Mind your language

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Another kind of confusion happens at the beginning of words. People once worked with a protective bit of clothing called a napron. But enough heard it as “an apron” that apron eventually supplanted napron completely. Other words beginning with vowels and preceded by “an” went through the same process: nadder became adder and nauger, auger (a tool for boring holes). In other instances, an n was added, not subtracted, by a mistake in the opposite direction: a newt was once a ewt, and a nickname was once an eke-name. (Eke is an old word for “also”.) Not all such forms survived: while neilond, nangry and nuncle appear in older English texts, they never did replace island, angry and uncle.


Quote:
...Pariah trod a similarly improbable path: the word means “drummer” in Tamil, becoming the name of a downtrodden ethnic group which often performed ceremonial drumming. That “downtrodden” element of the meaning then became the only one in English.


https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2019/02/02/mistakes-are-the-engine-of-languages-evolution
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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well the things about the drummers is that they were told to get the fiddlesticks away with their noise, so they became pariahs

;)

today I found these

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Image
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oh, and one more thing

momentarily means 'for a moment', not 'in a moment', damn it.

Having said all that, language evolves.
user Stupid cockwomble
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nip it in the butt?

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dv
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Given the historically high rates of literacy, the pace of those changes should slow?

Hahahaha, never mind
iDaemon infinitely loopy
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I’d like to consult with Mickey Hart.
Donkey Butter jerk face
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still way too many people think to peruse something, means to give it a cursory glance instead of read it through thoroughly.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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^^ Same with scan, which means the exact opposite of skim.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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that's a great pic of Barney
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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ukimalefu posted:
well the things about the drummers is that they were told to get the fiddlesticks away with their noise, so they became pariahs

;)

today I found these

Image
Image
Image
Image

oh, and one more thing

momentarily means 'for a moment', not 'in a moment', damn it.

Having said all that, language evolves.


CHAMPING at the bit
Well now we know what's what.
Donkey Butter posted:
still way too many people think to peruse something, means to give it a cursory glance instead of read it through thoroughly.

Because it does. Language rules are descriptive, not prescriptive. Which is why, sadly, it now means both, though I would argue the pendulum of common usage has swung so far that the original definition may eventually become archaic.

The same can be said about a few things in that chart. And a few others are, I think, more often mispronunciations, what linguistics would label as mistakes (misspeaking without a lack of knowledge of correct usage) vs errors (actual gaps in knowledge of the language).
ukimalefu Rebel? resistance? why not both?
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nu lng, who dis?
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently

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Quote:
We don’t have a Yankee accent, but we also don’t really speak with a southern drawl. Ours is an accent that is entirely unique and though it’s often the subject of scorn and ridicule, the Appalachian dialect is an ancient connection to our rich heritage and deserves to be safeguarded and honored.

But why is it that we speak so uniquely?

The predominate theory is that the existence of Appalachian-English is the result of the isolation the mountains beyond the Blue Ridge ensured — making our dialect one of the most ancient and protected dialects in the nation.

While our high-browed relatives who moved to the big city and lost their accent may frown upon our words and pronunciations, it is believed that the Appalachian dialect is a remnant of Elizabethan English.

An evidence of this is the use of words such as “afeared”, a Shakespearean word that is largely forgotten by most English speakers outside of the Appalachian region.
http://appalachianmagazine.com/2017/11/ ... fferently/

maurvir Meat popsicle
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So, they are feral brits?
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Well, feral anyway ...
Quebec french has its share of archaic words and expressions left over from the first colonisers plus its own variants and original words. It got cut off from the mother country quite abruptly and went its own linguistic way.

My father speaks an archaic Dutch dialect that immediately identifies him as a country hick to other Dutch speakers. He was cut off from his mother country in his early teens when his family emigrated after the war.
juice Inadvertently correct
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It would be amusing to watch him interact with Alien.
juice posted:
It would be amusing to watch him interact with Alien.


My dad's regular Dutch was that of a young teen of the 1940s but did improve dramatically after decades of non use through contact with family in The Netherlands and the former Dutch colonies. I was taught it at a young age but have long since lost all of it.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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MacAddict4Life posted:
Donkey Butter posted:
still way too many people think to peruse something, means to give it a cursory glance instead of read it through thoroughly.

Because it does. Language rules are descriptive, not prescriptive. Which is why, sadly, it now means both, though I would argue the pendulum of common usage has swung so far that the original definition may eventually become archaic.

The same can be said about a few things in that chart. And a few others are, I think, more often mispronunciations, what linguistics would label as mistakes (misspeaking without a lack of knowledge of correct usage) vs errors (actual gaps in knowledge of the language).

An example of that is the word "factoid". This originated on a TV show back in the early 80's where they debunked widely held misconceptions. Their definition of factoid was something that sounds like a fact and is used as a fact but is, in fact, not a fact.
Now factoid has morphed into a synonym for trivia. The exact opposite of its original meaning.
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Mind your language