I could put together a Ryzen 5 system for under $500 that would likely serve me well for ten years (if current trends persist). Around $300 for the CPU and MoBo, pick up a case off Craig's list for $20, buy a 3 year old gaming video card for $50 and what ever 16GB of ram costs and bob's your uncle.


If you are willing to wait for the Ryzen APU's you may not even need a video card. The APU's have always had great graphics with good for the money but below intel CPU's I suspect these new APU's are going to end up in a lot of low end and mid range laptops and that is where AMD will really hurt intel. I took my old A10-5700 that use to be my main desktop CPU and moved it into my PLEX box and that thing is now a decent SteamBox for nothing. With no additional graphics card.

Not interested in the APUs AMD makes. Their history of terrible Linux driver support makes me Leary of any newer AMD graphics.
I also want to be able to drive 3 monitors and I specifically mentioned getting an older card because the best way to avoid graphics issues in Linux is to never use a GPU chipset less than 2 years old. Since my graphics needs are not demanding a nice, used, 2 or 3GB gaming card would be a perfect fit and give me good future proofness. Used, relatively high end graphics cards are dirt cheap.
I keep hardware a long time and I believe that, going forward, many threadedness and relatively powerful graphics are going to be more important than strong single thread performance.


All I can say in response is my A10-5700 ran really well and and I always ran 2 monitors in it in Linux as my main machine and had no issues. I repurposed it into my PLEX box because the graphics are so good without a external card. Ryzen APU are going to be way better than my old A10 so Just saying maybe look into it.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
User avatar
oath posted:
Pariah posted:
oath posted:
Pariah posted:
oath posted:
So Ubuntu has decided to abandon Unity. a UI I hated at first but grew to appreciate. I grew to love it so much in fact on my windows 10 machine I moved the start bar to the left and in my MacOSX machine at work I used Ubar (https://brawersoftware.com/products/ubar) to do the same. I now think Unity was a step towards a new and better human UI and this is a blow for that.


http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/04/ubun ... -not-unity

Ha! A Panel for OSX, pretty sweet.
A great thing about Linux is the nice selection of very good desktop environments we have now. Personally I am all in with Cinnamon but I could be very happy using MATE. I guess I am kinda old school. Gnome3 and Unity are both too elaborate for me but I believe the people who say they love them.
I'm not worried about Ryzen support in Linux, by the time I start building anything it will all be sorted out.
I was looking at some benchmarks for the low end Ryzen 5 and Passmark puts the Ryzen at being a little more than 4 times faster than the Core2Quad I am running and my quad really is still holding up pretty well to what I toss at it.
I figure I could put together a Ryzen 5 system for under $500 that would likely serve me well for ten years (if current trends persist). Around $300 for the CPU and MoBo, pick up a case off Craig's list for $20, buy a 3 year old gaming video card for $50 and what ever 16GB of ram costs and bob's your uncle.


If you are willing to wait for the Ryzen APU's you may not even need a video card. The APU's have always had great graphics with good for the money but below intel CPU's I suspect these new APU's are going to end up in a lot of low end and mid range laptops and that is where AMD will really hurt intel. I took my old A10-5700 that use to be my main desktop CPU and moved it into my PLEX box and that thing is now a decent SteamBox for nothing. With no additional graphics card.

Not interested in the APUs AMD makes. Their history of terrible Linux driver support makes me Leary of any newer AMD graphics.
I also want to be able to drive 3 monitors and I specifically mentioned getting an older card because the best way to avoid graphics issues in Linux is to never use a GPU chipset less than 2 years old. Since my graphics needs are not demanding a nice, used, 2 or 3GB gaming card would be a perfect fit and give me good future proofness. Used, relatively high end graphics cards are dirt cheap.
I keep hardware a long time and I believe that, going forward, many threadedness and relatively powerful graphics are going to be more important than strong single thread performance.


All I can say in response is my A10-5700 ran really well and and I always ran 2 monitors in it in Linux as my main machine and had no issues. I repurposed it into my PLEX box because the graphics are so good without a external card. Ryzen APU are going to be way better than my old A10 so Just saying maybe look into it.

I will be sure to assess my options when I build, it will be awhile, probably this fall. I don't want to buy in too early.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Last fall I replaced Windows with Linux Mint on my youngest daughters laptop and today my eldest gave me her laptop so I could put Linux on it for her too. She had noticed that my youngest just never had computer problems anymore and she was tired of her PC never working right.
Once I figured out how to turn off Secure Boot and turn on legacy mode it went smooth. The wifi works!

So now both my daughters will be running Mint. :)
dv
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Nobody likes an evangelical.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Nobody likes an evangelical.

