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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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G292.0+1.8, a supernova remnant, which may have a pulsar at its centre

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the arecibo observatory has been knocked out of action after a cable snapped, causing severe damage to the dish

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weird white patches on asteroid ceres might have been solved

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NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.

Scientists had figured out that the bright areas were deposits made mostly of sodium carbonate - a compound of sodium, carbon, and oxygen. They likely came from liquid that percolated up to the surface and evaporated, leaving behind a highly reflective salt crust. But what they hadn't yet determined was where that liquid came from.

By analyzing data collected near the end of the mission, Dawn scientists have concluded that the liquid came from a deep reservoir of brine, or salt-enriched water. By studying Ceres' gravity, scientists learned more about the dwarf planet's internal structure and were able to determine that the brine reservoir is about 25 miles (40 kilometers) deep and hundreds of miles wide.


source: https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Brig ... w_999.html
jkahless Custom Title
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If they turn blue, I say we throw it into the sun.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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TOS posted:
the arecibo observatory has been knocked out of action after a cable snapped, causing severe damage to the dish

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:(

I bet they won't fix it for years, unless they find private funding.

And, you can see through it? I didn't know that.
juice Inadvertently correct
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I guess that’s the end of Seti@Home
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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juice posted:
I guess that’s the end of Seti@Home


That's been over for a while, they stopped sending tasks to users, but said they would continue to process what they had

https://setiathome.berkeley.edu/

And they not only got data from Arecibo, but also, the Green Bank Telescope.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SETI@home

The Allen telescope array helps with SETI, if not SETI at home

https://www.seti.org/ata

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TOS posted:
weird white patches on asteroid ceres might have been solved

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NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.

Scientists had figured out that the bright areas were deposits made mostly of sodium carbonate - a compound of sodium, carbon, and oxygen. They likely came from liquid that percolated up to the surface and evaporated, leaving behind a highly reflective salt crust. But what they hadn't yet determined was where that liquid came from.

By analyzing data collected near the end of the mission, Dawn scientists have concluded that the liquid came from a deep reservoir of brine, or salt-enriched water. By studying Ceres' gravity, scientists learned more about the dwarf planet's internal structure and were able to determine that the brine reservoir is about 25 miles (40 kilometers) deep and hundreds of miles wide.


source: https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Brig ... w_999.html
It makes me imagine a future of intentionally navigating these watery bodies to planets we want to have water.
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Valley of the Souls located in Bolivia
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obvs posted:
TOS posted:
weird white patches on asteroid ceres might have been solved

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NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.

Scientists had figured out that the bright areas were deposits made mostly of sodium carbonate - a compound of sodium, carbon, and oxygen. They likely came from liquid that percolated up to the surface and evaporated, leaving behind a highly reflective salt crust. But what they hadn't yet determined was where that liquid came from.

By analyzing data collected near the end of the mission, Dawn scientists have concluded that the liquid came from a deep reservoir of brine, or salt-enriched water. By studying Ceres' gravity, scientists learned more about the dwarf planet's internal structure and were able to determine that the brine reservoir is about 25 miles (40 kilometers) deep and hundreds of miles wide.


source: https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Brig ... w_999.html
It makes me imagine a future of intentionally navigating these watery bodies to planets we want to have water.


it is theorized that earth got its water that way (well, by comet collisions, not intentional aiming)
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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TOS posted:
(well, by comet collisions, not intentional aiming)


or... did it?

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TOS posted:
obvs posted:
TOS posted:
weird white patches on asteroid ceres might have been solved

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NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.

Scientists had figured out that the bright areas were deposits made mostly of sodium carbonate - a compound of sodium, carbon, and oxygen. They likely came from liquid that percolated up to the surface and evaporated, leaving behind a highly reflective salt crust. But what they hadn't yet determined was where that liquid came from.

By analyzing data collected near the end of the mission, Dawn scientists have concluded that the liquid came from a deep reservoir of brine, or salt-enriched water. By studying Ceres' gravity, scientists learned more about the dwarf planet's internal structure and were able to determine that the brine reservoir is about 25 miles (40 kilometers) deep and hundreds of miles wide.


source: https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Brig ... w_999.html
It makes me imagine a future of intentionally navigating these watery bodies to planets we want to have water.


it is theorized that earth got its water that way (well, by comet collisions, not intentional aiming)
That much I knew, but it seems like the most obvious choice. We know that there's water on large bodies farther out into the solar system, and we know that there are two planets within our general range that could be habitable given the right circumstances. Now I am wondering about the possibility of adding satellites. Would that create a stronger magnetic field around Mars, for example? Or imagine crashing a huge wet ball with a massive amount of water into Venus, which has a much thicker atmosphere compared to ours? Some of these objects are known to have huge amounts of water, even more than Earth. Imagine the effects of adding an Earth amount of water to Venus.

