A thought experiment about a turbo hybrid car with a manual.

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My hypothesis is that it would be bonkers to drive. The Electric motor and the gas motor would be permanently linked together on a shared driveshaft so they both always run at the same speed. The motor would do double duty as a starter motor and a generator.

My premise is that it would have a perfectly flat horsepower curve from start to maximum RPM, as the electric motor would provide torque until the turbo gets up to speed and takes over, after which the motor slowly regenerates a little bit of electricity. The engine would automatically stop when idle, as the motor can bring the car from a standstill to full speed with the clutch engaged the entire time.

Does it sound like something that can be made into a car that's fun to drive?
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dv
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Flat torque curve, not flat horsepower curve.

Honda makes one.

https://www.thecarconnection.com/overvi ... a_nsx_2018
dv posted:
Flat torque curve, not flat horsepower curve.

Honda makes one.

https://www.thecarconnection.com/overvi ... a_nsx_2018

Torque cuurve yeah.

Sadly the NSX is an automatic, or at least a "computer controlled manual."

Not the same as letting you make the gear changes yourself, which is the entire point of my theory.

But the NSX is a supercar and so meets the definition of "bonkers to drive"
dv
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Betonhaus posted:
dv posted:
Flat torque curve, not flat horsepower curve.

Honda makes one.

https://www.thecarconnection.com/overvi ... a_nsx_2018

Torque cuurve yeah.

Sadly the NSX is an automatic, or at least a "computer controlled manual."

Not the same as letting you make the gear changes yourself, which is the entire point of my theory.

But the NSX is a supercar and so meets the definition of "bonkers to drive"


Not a lot of cars left with vanilla transmissions and three pedals, regardless of market, but especially at the high end.

Hell, even the Dodge Demon is automatic, probably because they would be replacing too many transmissions otherwise.

Manumatics are where it's at, I guess.
TOS
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i believe a lot of the high-end supercars use electric motors to beat the torque curve

although they too are abandoning manual transmissions

honestly it doesn't make sense to use a stickshift when you've got electric power in the mix ... i know a couple of guys who converted classic cars to run on batteries, and after fantasies of snap-shifting burnouts they ended up just leaving it in one gear all the time
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A thought experiment about a turbo hybrid car with a manual.