Thinking about getting Sonos speakers?

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Sonos permanently bricks older speaker models claiming "recycling".

My understanding--not having dealt with Sonos at all--is that two advantages their speaker systems have (given an appropriate central controller) are that:
1) the collection of wireless speakers can be controlled to deliver different sounds via WiFi to different rooms, and
2) with time and effort the audio experience with a Sonos system can be "sculpted" for a given room and its contents.

BUT Sonos has a "Trade-Up" program which began around Halloween 2019. To use it, a user with older Sonos speakers can buy current speakers with up to a 30% discount BUT a timer is involved: that user has 21 days to continue to use the old speaker involved in that discount after which it becomes permanently bricked. While Sonos suggests that the old speaker can be recycled, actually all it could be used for is be stripped for a few parts for very limited repairs.

Before beginning their trade-up program Sonos' own claim was that 92% of all registered speakers were still in use, so they are long-lasting.

There are reports of people buying traded-up Sonos speakers only to have them become bricked, and other reports of people who have had their own older speakers being bricked despite never having used Sonos' trade-up program.
Sounds sketchy. I think a few people here use them tho.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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The problem is that they are lasting too long. This is a great way to "solve that problem".

However, while it does suck from a reusability standpoint, the owner is getting a discount on new speakers by "trading in" the old ones. The bricking is apparently in lieu of mailing them back to Sonos.
Malkin kick 'em in the face; taste the body
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Our society's values are seriously stick fiddled up.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Malkin posted:
Our society's values are seriously stick fiddled up.


Yup. :goth:
macnuke Afar
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"There is no profit in a cure."


kinda runs true everywhere.
dv
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Ugh.

Meanwhile, those 40 year old speakers at the Goodwill still work fine. Buy those.
juice Inadvertently correct
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It is better to end than mend
Sonos declares that anyone still using any "legacy" gear with contemporary ones will not be able to update their software.

It is understandable that the company can refuse to update software just for older units, but to set up things such that if a user has just one piece of "legacy" gear then ALL of it cannot have their software updated...well, I had never heard of Sonos before posting that original post which alone was enough to put the company on my do-not-even-consider list, so this just further solidifies that placement. It is such that if any salesman just mentions Sonos to me then I will just walk out on him.
ukimalefu last throes
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disconnect old one, update, connect old one again?

the computer I'm using right now, and its software, get no updates, but it still works... :paranoid: :fingers crossed, knocks on wood:
ukimalefu posted:
disconnect old one, update, connect old one again?

[snip]

Sure, but given Sonos' attitude I suspect that their answer to anyone doing this would be something like have all the hardware report back to some unit and have any unit without a current update do something annoying like play a constant but clearly audible tone when reconnected: "Oh, that sound just means you have to update to a newer version!"
Or maybe it cannot be reconnected?
That sounds like an excellent reason to never buy their stuff again. There's got to be alternatives that work as well and don't do pull that crap.
Post-deprecated age-use separation from the up-flow channel support stream mitigates against sub-optimal / non-funtional modalities in mixed-SKU end-user use-cases.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ribtor posted:
Post-deprecated age-use separation from the up-flow channel support stream mitigates against sub-optimal / non-funtional modalities in mixed-SKU end-user use-cases.


Image
CEO of Sonos apologizes for "confusion" over software updates for legacy products.

He claims that in May 2020 there will be software updates which should cover all products including legacy gear despite previous claims by the company that such legacy products already are too old to work with some updates.
Sonos decides to stop bricking old devices.

The company will still stop issuing software updates for its oldest products beginning in May 2020.
juice Inadvertently correct
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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The problem here wasn't that Sonos necessarily did anything "wrong", other than trying to externalize the costs to their customers. Rather, it's that they underestimated how people would feel about intentionally bricking a perfectly good device. I think most folks don't realize that a lot of companies just shred or trash items that they mail in for trades. (That would be you, Apple...)

It's a lot like the Tektronix scope sitting in one of the laboratories I use. It came fully loaded with every option sold for that model. Maximum memory, analysis options, etc. We only paid for a few of them, but they are all there, locked away by the software. That is STILL irksome, even though I understand it is probably cheaper for the company to make a single model and do "upgrades" by codes.

It's not about reality, it's about slimy it feels.
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Thinking about getting Sonos speakers?