University students ditch their smartphones for a week

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Source. This was part of a school course designed to break people of their smartphone addictions.
Quote:
Seven days later, “who’s excited they’re getting their phones back today?” Professor Donna Freitas asked.

Gone were the nerves and the shakes.

“Everything is perfect right now. I’m having a lot better relationships… it’s a stress free environment no pressure about social media,” Jacob Dannenberg said.

“I think it’s really refreshing and relaxing… I was able to fall asleep a lot easier,” student Adrianna Cigliano.

They managed to find their way, even without GPS for a week.

“I just had to take the same route everywhere,” one student joked.

They were also more productive.

“Doing homework was 100 percent easier. I got it done faster, I was in the zone,” Cigliano said.

Prof. Freitas says it’s important for everyone to assess their addiction.

“Are the conveniences worth it because the drawback are pretty significant,” Freitas said.

“The fact that no one can focus, that my students can’t sleep… They feel bad about themselves because of social media, the list goes on and on.”

The sweet reunions went sour quickly as endless notifications piled up.

“Oh my God this is so bad!… I just want to shut it off now!” the Adelphi class said.

Students say they’re not quite breaking up with their phones, but promise the relationship will change.

“I want to keep that balance and figure out the healthy relationship that we deserve to have with our phones,” Cigliano added.

“My screen time is definitely going to go down and I’m going start to appreciate my surroundings more because usually I’m looking at my screen all the time,” Ashley Castillero said.

Students told CBS2 they look forward to living more in the moment, with their heads up more often, notifications off, and the “do not disturb” on.

Pariah Know Your Enemy
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The same stupid blatherskite with every technological advance:
Radios were going to ruin a generation, no wait, telephones will, no wait, TV will, or portable music players.
I bet if you looked hard enough you would find dire predictions of distracted and disconnected youths because of the advent of cheap, pocket friendly paperback books.
dv
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Pariah posted:
The same stupid blatherskite with every technological advance:
Radios were going to ruin a generation, no wait, telephones will, no wait, TV will, or portable music players.
I bet if you looked hard enough you would find dire predictions of distracted and disconnected youths because of the advent of cheap, pocket friendly paperback books.


Or even just "literacy."

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1636/163 ... #2H_4_0002

Quote:
SOCRATES: At the Egyptian city of Naucratis, there was a famous old god, whose name was Theuth; the bird which is called the Ibis is sacred to him, and he was the inventor of many arts, such as arithmetic and calculation and geometry and astronomy and draughts and dice, but his great discovery was the use of letters. Now in those days the god Thamus was the king of the whole country of Egypt; and he dwelt in that great city of Upper Egypt which the Hellenes call Egyptian Thebes, and the god himself is called by them Ammon. To him came Theuth and showed his inventions, desiring that the other Egyptians might be allowed to have the benefit of them; he enumerated them, and Thamus enquired about their several uses, and praised some of them and censured others, as he approved or disapproved of them. It would take a long time to repeat all that Thamus said to Theuth in praise or blame of the various arts. But when they came to letters, This, said Theuth, will make the Egyptians wiser and give them better memories; it is a specific both for the memory and for the wit. Thamus replied: O most ingenious Theuth, the parent or inventor of an art is not always the best judge of the utility or inutility of his own inventions to the users of them. And in this instance, you who are the father of letters, from a paternal love of your own children have been led to attribute to them a quality which they cannot have; for this discovery of yours will create forgetfulness in the learners' souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves. The specific which you have discovered is an aid not to memory, but to reminiscence, and you give your disciples not truth, but only the semblance of truth; they will be hearers of many things and will have learned nothing; they will appear to be omniscient and will generally know nothing; they will be tiresome company, having the show of wisdom without the reality.

maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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The problem is that these arguments, and in particular the example you quoted, aren't necessarily wrong. There is a huge gulf between "book knowledge" and "actual knowledge". On the flip side, however, you often need book knowledge to bootstrap real knowledge, so in that case, Ammon was both right and wrong at the same time.
Let's not assume technologically changed generations aren't damaged.

We human waste where we eat and we're burning our house down around us all while we claim to know better. Technology is accelerating the very damage that we think it is supposed to solve.

I would say insanity is an indicator of damage.
Pariah posted:
The same stupid blatherskite with every technological advance:
Radios were going to ruin a generation, no wait, telephones will, no wait, TV will, or portable music players.
I bet if you looked hard enough you would find dire predictions of distracted and disconnected youths because of the advent of cheap, pocket friendly paperback books.

Um, you did read some of the students' reactions AFTER that week was over, yes?
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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DEyncourt posted:
Pariah posted:
The same stupid blatherskite with every technological advance:
Radios were going to ruin a generation, no wait, telephones will, no wait, TV will, or portable music players.
I bet if you looked hard enough you would find dire predictions of distracted and disconnected youths because of the advent of cheap, pocket friendly paperback books.

Um, you did read some of the students' reactions AFTER that week was over, yes?

