RIP Sir Clive Sinclair

How's life?
Post Reply
User avatar
Yori
Posts: 1239
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 6:33 pm
Title: Program
Location: The other side of the screen

RIP Sir Clive Sinclair

Post by Yori »

Sir Clive Sinclair: Computing pioneer dies aged 81

Inventor Sir Clive Sinclair, who popularised the home computer and invented the pocket calculator, has died at his London home aged 81.

His daughter Belinda Sinclair said he passed away on Thursday morning after having cancer for more than a decade.

Sir Clive's products included the ZX series of computers and his ill-fated C5 electric vehicle.

I have fond memories of the ZX Spectrum computers. I had both the 48k and 128k versions back in the day.

User avatar
ukimalefu
Posts: 46649
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:52 pm
Title: Screen toucher
Contact:

Post by ukimalefu »

:(

A Sinclair ZX81 was the first computer in my family.

I got free software from magazines... I had to copy the BASIC code by hand.

I thought using audio cassettes for data storage was amazing.

Mazogs was a great game.

User avatar
ukimalefu
Posts: 46649
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:52 pm
Title: Screen toucher
Contact:

Post by ukimalefu »

An electric vehicle pioneer too (I didn't know this before, I just found it)

Image
Image

https://youtu.be/0EQetm_qWDg

User avatar
TOS
Posts: 40374
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2013 5:48 pm

Post by TOS »

aw, i remember wanting a sinclair so bad! their fan base was legendary

"TOS ain’t havin no horserace round here. “Policies” is the coin of the realm." -- iDaemon
User avatar
ukimalefu
Posts: 46649
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:52 pm
Title: Screen toucher
Contact:

Post by ukimalefu »

Image

After spending several years as assistant editor of Instrument Practice, Sinclair founded Sinclair Radionics in 1961, where he produced the first slim-line electronic pocket calculator in 1972 (the Sinclair Executive). Sinclair later moved into the production of home computers and produced the Sinclair ZX80, the UK's first mass-market home computer for less than £100, and later, with Sinclair Research, the ZX81 and ZX Spectrum. The latter is widely recognised by consumers and programmers for its importance in the early days of the British and wider European home computer industry. In Eastern Europe homemade ZX Spectrum clones were the only affordable computing equipment for a long period till the mid 1990s.⁣

User avatar
ukimalefu
Posts: 46649
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:52 pm
Title: Screen toucher
Contact:

Post by ukimalefu »

You can play Zx games here

https://www.zx-gaming.co.uk/

My keyboard keys didn't do what I expected, I tried both spanish ISO and US layouts... now that I think about it, I didn't try a british keyboard layout.

But I eventually found the keys to to move around in Mazogs. So the games are playable on Chrome/MacOS mojave

User avatar
Yori
Posts: 1239
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 6:33 pm
Title: Program
Location: The other side of the screen

Post by Yori »

This is my emulator of choice: Retro Virtual Machine

It does all 3 Amstrad CPC models, all 3 Spectrum models (+2 and +3 are lumped together), plus a couple of Spectrum clones.
It also has emulation for several different types of screens, handy for some Amstrad CPC games and demos where they programmed the CRTC to create custom resolutions (Arkanoid is a good example as they used vertical overscan to replicate the aspect ratio of the arcade machine, which none of the other 8-bit or even 16-bit conversions did).

RVMv2 emulates all video signal generation at low level, virtual machines generate H-Sync V-Sync signals as well as the video signal.
The virtual monitor is responsible for displaying the final image, also emulates the mix of frames that is usually produced in an interlaced signal.
RVMv2 also uses the correct pixel aspect ratio. In the analog world there is nothing exactly square

They have versions for macOS, Windows and Linux.

Image

User avatar
ukimalefu
Posts: 46649
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:52 pm
Title: Screen toucher
Contact:

Post by ukimalefu »

Image

Post Reply