Latest fashion trend: "off-the-grid" water

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Source.

That's right: bottled "raw" water from untreated sources.

One of the advocates actually argues that water that was treated using reverse osmosis has become "dead" water because you will "never see it turn green".

Similar to the anti-vax movement, there are advocates for off-the-grid water from the extreme right and left ends of the political spectrum.
juice Inadvertently correct
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You know: morons.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Nice! How do I get in on this moneymaker?!
user Stupid cockwomble
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got a PR garden hose?
arkayn Aaarrrggghhhh
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user posted:
got a PR garden hose?


Better yet, a Flint garden hose.
maurvir Perfectly balanced - mostly
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Pretty sure it has to be free range water to count.
dv
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maurvir posted:
Pretty sure it has to be free range water to count.


Think they can tell?
Old Yoda agitator
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All my water comes from a hand dug well.
ukimalefu Wasn't me
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aren't they calling it "organic" water? because it's not

but I've seen "gluten free" water, believe it or not.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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I've got an untreated water source for them. Well, technically, it's been treated.
Robert B. posted:
Nice! How do I get in on this moneymaker?!

You could be like Penn & Teller. For part of one episode of their "blatherskite" program they set up a "boutique water shop" which had some real products on display like Fiji Water, but their hired actor/salesman really pushed that shop's specialty--and super-expensive though not quite ready for sale--store brand which the store was promoting by giving away free samples to the patrons of the store. It was generally reviewed as being "superior" and with other flattering adjectives.

Of course those bottles were being filled from a garden hose connected to a municipal water line in the back of the shop.
user Stupid cockwomble
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Old Yoda posted:
All my water comes from a hand dug well.

so does mine
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I finally got on "city" water a few years ago.
Hallelujah and Amen!
I got so tired of digging up the foot valve and replacing it almost every year, and dealing with not having water when the electricity was off, adn buying salt for the softener, and buying drinking water, and iron-out to wash clothes in, ...
it was bad.
user Stupid cockwomble
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Grandma passed on the county water when they ran the line - they offered a discount then.
Now I'll have to pay 3 grand just to connect to the sewer, probably at least double that to hook up to the water and get my plumbing up to code. And it's city water now.

I was seriously looking into putting in a composting toilet.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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DEyncourt posted:
One of the advocates actually argues that water that was treated using reverse osmosis has become "dead" water because you will "never see it turn green".


Naturally, they have the double blind, peer reviewed science experiments to back up this claim. Tell you what, I'll just hold my breath here until they produce them.

Last edited by Pithecanthropus on Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:33 pm.

Science-Based Medicine's David Gorski on the fad:
Quote:
I don’t know about you, but there’s nothing like a link to Pinterest showing all sorts of microbiome memes maintained by the company to persuade me. As for the report, I was struck at one result not reported that is generally considered critical to determining if water is pure: The level of coliform bacteria (E. coli, and other bacteria commonly found in feces, certain strains of which can cause disease.) As for the rest, Live Water reports levels of bacteria ranging from 1,310 CFU/mL for Pseudomonas putida to 11,640 CFU/mL for Pseudomonas oleovorans. (CFU=colony forming unit, which is a measure of the number of viable bacteria per volume of water.) This struck me as rather high, and indeed the maximal bacterial level for potable drinking water as regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Safety Act is 50,000 CFU/100 mL or 500 CFU/mL. Granted, these bacteria are generally nonpathogenic, but one has to wonder how careful Live Water is with regards to preventing fecal coliforms to creep in during the bottling process.

[links not added, bold added]

This is from one company's own report, and they cite the above numbers as a GOOD thing because of supposed "probiotic" advantages.

Little wonder why another company's recommendation is that their "raw" water must be consumed within "one lunar cycle" (because that's easier to understand than "within 4 weeks"?): turning green, indeed.
They know what they're doing when the buy raw water....
kamizuno Lasercat targeting.....
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They should add the activia bacteria to it, then it would be probiotic water ;)
kamizuno Lasercat targeting.....
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Ha, I just invented a product:nod:
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Latest fashion trend: "off-the-grid" water