Students know they are expected to come up with some sort of revelation so they manufacture one.
Another such exercise:
Quote:
[In 2014] I offered [my students] extra credit if they would give me their phones for nine days and write about living without them. Twelve students—about a third of the class—took me up on the offer. What they wrote was remarkable, and remarkably consistent. These university students, given the chance to say what they felt, didn’t gracefully submit to the tech industry and its devices.

The usual industry and education narrative about cell phones, social media, and digital technology generally is that they build community, foster communication, and increase efficiency, thus improving our lives. Mark Zuckerberg’s recent reformulation of Facebook’s mission statement is typical: the company aims to “give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.”

Without their phones, most of my students initially felt lost, disoriented, frustrated, and even frightened. That seemed to support the industry narrative: look how disconnected and lonely you’ll be without our technology. But after just two weeks, the majority began to think that their cell phones were in fact limiting their relationships with other people, compromising their own lives, and somehow cutting them off from the “real” world.

BUT the professor's own reaction:
Quote:
I first carried out this exercise in 2014. I repeated it last year in the bigger, more urban institution where I now teach. The occasion this time wasn’t a failed test; it was my despair over the classroom experience in its entirety. I want to be clear here—this is not personal. I have a real fondness for my students as people. But they’re abysmal students; or rather, they aren’t really students at all, at least not in my class. On any given day, 70% of them are sitting before me shopping, texting, completing assignments, watching videos, or otherwise occupying themselves. Even the “good” students do this. No one’s even trying to conceal the activity, the way students did before. This is just what they do.

I think my students are being entirely rational when they “distract” themselves in my class with their phones. They understand the world they are being prepared to enter much better than I do. In that world, I’m the distraction, not their phones or their social-media profiles or their networking. Yet for what I’m supposed to be doing—educating and cultivating young hearts and minds—the consequences are pretty dark.

What’s changed? Most of what they wrote in the assignment echoed the papers I’d received in 2014. The phones were compromising their relationships, cutting them off from real things, and distracting them from more important matters. But there were two notable differences. First, for these students, even the simplest activities—getting on the bus or train, ordering dinner, getting up in the morning, even knowing where they were—required their cell phones. As the phone grew more ubiquitous in their lives, their fear of being without it seemed to grow apace. They were jittery, lost, without them.

This may help to explain the second difference: compared with the first batch, this second group displayed a fatalism about phones. Tina’s concluding remarks described it well: “Without cell phones life would be simple and real but we may not be able to cope with the world and our society. After a few days I felt alright without the phone as I got used to it. But I guess it is only fine if it is for a short period of time. One cannot hope to compete efficiently in life without a convenient source of communication that is our phones.” Compare this admission with the reaction of Peter, who a few months after the course in 2014 tossed his smartphone into a river.

Paula was about 28, a little older than most students in the class. She’d returned to college with a real desire to learn after working for almost a decade following high school. I’ll never forget the morning she gave a presentation to a class that was even more alternatively engaged than usual. After it was all over, she looked at me in despair and said, simply: “How in the world do you do this?”

I've been much happier after I deleted Facebook from my phone.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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The earliest technical advancement I am aware of that was blamed for the dysfunction of youth was the introduction of the cheap, paperback book. Since then recorded music, radio, the telephone, TV, portable music players and video games of any sort and on and on.
Every new communication technology has been greeted with this sort of reaction.
But most people (I think) like me don't have a landline, and therefore, further cutting themselves off the grid than in the past even by not having their cell. Not a fair experiment.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Yeah, ditching a cell phone these days is more like going full Ted Kaczynski than "taking a break". We haven't had a land line at the house in over 10 years, after I realized I was paying $35 a month for telemarketing calls.

Maybe ditching Facebook for a week would be reasonable (and healthy), but cell phones are the land lines of the modern era.
wellfleation posted:
But most people (I think) like me don't have a landline, and therefore, further cutting themselves off the grid than in the past even by not having their cell. Not a fair experiment.

maurvir posted:
Yeah, ditching a cell phone these days is more like going full Ted Kaczynski than "taking a break". We haven't had a land line at the house in over 10 years, after I realized I was paying $35 a month for telemarketing calls.

Maybe ditching Facebook for a week would be reasonable (and healthy), but cell phones are the land lines of the modern era.

BUT, on the other hand, how often do you use your smartphone AS a phone?

I don't know if Android has an equivalent app, but the most recent versions of iOS have ScreenTime which actually does record how much time you have used your iPhone with each app.

Well, if you DO turn ScreenTime on. I had mine running for a while but about a month ago I turned it off because it wasn't telling me anything I didn't already know: I spend most of my smartphone time playing podcasts when I am not reading an e-book (then it becomes closer to 33:67 in favor of reading), but over any 24-hour period my iPhone time is only 2-5 hours and practically all of that being podcast-listening or e-book-reading. Excluding that time, my iPhone time drops to under 10 minutes per day with practically none of that using my iPhone as just a phone (well, excluding when I had spent hours talking to Apple Support about my sundry iPhone 7 problems, and those were hardly daily occurences).

I'll grant you the inclusion of any Messaging time into that "phone-only" time, even allowing tripling that time because with messaging you do not have to engage with your correspondent with chit-chat.

