amazing science/nature images

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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Good one, uki. I've been trying to get something remotely close to this on my camera with no luck so far.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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4-part VR series from the NY Times. This is some really great footage of what seems almost like an alien world.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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China’s lander releases data, high-resolution images of the Moon


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A little more than one year ago, China's Chang'e 4 spacecraft landed on the far side of the Moon. In doing so, it became the first-ever vehicle to make a soft landing on the side of the Moon facing away from Earth.

To mark the one-year anniversary, China released a batch of scientific data and images captured by five scientific payloads aboard the 1.2-ton spacecraft and its small Yutu 2 rover. Since the landing, the rover has driven a little more than 350 meters across the Moon's surface, studying rock formations and taking additional photos. The data was collected over a period of 12 lunar "days," or most of the last year.


*insert Pink Floyd reference here*
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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juice Inadvertently correct
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That would be a great gif.
dv
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https://twitter.com/RichardAOB/status/1 ... 6027435008

I know it's probably not true, but I want it to be.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Earth swimming in a sea of stars amidst the Milky Way

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NASA's Parker Solar Probe captured this astonishing prospect of Earth swimming in a sea of stars over the course of ten days in April 2019. Earth is the first bright round spot that shows up and moves to the right of the frame before the Milky Way is seen. The Moon was too close to Earth to be resolved. The background star near Earth is Spica. Mercury is seen in transit across the Milky Way core. Venus is the very bright spot at the end. Jupiter and Saturn are also seen. The stripes are cosmic rays hitting the camera sensor. By the time Parker Solar Probe imaged Venus it was traveling at 95km/s (~213,000mph).

ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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This ultraviolet Hubble movie shows the ring aurora on Jupiter and the silhouette and shadow of its moon Europa. You can also see the magnetic footprint of Io, just ahead of the aurora.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Dang...for a minute I thought that was an albino ceolacanth.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Last edited by ukimalefu on Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:07 am.

Astrophotography already complicated by Starlink satellites:

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Mind you: currently there are "only" 60 Starlink satellites. By the end of 2020 SpaceX plans to have almost 200 in orbit while the entire constellation of satellites is supposed to number about 12,000.
"PigeonBot" uses real pigeon feathers and wing joint arrangements to improve flying:

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The pic is an overlay showing three positions for the wings. There is also a YouTube video demonstrating the bot in action.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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When I first saw this I thought "nice drone photo"...

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But the source says:

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Lava and ash billow out of Raung, one of the most active volcanoes on the island of Java in Indonesia. Raung towers more than 10,000 feet above sea level and was captured here during a powerful eruption in 2015 with a short-wave infrared satellite camera. The ash produced during this activity forced the closure of numerous airports on the island.


Satellite!? wow
juice Inadvertently correct
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That makes peeing in the backyard more voyeuristic than I may have thought.
TOS
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DEyncourt posted:
Astrophotography already complicated by Starlink satellites:

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Mind you: currently there are "only" 60 Starlink satellites. By the end of 2020 SpaceX plans to have almost 200 in orbit while the entire constellation of satellites is supposed to number about 12,000.


and in standard stick fiddling silicon valley arrogant asshollery, it never occurred to any of those shitbirds to consult with anyone or give a human waste how it would affect anyone else
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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I think it was fairly inevitable that space would become commercialized, and that astrophotography from the surface would begin to become untenable. This unfortunately means that orbiting or lunar observatories are going to have to be built, putting it out of reach for amateurs. Also, while the satellites themselves can be darkened, the solar panels can't, so they will continue to show up in pictures.

A perhaps worse issue is that this is going to dramatically increase the amount of crap in orbit, making launches more difficult. I wonder if SpaceX has considered that other space-faring countries might not appreciate having to check with them every time they want to launch something into orbit to avoid their rocket getting slammed by one of these?
My understanding is that SpaceX's Starlink will be "parking" its satellite constellation in orbits which are 500+ miles in altitude, so even after the full constellation of 12,000 satellites are up they won't be in the "usual" low-earth orbit of about 250 miles up.
dv
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DEyncourt posted:
My understanding is that SpaceX's Starlink will be "parking" its satellite constellation in orbits which are 500+ miles in altitude, so even after the full constellation of 12,000 satellites are up they won't be in the "usual" low-earth orbit of about 250 miles up.