It's attraction, not promotion.
dv
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Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Nobody likes an evangelical.

It's attraction, not promotion.

That's what they all say. ;)
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Nobody likes an evangelical.

It's attraction, not promotion.

That's what they all say. ;)

Well, I had two successful windows to Linux conversions going so far and now I have a third. My eldest specifically asked me to give her Linux because she had observed her sister having no PC problems anymore while she was stuck dealing with the pain of Windows.
Now a days if you have a non-technical user the kind geek will set them up on Linux or OSX. Windows is simply to technically demanding for the casual, non-expert user. A proper *nix will always be better than what ever the fiddlesticks Windows is.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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If I didn't already have a decent mac, I'd surely be running Linux. Window's might be doing some things better than in the Dark Ages of ME, but it still feels like punching yourself in the face over and over again just to get Windows Update to work just to get some software to run that expects a specific library that is supposed to be there to run.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Metacell posted:
If I didn't already have a decent mac, I'd surely be running Linux. Window's might be doing some things better than in the Dark Ages of ME, but it still feels like punching yourself in the face over and over again just to get Windows Update to work just to get some software to run that expects a specific library that is supposed to be there to run.

Not to mention the whole bit rot problem.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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An interesting sentence at the very end of the Mint Blog:
Quote:
If you’re a fan of the series “Mr Robot” and eagerly awaiting Season 3, keep your eyes peeled the next time you see Elliot on a computer

Elliot has been using Ubuntu but maybe now he will be running Mint?
Also interesting that Clem has inside knowledge of Mr. Robot.
user Stupid cockwomble
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window's?

yer slippin
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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user posted:
window's?

yer slippin

unpossible.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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This years numbers are in:

Top 500 supercomputers based on OS this year:

Linux: 498
Unix: 2
Windows: 0
MacOS: 0

Oh, and the fastest of them all? 10,649,600 cores. I don't even know what to say about that.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Can I still play "Hunt the Wumpus?" from my teletype terminal?
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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I have been lazy lately and only undated to Mint 18.2 a few days ago even though it was released last month. In typical Mint fashion there are no big changes, nothing to make a headline about. Just another iteration with lots and lots of little improvements scattered all over the place. Nothing that jumps out at you.
The xApps project is doing great, the X port of gThumb is a very handy light image editor. Nemo got some multi-threaded goodness, separate processes for plug-ins and the desktop. The same with Cinnamon with applets being separated into their own processes.
This is the 12th iteration of Mint that I have run and it continues to be a real pleasure watching the Mint team work. 5 years of incremental changes really adds up.
Once in awhile I fire up other distros in a live session or watch Youtube vids about other distros but I never see anything that tempts me. Mint is the best distro out there and they are very slowly walking away from the pack.
Vulture 420
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Ok, now that I'm about to be a Linux user in the next coming days, I went with elementary OS just because it looked like a nice simple OS. Has anyone talked about it in these last 23 pages that I won't read?
dv
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Vulture posted:
Ok, now that I'm about to be a Linux user in the next coming days, I went with elementary OS just because it looked like a nice simple OS. Has anyone talked about it in these last 23 pages that I won't read?


There are more Linux distros than there are Linux users. Most of them are 98% the same.

The upside is that Elementary OS is basically Ubuntu with a custom GUI. Not unlike Mint in that regard. So you can always open a terminal and follow any directions written for the Ubuntu CLI.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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There are a bunch of really nice distros out there. Look around and find the distro that suites you best. Lots of good choices available.
Vulture 420
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Obligatory post from the new Linux install.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Vulture posted:
Obligatory post from the new Linux install.

What distro?
Vulture 420
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I installed Elementary OS Loki, which looks like I'm in MacOS except it's bare-bones and feels like I'm alone in a forest with cautiously hiding wildlife. Install was fast and painless, and was on the internet in minutes.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Vulture posted:
I installed Elementary OS Loki, which looks like I'm in MacOS except it's bare-bones and feels like I'm alone in a forest with cautiously hiding wildlife. Install was fast and painless, and was on the internet in minutes.

All the better distros are that easy now, things have come a long way in the last 5 years. Elementary is a great looking distro. I am not a dock fan personally but I have heard nothing but good reviews of Elementary.
Since you are new to Linux you really should try some different desktop environments. I'd recommend for sure checking out MATE, Cinnamon (my fav) and Gnome shell. Nice DEs all but quite different as well. If you don't mind some clutter you can install other DEs side by side and select which to use in the login screen.
Have fun.
Vulture 420
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I feel like it's 1986 and I don't know a thing about computers with Linux, which is exciting. I guess I need to learn this python ?
dv
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Vulture posted:
I feel like it's 1986 and I don't know a thing about computers with Linux, which is exciting. I guess I need to learn this python ?

