The Random Image Thread (keeping it PG-13 at the worst)

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user Stupid cockwomble
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Donkey Butter posted:
did you actually go out on the ice?

When I went down there, there were a couple other photographers out on the ice and you could here it creaking under their feet.

(I shot from the shore)

At the ice?

Now that's just mean.
sean Royal Wombat
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Nah... don't shoot at the ice... just drop a bowling ball from a helicopter. :evil:
Donkey Butter jerk face
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hahaha I wish I would have thought of it at the time and just chucked a rock on the ice, just to watch them panic.
TOS
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i stole that photo from the star website, but i have gone out on the ice before ... it creaks and pops even when it's thick
TOS
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let's bathe the kitties

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TOS
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obvs Socialist isn't an epithet;it's a badge.
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TOS posted:
let's bathe the kitties

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It's like that scene from Watchmen.
Mustapha Mond Daring to be stupid
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TOS posted:
let's bathe the kitties

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This should be a Japanese game show.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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"Award-winning image shows murmuration of starlings in shape of giant bird":

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But [the photographer] Mr Biber said he only realised his luck once he reviewed the photographs on his computer.

He said: "I was taking pictures of the murmurations over several days.

"Only when I checked the pictures on the computer later, I realised what formation the starlings had created.

"I was so concentrated on taking pictures at the time that I hadn't realised that the starlings had created a giant bird in the sky.

"It took less than 10 seconds for the birds to create that formation.

"I realised that I had captured a unique snapshot, technically, sharp and in high quality."

.....

The images were submitted to an international photography run by the bird observatory Vogelwarte Sempbach in Switzerland.

Organisers received 6,800 images for their 2017 competition which had been submitted by 540 photographers from 15 countries.

Mr Biber, a semi-professional photographer, won the competition and has since had requests from experts who use his images to prove the difference between real and doctored images.

He has also had requests from museums about a potential exhibition next year.

dv
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maurvir posted:
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Why does a law firm need a goat?


Umm... why does it NOT need a goat? That thing is adorable.
jkahless Custom Title
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It's supposed to be a ram, not a goat.
dv
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jkahless posted:
It's supposed to be a ram, not a goat.

Well, then they need a wolf and a deer too...
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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juice Inadvertently correct
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dv posted:
maurvir posted:
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Why does a law firm need a goat?


Umm... why does it NOT need a goat? That thing is adorable.

I wonder if peach works there.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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It's past midnight. Over the whump of the wipers and the screech of the fan belt, we lurch through the side streets of Southeast Portland in a battered white van, double-checking our toolkit: flashlight, binoculars, duct tape, scissors, watch caps, rawhide gloves, vinyl gloves, latex gloves, trash bags, 30-gallon can, tarpaulins, Sharpie, notebook--notebook?

Well, yes. Technically, this is a journalistic exercise--at least, that's what we keep telling ourselves. We're upholding our sacred trust as representatives of the Fourth Estate. Comforting the afflicted, afflicting the comfortable.Pushing the reportorial envelope--by liberating the trash of Portland's top brass.

We didn't dream up this idea on our own. We got our inspiration from the Portland police.

Back in March, the police swiped the trash of fellow officer Gina Hoesly. They didn't ask permission. They didn't ask for a search warrant. They just grabbed it. Their sordid haul, which included a bloody tampon, became the basis for drug charges against her (see "Gross Violation," below).

The news left a lot of Portlanders--including us--scratching our heads. Aren't there rules about this sort of thing? Aren't citizens protected from unreasonable search and seizure by the Fourth Amendment?

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office doesn't think so. Prosecutor Mark McDonnell says that once you set your garbage out on the curb, it becomes public property.

"She placed her garbage can out in the open, open to public view, in the public right of way," McDonnell told Judge Jean Kerr Maurer earlier this month. "There were no signs on the garbage, 'Do not open. Do not trespass.' There was every indication...she had relinquished her privacy, possessory interest."

Police Chief Mark Kroeker echoed this reasoning. "Most judges have the opinion that [once] trash is put out...it's trash, and abandoned in terms of privacy,"he told WW.

In fact, it turns out that police officers throughout Oregon have been rummaging through people's trash for more than three decades. Portland drug cops conduct"garbage pulls" once or twice per month, says narcotics Sgt. Eric Schober.

On Dec. 10, Maurer rubbished this practice. Scrutinizing garbage, she declared, is an invasion of privacy: The police must obtain a search warrant before they swipe someone's trash.

"Personal and business correspondence, photographs, personal financial information, political mail, items related to health concerns and sexual practices are all routinely found in garbage receptacles," Maurer wrote. The fact that a person has put these items out for pick-up, she said, "does not suggest an invitation to others to examine them."

But local law enforcement officials pooh-poohed the judge's decision.

"This particular very unique and very by-herself judge took a position no in concert with the other judges who had given us instruction by their decisions across the years," said Kroeker.

