Gift ideas for a cook

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Malkin kick 'em in the face; taste the body
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My friend's birthday is in a month, and I'm trying to think of gift ideas for him. He loves to cook and is doing a bit more baking now with quarantine (getting into sourdough).

What's a must have kitchen item that you love? I'd like to avoid single use items, but would consider such a gadget if it were really cool.

He's super messy, so I keep looking at Prepdeck but there's absolutely no way I'd buy it unless it were at least half the price. (Just doesn't look like the quality is there.)

Would also consider kitchen garden ideas.

Thanks in advance!
A whisk with an open bottom will not trap a blob inside. Pick your brand. This is merely the first image I found. Mine has metal spheres on the ends which I suspect would be a better choice for long term wear.

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macnuke Afar
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https://www.amazon.com/ChefsChoice-ProntoPro-Sharpener-Sharpening-Euro-American/dp/B007IVBET0/?tag=gearbeacon-20

I like it for a fast quick sharp on any knife in the kitchen.

I use the slow method also, but for handy dandy, this one is tough to beat.


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jkahless Custom Title
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An accurate digital scale, a few stainless mixing bowls (cheap if you buy them from a resteraunt supplier), a stainless steel bench scraper and a couple bowl scrapers (nylon for preference, the poly ones are too soft to use for many tasks) are the basic tools that separate a pro baker from the amateur. Any of those would be great, and relatively inexpensive. You should buy yourself some scrapers too, they’re amazingly useful.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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A KitcheAid stand mixer! :D
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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These are my 3 most used utensils. All from Pampered Chef Image

Also, if he doesn't have a hand mixer with a variety of attachments, that would be good. And right now, Costco has a set of 3 T Fal frying pans for $25
obvs To hell with toilet paper. I own a bidet
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Cooking is my biggest hobby, and I have all of the appliances(!)(although not that wisk. I should probably buy one of those).

For me personally, these are the things which really helped step up my game in the kitchen:
  1. My food processor(and then later, the second one I bought of the same model, just so I could quickly switch out the blending bowl/blade/lid and keep going preparing a different mixture without having to do dishes first, and which gave me a spare base in my closet in case the first one breaks) - Used ones can often be gotten for cheap on ebay. I bought one in 2011 for about $350, but bought the same model of one as a backup this year for like $40. And just to be clear, I have had zero problems with this thing ever, and see no indication of any kind of problem. The backup is a bonus, and just got it because it was cheaper to buy it with the blade/bowl/lid than to buy them separately.
  2. My Foodsaver vacuum sealer, which made it much easier to preserve food, including mixes, meats, marinades, and yadda yadda yadda. It also makes it possible to reseal almost all bags. Chip bags, pasta bags, buying in bulk, all kinds of packages, et cetera. Not very expensive, and something that pays for itself within the first year or two anyway.
  3. New good-quality knives(something that helps anyone in the kitchen)
  4. Really nice custom cutting boards(and for instance, I got one that takes up one entire counter out of the three counter spaces I have)

I also bought myself an Allspice spice rack, but that might be a little expensive.
jkahless Custom Title
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A classic vintage cook book.

My copy dates from the early 50s.

From delicate pastries to preparing venison. Just reading random pages from it is a wonder of simplicity and time tested wisdom.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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TOS
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justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Done if the things were suggesting are probably out of her budget, line the stand mixer I suggested, good knives and the Food Saver, all of which I have and very expensive for gifts.
Malkin kick 'em in the face; taste the body
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Yeah, I probably don't want to spend more than $50.

He's got a lot of the suggestions already, which means you all are on the right track! Of course he just bought himself a new digital scale like two weeks ago...

Keep the ideas coming! At the very least, this stuff is always fun to look at. :)
jkahless Custom Title
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A half dozen utility paring knives is surprisingly handy.
jkahless Custom Title
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This is a great knife for about $50. A little different than your normal chefs knife.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/ki ... hefs-knife
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Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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There is only one choice: Onion goggles!

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DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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justine Elitist Beer Lover
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jkahless posted:
This is a great knife for about $50. A little different than your normal chefs knife.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/ki ... hefs-knife


Ugh. Lee Valley! You are a very bad man. (I will end up looking at that damn website for hours now!)
jkahless Custom Title
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Warin posted:
jkahless posted:
This is a great knife for about $50. A little different than your normal chefs knife.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/ki ... hefs-knife


Ugh. Lee Valley! You are a very bad man. (I will end up looking at that damn website for hours now!)


Don’t worry, I’m suffering for my sins too...

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/ki ... ning-steel

These style microhones are great.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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For salt, go to Jacobsen Salt co. Some great stuff there.

Maybe you can put together a basket? Garlic Oil from Costco. Jacobsen infused salts. Utensils.
jkahless Custom Title
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Typically, I rarely use fancy ingredients people get me. I have been given so many random bottles of jam and weird spice rubs over the years... I think tools are a safer bet unless youre sure he uses the type of ingredient you’re giving him, or loves novel ingredients. I might just be a stick in the mud.
Just cut the onion underwater and the tearing problem is solved. That's only necessary for the strongest onions. Typically just wetting them down after every cut is enough to solve the problem.
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I have giggles. It's easier to just use the goggles.
jkahless Custom Title
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I use fresh onions and a sharp knife. I only get misty eyed if I use a punch to dice a few liters of onions. I’m probably dead inside.
I got a set of Kyocera ceramic bladed knives as a "gift" from one of my company's suppliers. They are astoundingly sharp. They almost cut the food before the blade even makes contact. They are ridiculous.

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Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv
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A nice rolling pin? If they've only recently gotten into baking, they may not even have one, and a stainless/stone one is beautiful just from a "put it on the counter and look at it" standpoint.

Usually well under $50 too.
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I also love French rolling pins. Marble ones are great for chilled doughs, you can refrigerate them first.
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Gift ideas for a cook