No. You don't need to learn Python any more than you needed to learn Python to use a Mac.
Vulture 420
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Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.
dv
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Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.


Specific example?

Python is just a programming language that's fairly easy to learn. There are a lot of scripts and applications written in it that are floating around, as well as system utilities. In most cases, all you have to know is how to execute a script from the CLI.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.
dv
User avatar
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
User avatar
If you ever wanted to code, Python is an easy and merciful option, wisely designed to promote good programming habits. It's compatible with just about everything which explains its ubiquitousness. But you shouldn't actually have to learn it other than knowing it needs to be installed (and usually will be already) for a lot of software to work.
Vulture 420
User avatar
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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They usually mean you should know how to run a make file which might be written in python or compile python code, and it might rely on shared or linked libraries not included. That's one thing about *N*X you pretty much have to know, because every distribution is different, and so every binary object code has to be compiled separately. But a properly prepared makefile should automatically locate, download, and install the proper dependencies in the right place.
dv
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Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.


That actually doesn't make a lot of sense. Example?
Pariah Know Your Enemy
User avatar
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.

I have been using Linux exclusively for 5 and a half years and have no idea what you are alluding to. I found switching to Linux so easy I barely learned anything in the process.
Vulture 420
User avatar
Pariah posted:

I have been using Linux exclusively for 5 and a half years and have no idea what you are alluding to. I found switching to Linux so easy I barely learned anything in the process.


I can fully understand that, I tend to do weird stuff if the options are out there to do them.

dv posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.


That actually doesn't make a lot of sense. Example?

Just by chance, I had the option of downloading an app for Mac or Windows, but the Linux download link is "Run from Source Code". I tried that, and gave up. I ended up running the Windows version in Wine (for complex reasons relating to the function of the app itself).

On the other hand, this isn't really what I want to use Linux for (pretend Mac and Windows don't exist), but I do want to explore the benefits of what Linux offers that is not available to Mac and Windows if there is such a thing. If I'm understanding the majority view, my one run-in with python language can be ignored and I should just take it easy and keep exploring. Any suggestions for Linux-Only software that really gets it right? Maybe like this specific niche list: 42 of the Best Free Linux Scientific Software

It would be nice to get this Linux machine set up in every way to emulate something like a Mac machine so a typical user could get everything they needed out of it, minus the things that really sell Apple computers through the OS like iMessages, FaceTime, and whatever else people are addicted to via their iPhones. My favorite thing about Linux right now is that your average person doesn't know about it, doesn't see it as an option, it's Open Source, and I would like to see if I can create a working environment that blows that idea out of the water and see if there will be converts whose eyes have been opened. It feels like it's about time.
dv
User avatar
Oh, I see. Yes, there are certainly software publishers that provide Mac and Windows binaries, and then if you run Linux, they just give you the source code and a pat on the head.

If you restrict your software acquisitions to the Software Center, you should be fine. It's a very app-store-like experience.

The downside is that authorized libraries of software tend to go stale fairly quickly if you don't keep your distro up-to-date. So you then have to either manually install newer software the old fashioned way, or update your distro all the time.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
User avatar
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:

I have been using Linux exclusively for 5 and a half years and have no idea what you are alluding to. I found switching to Linux so easy I barely learned anything in the process.


I can fully understand that, I tend to do weird stuff if the options are out there to do them.

dv posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.


That actually doesn't make a lot of sense. Example?

Just by chance, I had the option of downloading an app for Mac or Windows, but the Linux download link is "Run from Source Code". I tried that, and gave up. I ended up running the Windows version in Wine (for complex reasons relating to the function of the app itself).

On the other hand, this isn't really what I want to use Linux for (pretend Mac and Windows don't exist), but I do want to explore the benefits of what Linux offers that is not available to Mac and Windows if there is such a thing. If I'm understanding the majority view, my one run-in with python language can be ignored and I should just take it easy and keep exploring. Any suggestions for Linux-Only software that really gets it right? Maybe like this specific niche list: 42 of the Best Free Linux Scientific Software

It would be nice to get this Linux machine set up in every way to emulate something like a Mac machine so a typical user could get everything they needed out of it, minus the things that really sell Apple computers through the OS like iMessages, FaceTime, and whatever else people are addicted to via their iPhones. My favorite thing about Linux right now is that your average person doesn't know about it, doesn't see it as an option, it's Open Source, and I would like to see if I can create a working environment that blows that idea out of the water and see if there will be converts whose eyes have been opened. It feels like it's about time.

