If you needed just one more reason to not trust Well's Fargo

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"Wells Fargo fined $1 billion for insurance and mortgage abuses".

Notably this was done under the direction of Mick Mulvaney, currently the Acting Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, because as the author wrote:
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As a congressman, [Mulvaney] called for the bureau's destruction. And under his leadership, the bureau has delayed payday-loan rules, dropped lawsuits against payday lenders and stripped a fair-lending division of its enforcement powers.

Pariah Know Your Enemy
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So, they got fined aprox .02% of their total assets?

No jail, no justice.
juice Inadvertently correct
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user posted:
WF has been running ads trying to say that's all behind them now and we can trust them.

Do note that user posted the above on Nov 25, 2016.

"Wells Fargo says its promises to restore consumer trust were just ‘puffery.’ But they look more like lies"

Did you know that there is a legal term called "puffery"? Basically it covers things like advertisement and slogans such as "Disneyland: the Happiest Place On Earth":
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Simply put, judges and regulators have ruled that when a business makes a claim that is either vague or so obviously inflated that people simply won’t believe it, that’s “puffery,” and not actionable in court.

Wells Fargo (WF) is being sued by some shareholders for--among other things--having then-new CEO Tim Sloan to make a public statement to shareholders on November 3, 2016, in which he claimed that he knew of no upcoming problems. This was clearly false because in one particular scandal--the one where WF charged customers taking out car loans an extra fee in every monthly payment to cover car insurance which none of those customers were aware of--the back-history revealed that WF execs should have known about this because a consulting firm looking over WF's business practices gave those execs a summary about that bank loan/car insurance scam in June 2016 (though this particular problem was first publically revealed in July 2017 when the NY Times got a leaked copy of that consulting firm's report).

In the current phase of pre-trial arguments those shareholders want to expand their suit into a class-action suit to cover anyone who had bought shares of WF from November 3, 2016 through August 3, 2018, but the lawyers for WF countered with the puffery argument.
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If it sounds like a strange thing for a bank to say when it’s trying to present itself as a paragon of rectitude — in essence, “We can’t be sued because no one believed us anyway” — just wait. It gets stranger.

Wells Fargo says that even though the statements by its management fall within the legal definition of puffery, that doesn’t mean they’re untrue. “Wells Fargo stands behind the statements it made regarding its commitment to transparency and rebuilding trust with its customers,” the bank told me [the author of the news report at the above link] by email. “These statements were true then and remain so today.”

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If you needed just one more reason to not trust Well's Fargo

Page: 1, 2, 3