little richard. r.i.p.

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macnuke Afar
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Rock n rolled right to the end .
ukimalefu Canadized
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Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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RIP to the true King of Rock-n-Roll.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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I remember about 10+ years ago I decided to make a play list of the early Rock n Roll.
Little Richard, Elvis (Sun records era), Bill Haley & the Comets, Chuck Berry, Ike Turner, Johnny Burnette, etc.
People can argue all they like about "who" invented it, but it has been clear to me that it wasn't one thing and not one source, but several streams colliding together from various places--it was black meats white, rural meets urban, south meets north, country/western meets jump blues.

Anyway, one thing that becomes glaringly clear listening to Little Richard's early versions of his big hits (he re-recorded them a couple years later and they are sub par) is how raw they are, how he completely and unabashedly takes bawdy juke-joint lyric and subjects and brings them to a broad and mixed audience.

I am amazed when I see those clips of him in the mid 1950s, standing at the piano looking right into the camera with the eyeliner and his hair piled high, shouting lyrics about how Miss Molly sure likes to fiddlesticks.
OK maybe the white people tuning in didn't know what "ball" and "rockin' and a rollin" meant, but the rest of the words spell it out.
I can see why that (and other R&R performers) caused a severe generational split.

Yeah, sure, the moms and dads didn't much care for the crude backbeat and melodies, but the real thing that scared the human waste out of them was this crazy beautiful looking black man shouting about lust and unfaithful uncles having a good time with the town pump.
And what the hell did a womp bop a loo bop a womp bam boom mean? Probably sex.
dv
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Séamas posted:
I remember about 10+ years ago I decided to make a play list of the early Rock n Roll.
Little Richard, Elvis (Sun records era), Bill Haley & the Comets, Chuck Berry, Ike Turner, Johnny Burnette, etc.
People can argue all they like about "who" invented it, but it has been clear to me that it wasn't one thing and not one source, but several streams colliding together from various places--it was black meats white, rural meets urban, south meets north, country/western meets jump blues.

Anyway, one thing that becomes glaringly clear listening to Little Richard's early versions of his big hits (he re-recorded them a couple years later and they are sub par) is how raw they are, how he completely and unabashedly takes bawdy juke-joint lyric and subjects and brings them to a broad and mixed audience.

I am amazed when I see those clips of him in the mid 1950s, standing at the piano looking right into the camera with the eyeliner and his hair piled high, shouting lyrics about how Miss Molly sure likes to fiddlesticks.
OK maybe the white people tuning in didn't know what "ball" and "rockin' and a rollin" meant, but the rest of the words spell it out.
I can see why that (and other R&R performers) caused a severe generational split.

Yeah, sure, the moms and dads didn't much care for the crude backbeat and melodies, but the real thing that scared the human waste out of them was this crazy beautiful looking black man shouting about lust and unfaithful uncles having a good time with the town pump.
And what the hell did a womp bop a loo bop a womp bam boom mean? Probably sex.


It's ironic that he became one of those tisk-tisking moralists.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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dv posted:
Séamas posted:
I remember about 10+ years ago I decided to make a play list of the early Rock n Roll.
Little Richard, Elvis (Sun records era), Bill Haley & the Comets, Chuck Berry, Ike Turner, Johnny Burnette, etc.
People can argue all they like about "who" invented it, but it has been clear to me that it wasn't one thing and not one source, but several streams colliding together from various places--it was black meats white, rural meets urban, south meets north, country/western meets jump blues.

Anyway, one thing that becomes glaringly clear listening to Little Richard's early versions of his big hits (he re-recorded them a couple years later and they are sub par) is how raw they are, how he completely and unabashedly takes bawdy juke-joint lyric and subjects and brings them to a broad and mixed audience.

I am amazed when I see those clips of him in the mid 1950s, standing at the piano looking right into the camera with the eyeliner and his hair piled high, shouting lyrics about how Miss Molly sure likes to fiddlesticks.
OK maybe the white people tuning in didn't know what "ball" and "rockin' and a rollin" meant, but the rest of the words spell it out.
I can see why that (and other R&R performers) caused a severe generational split.

Yeah, sure, the moms and dads didn't much care for the crude backbeat and melodies, but the real thing that scared the human waste out of them was this crazy beautiful looking black man shouting about lust and unfaithful uncles having a good time with the town pump.
And what the hell did a womp bop a loo bop a womp bam boom mean? Probably sex.


It's ironic that he became one of those tisk-tisking moralists.



He went back and forth between those two modes frequently.
jkahless Custom Title
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dv posted:
Séamas posted:
I remember about 10+ years ago I decided to make a play list of the early Rock n Roll.
Little Richard, Elvis (Sun records era), Bill Haley & the Comets, Chuck Berry, Ike Turner, Johnny Burnette, etc.
People can argue all they like about "who" invented it, but it has been clear to me that it wasn't one thing and not one source, but several streams colliding together from various places--it was black meats white, rural meets urban, south meets north, country/western meets jump blues.

Anyway, one thing that becomes glaringly clear listening to Little Richard's early versions of his big hits (he re-recorded them a couple years later and they are sub par) is how raw they are, how he completely and unabashedly takes bawdy juke-joint lyric and subjects and brings them to a broad and mixed audience.

I am amazed when I see those clips of him in the mid 1950s, standing at the piano looking right into the camera with the eyeliner and his hair piled high, shouting lyrics about how Miss Molly sure likes to fiddlesticks.
OK maybe the white people tuning in didn't know what "ball" and "rockin' and a rollin" meant, but the rest of the words spell it out.
I can see why that (and other R&R performers) caused a severe generational split.

Yeah, sure, the moms and dads didn't much care for the crude backbeat and melodies, but the real thing that scared the human waste out of them was this crazy beautiful looking black man shouting about lust and unfaithful uncles having a good time with the town pump.
And what the hell did a womp bop a loo bop a womp bam boom mean? Probably sex.


It's ironic that he became one of those tisk-tisking moralists.


Less ironic than tragically understandable. He was beaten for being queer as a child, and that shame and abuse followed him his whole life.
iDaemon infinitely loopy
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There’s a promo photo I saw on twitter from Hamburg Germany 1962 with the 4 Beatles around a seated Little Richard. They were the opening act for him.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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iDaemon posted:
There’s a promo photo I saw on twitter from Hamburg Germany 1962 with the 4 Beatles around a seated Little Richard. They were the opening act for him.



Yeah, He says he taught Paul the "whooo", but I think Paul had already studied Little Richard's "whoooooooo" pretty thoroughly by then.

That would have been their triumphant return to Hamburg--and during this set of shows they first met Billy Preston who was Little Richard's organist.
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little richard. r.i.p.