amazing science/nature images

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Post by maurvir »

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GOLD
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How do you spell "fiddlesticks off" in hieroglyphs?
Aw, he's no fun, he fell right over.

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...so I'm supposed to find the Shadow King from inside a daiquiri?
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Post by dv »

user wrote: How do you spell "fiddlesticks off" in hieroglyphs?

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Image
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Aw, he's no fun, he fell right over.

Science is Truth for Life. In FORTRAN tongue the Answer.

...so I'm supposed to find the Shadow King from inside a daiquiri?
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Post by Mustapha Mond »

dv wrote:
user wrote: How do you spell "fiddlesticks off" in hieroglyphs?

Image


:lol:
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Post by ukimalefu »

Image

Image

Image

Image
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Post by maurvir »

Image

Hopefully the real ones are soldered by someone other than Stevie Wonder, but still, this is a cool device.
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Post by ukimalefu »

I barely... (bearly :trollface: ) believe this is real, but I really want to believe it is

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Post by DEyncourt »

How some birds of paradise feathers have nano-structures on their feathers to absorb light:

Image


The pic shows nominally black feathers--the left from a lesser melampitta (a songbird also from New Guinea), the right from a paradise riflebird (one species of the birds of paradise)--which have been sprinkled with fine particles of gold dust. Those nano-structures are such that much of the gold dust gets "lost" on the feather on the right because of the feather's light absorption.

That absorption can be up to 99.95% of visible light, nearly matching humanity's best of 99.965%, BUT the latter was created under high temperatures that caused carbon nanotubes to form. As the author points out: likely there are other ways to mimic nature without requiring such extreme conditions.
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Post by DEyncourt »

There aren't any pictures to illustrate this story but I think it deserves to go here anyway.

After being trained to pick up litter in their pool, one dolphin did some things different.

Kelly the dolphin figured out that the size of the piece of paper she turned in did not make any difference in her reward, so she would take a larger piece of paper and stash it under a rock, then tear off a small piece to get a food reward.

When she got a much larger reward for turning in a dead gull, Kelly began to save the last of her fish from meals under that rock and--specifically when the human trainers were not there to observe--used it to lure another gull into the dolphin pool. Kelly taught this strategy to her calf, who in turn taught it to other calves such that "gull-baiting" became a popular game among the dolphins at this research institute.
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Post by ukimalefu »

Next thing you know, The Simpsons did predict everything

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Post by DukeofNuke »

intellectual/hipster/nihilist

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Post by Séamas »

^^ I heard about that on a Public Radio program.


hey, it was the '60s.
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Post by maurvir »

I've read that story before, but I think the most tragic aspect of it was that the dolphin really did seem to love Lovatt, and she loved the dolphin. Strange, perhaps, but I always got the impression that it was more than a pet/owner thing for both.
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Post by ukimalefu »

Image

Image ;)
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Post by ukimalefu »

Image

Juno's images are in a certain way... disturbing. So much detail, and so much color you never knew was in Jupiter. I mean, it looks unreal, but they're the most accurate pics of Jupiter ever seen.
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Post by juice »

Seeing that picture makes me sad I didn’t have an aptitude for math.
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Post by TOS »

the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see
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Post by DEyncourt »

TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.
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Post by DEyncourt »

What scientists want: Robert Boyle’s to-do list:

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Image


Boyle was the founder of the Royal Society of England in 1663.

A transcript (I've added a √ to indicate at least a partial success with some following notes):
√ The Prolongation of Life.
√ The Recovery of Youth, or at least some of the Marks of it, as new Teeth, new Hair colour’d as in youth.
√ The Art of Flying.
√ The Art of Continuing long under water, and exercising functions freely there.
The Cure of Wounds at a Distance.
The Cure of Diseases at a distance or at least by Transplantation. [unclear to me what is meant by "at a distance"]
The Attaining Gigantick Dimensions. [? I suspect some meaning for "dimensions" has fallen out of use]
The Emulating of Fish without Engines by Custome and Education only.
The Acceleration of the Production of things out of Seed.
√ The Transmutation of Metalls. [not in a literal sense within alchemy, but terms of general alterations]
√ The makeing of Glass Malleable. [do plastics count?]
√ The Transmutation of Species in Mineralls, Animals, and Vegetables. [again, not in a literal sense within alchemy]
√ The Liquid Alkaest and Other dissolving Menstruums.
√ The making of Parabolicall and Hyperbolicall Glasses.
√ The making Armor light and extremely hard.
√ The practicable and certain way of finding Longitudes.
√ The use of Pendulums at Sea and in Journeys, and the Application of it to watches. [not so much about pendulums]
√ Potent Druggs to alter or Exalt Imagination, Waking, Memory, and other functions, and appease pain, procure innocent sleep, harmless dreams, etc.
√ A Ship to saile with All Winds, and A Ship not to be Sunk.
Freedom from Necessity of much Sleeping exemplify’d by the Operations of Tea and what happens in Mad-Men.
Pleasing Dreams and physicall Exercises exemplify’d by the Egyptian Electuary and by the Fungus mentioned by the French Author.
Great Strength and Agility of Body exemplify’d by that of Frantick Epileptick and Hystericall persons.
√ A perpetuall Light.
Varnishes perfumable by Rubbing. [?]
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Post by dv »