In order for something to be "parked" relative to the ground it would have to be in geostationary orbit. That's a lot more than 500 miles up.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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22,300 miles

invented by Arthur C Clark
dv posted:
DEyncourt posted:
My understanding is that SpaceX's Starlink will be "parking" its satellite constellation in orbits which are 500+ miles in altitude, so even after the full constellation of 12,000 satellites are up they won't be in the "usual" low-earth orbit of about 250 miles up.


In order for something to be "parked" relative to the ground it would have to be in geostationary orbit. That's a lot more than 500 miles up.

Ah, sorry. By "parking" I meant that to mean while the launches of all THE FIRST SET of Starlink satellites will begin at about 250 miles or 400 km in altitude, they will gradually elongate their orbits until they get to about 550 miles kilometers--grumph: I see I had mixed up kilometers for miles--or 340 miles up where they will remain (and thus "parked" but only in term of altitude).

Of course this is not geosynchronous, but given the potentially shorter distance from the ground to the nearest Starlink satellite, the completed constellation will be set up to direct traffic to the satellite closest to the location of the recipient, thus the longest possible path using Starlink may be about 21000 km or about 70 milliseconds, a considerable improvement over the 280+ ms that any round-trip connection through any geosynchronous satellite at 42,000 km altitude requires. These lag numbers do not add the in-server turnaround time which will more badly affect that Starlink lag.

ON THE OTHER HAND: I see that the fuller plans for Starlink include a set of satellites which will be placed into VERY low-earth orbit of only 340 km or 210 miles up. I haven't seen any of the reasoning to use this lower orbit, but over HALF of the eventual Starlink constellation--about 7,500 satellites--is planned for this level. My understanding is that such very low-earth orbits are only used for satellites with rather short-term lifespans, so it isn't clear to me what advantage Starlink will get from this set of satellites.

And, of course, this is assuming that I haven't mixed up my kilometers with miles in the above numbers again.
TOS
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other companies besides space-x want to launch these networks (such as amazon)-- there could easily be tens of thousands of these satellites in just a few years
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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These days there are 4.994 satellites in orbit according to:

https://www.geospatialworld.net/blogs/d ... tes-earth/

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I've seen many videos taken with a 360 camera recently, and it removes the selfie stick attached to it. It's truly amazing, and that's from a relatively affordable consumer product. Couldn't there be similar technology that would remove unwanted stuff from astrophotography?
ukimalefu posted:
These days there are 4.994 satellites in orbit according to:

https://www.geospatialworld.net/blogs/d ... tes-earth/

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I've seen many videos taken with a 360 camera recently, and it removes the selfie stick attached to it. It's truly amazing, and that's from a relatively affordable consumer product. Couldn't there be similar technology that would remove unwanted stuff from astrophotography?

Sure...if all you need is pretty pictures.

On the other hand: what many astrophotographers are doing is gathering data. While any satellite tracks can be easily 'Shopped out, there is still that annoying loss of data.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Yup, this is a good example of the spiral as a photon speeds along. One of those sine waves is the electric field oscillation. The other is the magnetic field.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Quote:
The "trains" of Starlink satellites have raised widespread concern in the astronomical community, whose members worry about the effect of potentially thousands of these small spacecraft on their observations. In response, SpaceX has begun experimenting with darkening treatment and will consider other measures. SpaceX founder Elon Musk has said he is sympathetic to the concerns of astronomers and will take steps to ensure the fidelity of astronomical observations.

Quote:
These satellites will be launched to an altitude of 290km and then will raise their orbits to an altitude of 550km over the next one to four weeks, SpaceX said.


Don't know how soon that will happen, or if it will work, but for now, they keep launching them.

(link is about the launch, not about astronomy)

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/01 ... y-morning/
that's pretty neat
macnuke Afar
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The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope has produced the highest resolution image of the sun's surface ever taken. In this picture, taken at 789 nanometers (nm), we can see features as small as 18 miles in size for the first time ever.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/29/world/sun-image-inouye-telescope-scn/index.html

(can we tell trump it's gold and he should go get it?)
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Big trees are big

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The Bad Astronomer wrote this article about the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii in which he added this graphic:

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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TOS
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i'm super confused ... is that the butt? why is it like that?
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amazing science/nature images

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