amazing science/nature images

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macnuke Afar
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it was where all the chamber pots were emptied.
providing natural gas for the lighting.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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user Stupid cockwomble
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The Blue Planet II's submersible was nudged by sharks eating a whale carcass at 750 meters down.

After a bit the sharks figured out that the submersible wasn't competition and returned to chowing down.
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On Feb. 12, 1984, astronaut Bruce McCandless, ventured further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This space first was made possible by a nitrogen jet propelled backpack, previously known at NASA as the Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU. After a series of test maneuvers inside and above Challenger's payload bay, McCandless went "free-flying" to a distance of 320 feet away from the Orbiter. This stunning orbital panorama view shows McCandless out there amongst the black and blue of Earth and space.


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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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juice Inadvertently correct
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He's got a tinder account.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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juice posted:
He's got a tinder account.


Yeah, and apparently he's not even the heaviest user...
Long-lasting supernova hasn't behaved like others:

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It was first spotted in September 2014 by an overall sky surveying telescope which was designed to detect changes in brightness, but as you can see compared to the skyblue line at the bottom this supernova isn't normal.
Quote:
In describing the fates of stars, we'll typically say that big stars explode and leave behind a neutron star, while really big stars explode and leave behind a black hole. That, as it turns out, is a simplification. Really, really big stars—objects with more than 130 times the mass of the Sun—explode in a way that leaves nothing behind. That's because the reactions in their core eventually produce so many high-energy photons that some of them will spontaneously convert to matter. Removing that energy takes away some of the pressure that keeps the star's core from collapsing in on itself. The change is so sudden that it produces a massive fusion explosion, blowing the star to pieces.

Black-hole-forming explosions top out at about 100 solar masses; complete-destruction supernovae start at about 130 solar masses. What happens in between? The same spontaneous conversion to matter occurs in the core of the stars, but it's at somewhat lower levels, so the core collapses more slowly. This allows time for a specific fusion reaction (oxygen-oxygen fusion) to occur, creating a sudden outward pulse of energy. This pulse ejects huge amounts of material—about 10 solar masses—but it leaves the core of the star intact. The process can repeat until the star sheds enough mass to undergo a black-hole-forming supernova.

BUT the above is only a supposition given that stars in this range of mass are extremely rare, on top of the problem of us being able to detect such weird light changes.
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cough*dyson sphere *cough
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DEyncourt posted:
Long-lasting supernova hasn't behaved like others:

Image


It was first spotted in September 2014 by an overall sky surveying telescope which was designed to detect changes in brightness, but as you can see compared to the skyblue line at the bottom this supernova isn't normal.
Quote:
In describing the fates of stars, we'll typically say that big stars explode and leave behind a neutron star, while really big stars explode and leave behind a black hole. That, as it turns out, is a simplification. Really, really big stars—objects with more than 130 times the mass of the Sun—explode in a way that leaves nothing behind. That's because the reactions in their core eventually produce so many high-energy photons that some of them will spontaneously convert to matter. Removing that energy takes away some of the pressure that keeps the star's core from collapsing in on itself. The change is so sudden that it produces a massive fusion explosion, blowing the star to pieces.

Black-hole-forming explosions top out at about 100 solar masses; complete-destruction supernovae start at about 130 solar masses. What happens in between? The same spontaneous conversion to matter occurs in the core of the stars, but it's at somewhat lower levels, so the core collapses more slowly. This allows time for a specific fusion reaction (oxygen-oxygen fusion) to occur, creating a sudden outward pulse of energy. This pulse ejects huge amounts of material—about 10 solar masses—but it leaves the core of the star intact. The process can repeat until the star sheds enough mass to undergo a black-hole-forming supernova.

BUT the above is only a supposition given that stars in this range of mass are extremely rare, on top of the problem of us being able to detect such weird light changes.
That sounds pretty damned amazing.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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unbelievable they got the shock wave :eek:
ukimalefu posted:
unbelievable they got the shock wave :eek:

I know I'm being pedantic, but it's not a shock wave 'cause it's space so a vacuum and thus nothing to transfer that "shock".

What was happening there is a demonstration that while very fast light takes SOME time to travel. The ring being lit up is merely the "edge" of the supernova's light bubble because while EVERYTHING in that region of that galaxy was brightened, much of that being lit up would be barely discernable. We see only that ring "edge" because essentially we are looking through literal light years of only NEAR-vacuum being nearly simultaneously brightened. A similar phenomenon can be seen when older stars around the mass of our Sun start to "puff" out layers of material which MOSTLY look like rings to us only because most of the SPHERE being puffed out is relatively too thin like this one:

Image

(a link in case you want to learn more about Abell 39).