I have yet to find an end user aimed piece of software that was not offered in deb, rpm and source and there is usually a PPA if you look around some.
The flow chart works like this:
Look in the software manager first if not there...
Look for a PPA, if none...
Look for a deb, if none...
Build from source but no one does that.
Vulture 420
User avatar
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:

I have been using Linux exclusively for 5 and a half years and have no idea what you are alluding to. I found switching to Linux so easy I barely learned anything in the process.


I can fully understand that, I tend to do weird stuff if the options are out there to do them.

dv posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.


That actually doesn't make a lot of sense. Example?

Just by chance, I had the option of downloading an app for Mac or Windows, but the Linux download link is "Run from Source Code". I tried that, and gave up. I ended up running the Windows version in Wine (for complex reasons relating to the function of the app itself).

On the other hand, this isn't really what I want to use Linux for (pretend Mac and Windows don't exist), but I do want to explore the benefits of what Linux offers that is not available to Mac and Windows if there is such a thing. If I'm understanding the majority view, my one run-in with python language can be ignored and I should just take it easy and keep exploring. Any suggestions for Linux-Only software that really gets it right? Maybe like this specific niche list: 42 of the Best Free Linux Scientific Software

It would be nice to get this Linux machine set up in every way to emulate something like a Mac machine so a typical user could get everything they needed out of it, minus the things that really sell Apple computers through the OS like iMessages, FaceTime, and whatever else people are addicted to via their iPhones. My favorite thing about Linux right now is that your average person doesn't know about it, doesn't see it as an option, it's Open Source, and I would like to see if I can create a working environment that blows that idea out of the water and see if there will be converts whose eyes have been opened. It feels like it's about time.

I have yet to find an end user aimed piece of software that was not offered in deb, rpm and source and there is usually a PPA if you look around some.
The flow chart works like this:
Look in the software manager first if not there...
Look for a PPA, if none...
Look for a deb, if none...
Build from source but no one does that.

Now you're speaking Chinese to me man, no clue what any of that is. This is where that whole learning stuff thing seems to be needed.
dv
User avatar
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:

I have been using Linux exclusively for 5 and a half years and have no idea what you are alluding to. I found switching to Linux so easy I barely learned anything in the process.


I can fully understand that, I tend to do weird stuff if the options are out there to do them.

dv posted:
Vulture posted:
Pariah posted:
dv posted:
Pariah posted:
Vulture posted:
Linux just feels like it's so barren that half the time that something is available for Mac and Windows, the Linux option is something I don't understand because it's all about python instead of just point and click.

I need to point out that you selected a distro that follows the Gnome Apple philosophy of removing features in the name of ease of use. You might find a full featured DE like Cinnamon to be more to your liking.


FTFY ;)

Equally true.

What I meant was that when I'm on The Internet, and things are only available for Mac and Windows, there is either no Linux version or there is some folder I can download that requires I learn python to some degree. As far as removing features, I'm not seeing any problems like that.


That actually doesn't make a lot of sense. Example?

Just by chance, I had the option of downloading an app for Mac or Windows, but the Linux download link is "Run from Source Code". I tried that, and gave up. I ended up running the Windows version in Wine (for complex reasons relating to the function of the app itself).

On the other hand, this isn't really what I want to use Linux for (pretend Mac and Windows don't exist), but I do want to explore the benefits of what Linux offers that is not available to Mac and Windows if there is such a thing. If I'm understanding the majority view, my one run-in with python language can be ignored and I should just take it easy and keep exploring. Any suggestions for Linux-Only software that really gets it right? Maybe like this specific niche list: 42 of the Best Free Linux Scientific Software

It would be nice to get this Linux machine set up in every way to emulate something like a Mac machine so a typical user could get everything they needed out of it, minus the things that really sell Apple computers through the OS like iMessages, FaceTime, and whatever else people are addicted to via their iPhones. My favorite thing about Linux right now is that your average person doesn't know about it, doesn't see it as an option, it's Open Source, and I would like to see if I can create a working environment that blows that idea out of the water and see if there will be converts whose eyes have been opened. It feels like it's about time.

I have yet to find an end user aimed piece of software that was not offered in deb, rpm and source and there is usually a PPA if you look around some.
The flow chart works like this:
Look in the software manager first if not there...
Look for a PPA, if none...
Look for a deb, if none...
Build from source but no one does that.

Now you're speaking Chinese to me man, no clue what any of that is. This is where that whole learning stuff thing seems to be needed.


Translation:

Software manager = App Store
PPA = a third party URL you can add to the software manager to get software from additional sources.
deb = like a .pkg (installer package) on the mac.
build from source = compiling it (nobody does that.)
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