is boeing back?

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faa clears 737 max for return to flight after 20-month grounding

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FAA Administrator Steve Dickson after ungrounding the plane said a repeat of the conditions in both crashes is now “impossible” thanks to design and training changes.


Quote:
“We will never forget the lives lost in the two tragic accidents that led to the decision to suspend operations,” Boeing’s CEO David Calhoun said in a statement. “These events and the lessons we have learned as a result have reshaped our company and further focused our attention on our core values of safety, quality and integrity.”

The end of the 20-month flight ban also gives Boeing the chance to start handing over the roughly 450 Max jetliners it has produced but has been unable to deliver to customers after regulators ordered airlines to stop flying them in March 2019. Boeing shares were little changed in afternoon trading after on the FAA’s decision, which was expected.

Boeing has a backlog of more than 3,000 other Boeing 737 Max planes, when stripping out orders that the manufacturer believes could be cancelled. That tally has declined as the lengthy grounding coupled with the coronavirus pandemic prompted customers to call off hundreds of orders.


pretty lousy timing, considering the shape the airlines are in right now ... what's the way forward for boeing?
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Good question, since they are getting hammered in commercial aviation by Airbus and space by SpaceX. They do still have a ton of planes that need maintenance and parts, but they are seriously behind the 8-ball right now.

Particularly since the FAA green-lit the 737-Max as a new type, which means pilots will have to certify on it separately. This was the whole reason why the MCAS was created in the first place, as the lack of recertification was where airlines could save enough money to swing the decision. So, Boeing now has a plane with an exceptionally poor track record AND that plane will cost more than the comparable Airbus offerings.
The 787 and 777 are still string performers for them, though there is an issue with the engines in some of the 787s that I suspect has helped decline some of the transition to Airbus among Asian airlines. Discount airlines is Asia invested heavily in 787s, while the higher-end carriers use mostly 777s (or still 747s in a few cases like Korean Airlines).
jkahless Custom Title
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Isn’t something like half their income from the military? They’re too big to fail, worst case they restructure, do mass layoffs, some golden parachutes, and continue on with just the little people getting hurt.
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is boeing back?