On the other hand, other rings such as the iconic Ring Nebula have their shape because the more massive star which created it made complex structures but in that case we happen to be practically end-on to that structure compared to seeing such from the side as with the Ant Nebula:

Image


That being said: it is rather unlikely that this supernova would NOT have SOME clouds of interstellar dust around it which should have complicated that light echo. Perhaps this is an indication that this particular supernova was on the near-edge of that galaxy?
The Bad Astronomer has more about that long-lasting supernova including how in 1954 it (or another star close by, but then we are talking about stars in a galaxy which is about 500 M light years away) had ANOTHER explosive event though not as huge as even a standard supernova:
Quote:
But inevitably, in the end the star blows up. And this does sound a lot like iPTF14hls: Huge blasts of energy that look like a supernova, but aren’t quite. Then the star really does blow, and that energy sweeps through the older material surrounding the star, causing the emitted light to behave oddly, peaking and dropping and peaking again.

In a sense, though, this is handwaving; while it fits the observations, you need to look at the physics in detail to make sure this can actually happen. And at the moment, the physics doesn’t quite work. For example, the models show that most of the hydrogen in the outer layers gets blown off in the first pulse, but the star that blew up to form iPTF14hls seems to have retained a few dozen times the Sun’s mass worth of hydrogen in its outer layers after the 1954 event. It’s not clear how that could happen.

And while that event was incredibly powerful, it wasn’t really a supernova, but something that fell just short of one. It seems to die but it keeps coming back. iPTF14hls is the Rory Williams of supernovae.

[link omitted and bold added]

Nearly perfect corpse of cave lion cub found in Siberian cave after water levels of nearby river dropped:

Image


There is also a YouTube video of the reveal at the link.

Current estimates is that it is from 20,000 to 50,000 years old. It is already being speculated as being a source for cloning material.
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every time they find something in siberia they talk about cloning it
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Image

Last edited by ukimalefu on Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:34 pm.

NOT related to uki's pic (since his pic was taken on Nov. 14th while this video was recorded on Nov. 16th): Video captures super-bright fireball.

The videographer had set up his camera with the intention of taking videos of aurora.
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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This schlieren image dramatically displays the shock wave of a supersonic jet flying over the Mojave Desert. Researchers used NASA-developed image processing software to remove the desert background, then combined and averaged multiple frames to produce a clear picture of the shock waves.
NASA researchers are using a modern version of a 150-year-old German photography technique to capture images of shock waves created by supersonic airplanes. Schlieren imaging reveals shock waves due to air density gradient and the accompanying change in refractive index.

ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Shouldn't Budwesier figure out how to make beer here on Earth before it tries doing it in space?
macnuke Afar
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if you read that patch fast enough.....


Global Barely Research
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Sorry, no pics to go with this story.

NASA ordered Voyager 1 to fire its backup thrusters for the first time in 37 years.

The amount of thrust from its attitude control thrusters which normally keeps the spacecraft oriented properly has been deteriorating so NASA tried this test as a backup measure. The backup thrusters had been last used when Voyager 1 left Saturn (Voyager 2 was the craft that went by Uranus and Neptune too).

With the successful test they may be able to maintain orientation for a few more years, and NASA plans on trying this with Voyager 2 which hasn't had as much of a problem with its attitude control thrusters.

Aw, heck. Here's a pic taken by Voyager 1:

Image

This perspective was possible only because Voyager 1's path around Saturn was oriented closer to the planet's pole, sending the craft in a direction off the general plane of the planets.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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maurvir posted:
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Such amazing animals

I wonder if they do that to scratch their backs?
juice Inadvertently correct
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They could be doing it for fun or because it looks cool.
macnuke Afar
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they do it to fiddlesticks with humans
Fluidized bed with sand using air.

Just in case that description isn't enough for you, here's a sample from that video:

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user Stupid cockwomble
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Hey, bubbles, man! Say man, when I was growing up, if we wanted a jacuzzi, we had to fart in the tub.


Saw it on broadcast TV once and they'd changed it to "fight".
TOS
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i hate sand ... it gets everywhere
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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amazing science/nature images

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