You didn't check "The Acceleration of the Production of things out of Seed."?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Revolution
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Post by DEyncourt »

dv wrote: You didn't check "The Acceleration of the Production of things out of Seed."?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Revolution

I didn't because I do not fully understand what Boyle meant by that statement, so I should have added a "[?]".

But, yeah, likely Boyle would have agreed with you.
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Post by Metacell »

I love that octopus, and that's just one of its crazy shapechanges.
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Post by macnuke »

this is not the manatee i was looking for

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Post by TOS »

DEyncourt wrote:
TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.


no offense but that was an extremely unnecessary post
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Post by TOS »

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Post by juice »

TOS wrote:
DEyncourt wrote:
TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.


no offense but that was an extremely unnecessary post

I disagree.
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Post by TOS »

juice wrote:
TOS wrote:
DEyncourt wrote:
TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.


no offense but that was an extremely unnecessary post

I disagree.


cool
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Post by juice »

TOS wrote:
juice wrote:
TOS wrote:
DEyncourt wrote:
TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.


no offense but that was an extremely unnecessary post

I disagree.


cool

It was a well written summary for those of us who don't follow and or recall the program as closely as you do.
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Post by ukimalefu »

juice wrote:
TOS wrote:
juice wrote:
TOS wrote:
DEyncourt wrote:
TOS wrote: the juno photos are incredible ... i had no idea there was still so much to see

You have to recall that previous missions past or to Jupiter had considerable limits to their camera recording systems.

Pioneers 10 and 11 were launched in 1972 and 1973, and they got as close as 132,000 km and 43,000 km in their flybys of Jupiter, respectively. Both spacecraft did not have cameras per se but a photo-sensitive cell which captured light as the craft spun. All pictures from the Pioneers of Jupiter (and of Saturn for Pioneer 11) were considerably massaged to be at all recognizable.

The Voyagers were launched in 1977 so their cameras were based on 1972 technology at latest. Of course they also had the problem of being aboard spacecraft which were passing through the Jovian system so the Voyagers were moving relative to Jupiter and its moons at speeds between 12 and 28 km/sec. Voyager 1's closest point to Jupiter was about 350,000 km while Voyager 2 was about 570,000 km at closest.

Galileo was launched in 1989 so its camera systems dated to around 1984 at latest (using a 5-year development rule-of-thumb for spacecraft). During its mission while Galileo did take pictures of Jupiter itself, its main targets were the Jovian moons thus Galileo spent nearly all of its time around Jupiter beyond 400,000 km from the planet's center. Practically none of Galileo's pictures of Jupiter were from close range except during its de-orbit phase.

On the other hand, Juno (launched in 2011) is spending its time in a highly eccentric orbit around Jupiter. At the closest Juno will get 4,200 km over the clouds of Jupiter (or about 76,000 km from Jupiter's center) while its apojove is about 4.2 million km. Do note that the camera providing these pictures were a public relations move by NASA as they are not being used towards gathering data for Juno's primary mission of attempting to discover the interior structure of Jupiter, but in the critical calculation for equipment aboard a spacecraft SOMETHING must have been sacrificed for that camera (if only additional fuel for manuevers).

For completeness there were also passes by Cassini (on its way to orbit Saturn) and New Horizons (for the gravity assist towards Pluto), but like the Voyagers those craft were only passing through the Jovian system and were millions of km from Jupiter at their closest approaches.


no offense but that was an extremely unnecessary post

I disagree.


cool

It was a well written summary for those of us who don't follow and or recall the program as closely as you do.


I didn't need the post, but I liked it
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Post by ukimalefu »

Image


nature did that
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Post by TOS »

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Post by Pariah »

ukimalefu wrote: Image


nature did that

Parts of brick walls worn like that are actually not super rare to find along the Wisconsin Lake Michigan shore. I bet I have seen at least ten like that.
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Post by ukimalefu »

Pariah wrote:
ukimalefu wrote: Image


nature did that

Parts of brick walls worn like that are actually not super rare to find along the Wisconsin Lake Michigan shore. I bet I have seen at least ten like that.


what I can remember seeing the most is pieces of glass shaped by water like that
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