There is that worry of "what if an emergency happens and I do not have my smartphone to call 911?" I had even done that with my mom, reminding her to take her iPhone with her just in case. But considering the near-ubiquity of smartphones nowadays, how likely is it that no one in a crowd of 5 or more would not make that call instead of you? And isn't that "worry" above just playing into the narrative of how your smartphone is now essential?

I also recognize that I am by far an exception to the general rule:
I NEVER had a Facebook account.
I stopped going to my Twitter account in mid-2018 (and even before then I never accessed Twitter on my iPhone).
I generally don't play games on my iPhone (though any suggestions welcome here).

AND of course none of these are accessible via a landline phone (unless you are still using a phone modem).
Old Yoda agitator
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DEyncourt posted:
I also recognize that I am by far an exception to the general rule:

In 1975 when I first moved to this farm there was no phone line, no CB radio and could only get one TV channel with a 30ft antenna.

Late in 2005 got satellite internet.
Early 2006 got land line telephone at a cost of ~$280,000 (not to me, but that's another story.)
Early 2017 got a $5 TracFone to use as a walkie-talkie when one of us is away and road emergencies. No cell signal within 8 miles.

Have very little sympathy for any one that can't ditch their phone for a week or so.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Old Yoda posted:
DEyncourt posted:
I also recognize that I am by far an exception to the general rule:

In 1975 when I first moved to this farm there was no phone line, no CB radio and could only get one TV channel with a 30ft antenna.

Late in 2005 got satellite internet.
Early 2006 got land line telephone at a cost of ~$280,000 (not to me, but that's another story.)
Early 2017 got a $5 TracFone to use as a walkie-talkie when one of us is away and road emergencies. No cell signal within 8 miles.

Have very little sympathy for any one that can't ditch their phone for a week or so.

If I ditched my phone I would have to buy:
An alarm clock.
A small flashlight.
A bunch of maps for my car, if I can find them.
Portable radio to take with and a weather alert radio for at home..
News papers and magazines.
A timer.
A stop watch.
A camera.
A printer.


I would also have to make arraignments with my employer because all company communications regarding shift changes and other things are sent out SMS.
I would not be able to access my email accounts away from home because my two factor security requires my phone.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head.
dv
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I could do a lot of stuff the old fashioned way. Hell, I do already. But I wouldn't want to have to.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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There's nothing wrong with phones...it's the crazy obsession and emotional dependency 24/7 that needs to go.
... A printer?
dv
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Betonhaus posted:
... A printer?

To print out MapQuest directions?
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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dv posted:
Betonhaus posted:
... A printer?

To print out MapQuest directions?

Tht and stuff like boarding passes.
Malkin kick 'em in the face; taste the body
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I work with a lot of luddite professors like this. I think the attitude does little to prepare young people for the future. It also fails to recognize all the benefits of technology.

I have a guest speaker who I have come to my class each year. She's fabulous. However, she gets extremely insulted if anyone brings out a phone, laptop, whatever. She'll stop the whole class.

Guess what. A lot of students use technology to take notes or look up references. It's a tremendous support for students with disabilities and cutting it off completely either knocks out the supports from those students or draws unneeded attention to them.

The students who aren't going to pay attention just aren't going to pay attention. It doesn't matter.

Stress from social media, etc is a very real thing. Better to take on the more complicated yet beneficial task of learning to use tools mindfully. Realizing that every time you pick up your device you are making a choice and advertisers and companies are constantly vying for your attention, just as they always have been.

The lack of digital literacy education terrifies me. We are entering a very scary era where people will be more easily controlled than ever. But you're never going to get enough people to drop off completely for any real length of time. Better to learn how to use tools and resources wisely. Figure out how to control them instead of letting them control you.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Malkin posted:
I work with a lot of luddite professors like this. I think the attitude does little to prepare young people for the future. It also fails to recognize all the benefits of technology.

I have a guest speaker who I have come to my class each year. She's fabulous. However, she gets extremely insulted if anyone brings out a phone, laptop, whatever. She'll stop the whole class.

Guess what. A lot of students use technology to take notes or look up references. It's a tremendous support for students with disabilities and cutting it off completely either knocks out the supports from those students or draws unneeded attention to them.

The students who aren't going to pay attention just aren't going to pay attention. It doesn't matter.

Stress from social media, etc is a very real thing. Better to take on the more complicated yet beneficial task of learning to use tools mindfully. Realizing that every time you pick up your device you are making a choice and advertisers and companies are constantly vying for your attention, just as they always have been.

The lack of digital literacy education terrifies me. We are entering a very scary era where people will be more easily controlled than ever. But you're never going to get enough people to drop off completely for any real length of time. Better to learn how to use tools and resources wisely. Figure out how to control them instead of letting them control you.

I have no tolerance for Luddites. I watched as so many of my generation rejected computers the last 30 years, often acting as if they are doing something noble. The truth is they were cutting off their own futures by refusing to get on this new technology. Being generally anti-tech is stupid with a capital S.
Objecting to current tech in the classroom is irresponsible and sounds to me like a narcissistic ego gone out of control.
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University students ditch their smartphones for a week