These sound like some really cool possibilities.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Mars' core has apparently cooled to the point where it is either completely solid, or otherwise no longer capable of spinning fast enough to generate a magnetic field. I'm not sure it could be restarted at this point without an event that would potentially destroy the planet - or at the very least, create some new moons.

Even if you could restart it, so much of the atmosphere is gone that, while the ground would certainly be a lot safer from radiation, you would still be unable to breathe and micrometeorites that would burn up on Earth will punch holes in your shelters.

Which means any settlements will necessarily have to move underground almost as soon as they can. I'm not saying it won't happen, but I doubt Mars ever becomes a resort destination. As a stepping off point for further exploration, however, Mars is nearly ideal - far more so than the moon.
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We're talking about crashing huge things into Mars, creating explosions far greater than any so far caused by human activity.

I am not sure the question of how thick the atmosphere would or would not be is settled in that case.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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obvs posted:
We're talking about crashing huge things into Mars, creating explosions far greater than any so far caused by human activity.

I am not sure the question of how thick the atmosphere would or would not be is settled in that case.


You are talking about steering large meteorites into the surface, or the "mass driver" scenario. We almost have the technology to do that now, though it would take a long, long time to actually occur. Also, this activity could very easily fall into the potentially planet damaging category.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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obvs posted:
We're talking about crashing huge things into Mars, creating explosions far greater than any so far caused by human activity.

I am not sure the question of how thick the atmosphere would or would not be is settled in that case.


ok, but having air and water is not enough to live there
macnuke Afar
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ukimalefu posted:
obvs posted:
We're talking about crashing huge things into Mars, creating explosions far greater than any so far caused by human activity.

I am not sure the question of how thick the atmosphere would or would not be is settled in that case.


ok, but having air and water is not enough to live there


pack a sammich, you'll be fine
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macnuke posted:
ukimalefu posted:
obvs posted:
We're talking about crashing huge things into Mars, creating explosions far greater than any so far caused by human activity.

I am not sure the question of how thick the atmosphere would or would not be is settled in that case.


ok, but having air and water is not enough to live there


pack a sammich, you'll be fine


the problem is radiation
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Arecibo:

https://www.theverge.com/2020/8/14/2136 ... ector-dish

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Operators of the observatory say the overall facility is mostly fine, but they’re working to figure out exactly what went wrong.

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“The majority of that primary reflector is in good shape, but our focus is really making sure that the platform has the structural stability needed to operate in the near future,” Francisco Cordova, the director of the observatory at the University of Central Florida, said during a press call.

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the team doesn’t know how long it will take to repair the damage — or how much it’s going to cost.


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MARS SOUTH POLE CAP NASA’s 2001 Mars Odyssey orbiter snapped this image of beautiful textures in the ice of Mars’ South Pole. Stretching horizontally across the bottom of the image is a giant trough where deeper layers of ice can be seen. NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU

ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Red-billed Streamertail or scisor-tailed hummingbird (Trochilus polytmus), endemic to Jamaica, sips sugared water as a substitute for blossom nectar.
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ukimalefu posted:


there's a certain group of believers who are convinced that mars is covered the ancient ruins of a civilization that was wiped out eons ago, and looking at this i admit i'm sympathetic to that view
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TOS posted:
ukimalefu posted:


there's a certain group of believers who are convinced that mars is covered the ancient ruins of a civilization that was wiped out eons ago, and looking at this i admit i'm sympathetic to that view


https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0183523/
juice Inadvertently correct
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TOS posted:
ukimalefu posted:


there's a certain group of believers who are convinced that mars is covered the ancient ruins of a civilization that was wiped out eons ago, and looking at this i admit i'm sympathetic to that view

That reminds me of the people who were convinced they were seeing ancient canals on Mars.
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TOS posted:
ukimalefu posted:


there's a certain group of believers who are convinced that mars is covered the ancient ruins of a civilization that was wiped out eons ago, and looking at this i admit i'm sympathetic to that view
It's not impossible at all. We're not even sure what we'd be looking for. Mars and Venus, although both believed to once be similar to Earth, have both gone through changes that would be unknown for any kind of civilization on Earth.

We can't identify the structures we could expect to find from such a civilization. A year ago we couldn't even tell the whole world would be wearing masks in a year.
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sedimentary layers. probably proves there was once lots of water.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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DukeofNuke posted:
sedimentary layers. probably proves there was once lots of water.


but... I want to believe!!!

and sure, the martians liked to drink some water every now and then, and go for a swim in the summer
DukeofNuke posted:
sedimentary layers. probably proves there was once lots of water.

Exactly, thats sedimentary rocks and wind blown sand from erosion. It proves liquid, almost certainly water and ice, once flowed on Mars. I’ve not yet seen a hint of ancient civilization. If any existed that built structures I’d expect we’d have seen evidence by now in orbiter pictures. Still there remains possibility life exists underground.
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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ukimalefu posted:


those teen years can be so rough ...
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amazing science/nature images

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