The District Attorney's Office agreed and vowed to challenge the ruling.

The question of whether your trash is private might seem academic. It's not.Your garbage can is like a trap door that opens on to your most intimate secrets; what you toss away is, in many ways, just as revealing as what you keep.

And your garbage can is just one of the many places where your privacy is being pilfered. In the wake of 9/11, the U.S. government has granted itself far-reaching new powers to spy on you, from email to bank statements to video cameras (see"Big Brother's in Your Trash Can," below).

After much debate, we resolved to turn the tables on three of our esteemed public officials. We embarked on an unauthorized sightseeing tour of their garbage, to make a point about how invasive a "garbage pull" really is--and to highlight the government's ongoing erosion of people's privacy.

We chose District Attorney Mike Schrunk because his office is the most vocal defender of the proposition that your garbage is up for grabs. We chose Police Chief Mark Kroeker because he runs the bureau. And we chose Mayor Vera Katz because, as police commissioner, she gives the chief his marching orders.

Each, in his or her own way, has endorsed the notion that you abandon your privacy when you set your trash out on the curb. So we figured they wouldn't mind too much if we took a peek at theirs.

Boy, were we wrong.


Yeah, no kidding. Invasions of privacy are only suitable for the little people. :squint:

Great article, though. Placed here because the article is from 2002, but I love a proper journalistic trolling.

Last edited by maurvir on Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:16 pm.

maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ernst Junger's WW1 memoir 'Storm of Steel':
It’s an easier matter to describe these sounds than to endure them, because one cannot but associate every single sound of flying steel with the idea of death, and so I huddled in my hole in the ground with my hand in front of my face, imagining all the possible variants of being hit. I think I have found a comparison that captures the situation in which I and all the other soldiers who took part in this war so often found ourselves: you must imagine you are securely tied to a post, being menaced by a man swinging a heavy hammer. Now the hammer has been taken back over his head, ready to be swung, now it’s cleaving the air towards you, on the point of touching your skull, then it’s struck the post, and the splinters are flying — that’s what it’s like to experience heavy shelling in an exposed position.

Donkey Butter jerk face
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wasn't there some guy that found a McDonalds monopoly game ticket in someone's trash and he got to keep it winnings because you don't own your trash once you set it out at the curb.

My recollection was that there was a court case and the out come was finders keepers losers weepers.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Donkey Butter posted:
wasn't there some guy that found a McDonalds monopoly game ticket in someone's trash and he got to keep it winnings because you don't own your trash once you set it out at the curb.

My recollection was that there was a court case and the out come was finders keepers losers weepers.


It's actually a pretty established principle that when you place your trash in public you are giving up ownership of, or abandoning, it. This means that, so long as you aren't trespassing to do so, you can sift through anyone's garbage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_v._Greenwood
TOS
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maurvir posted:
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Ernst Junger's WW1 memoir 'Storm of Steel':
It’s an easier matter to describe these sounds than to endure them, because one cannot but associate every single sound of flying steel with the idea of death, and so I huddled in my hole in the ground with my hand in front of my face, imagining all the possible variants of being hit. I think I have found a comparison that captures the situation in which I and all the other soldiers who took part in this war so often found ourselves: you must imagine you are securely tied to a post, being menaced by a man swinging a heavy hammer. Now the hammer has been taken back over his head, ready to be swung, now it’s cleaving the air towards you, on the point of touching your skull, then it’s struck the post, and the splinters are flying — that’s what it’s like to experience heavy shelling in an exposed position.


i remember touring the wwi battlefields a few years ago ... there are still heaps of rusting shell casings here and there
TOS
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TOS
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this show is amusing

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Séamas Honorary Consul General
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TOS posted:
maurvir posted:
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Ernst Junger's WW1 memoir 'Storm of Steel':
It’s an easier matter to describe these sounds than to endure them, because one cannot but associate every single sound of flying steel with the idea of death, and so I huddled in my hole in the ground with my hand in front of my face, imagining all the possible variants of being hit. I think I have found a comparison that captures the situation in which I and all the other soldiers who took part in this war so often found ourselves: you must imagine you are securely tied to a post, being menaced by a man swinging a heavy hammer. Now the hammer has been taken back over his head, ready to be swung, now it’s cleaving the air towards you, on the point of touching your skull, then it’s struck the post, and the splinters are flying — that’s what it’s like to experience heavy shelling in an exposed position.


i remember touring the wwi battlefields a few years ago ... there are still heaps of rusting shell casings here and there


I recall a friend of mine telling me about a trip to Belgium in the '90s--and how there were weird receptacles on the roadside for farmers to deposit old shells that pop up from the World wars.

I don't know if I should be so disheartened or surprised that there has been virtually NOTHING in the USA marking any centennial of WWi. I know the USA entered late, but I expected more reporting, media and documentaries about it over the last couple years.
Séamas posted:
[snip]
I don't know if I should be so disheartened or surprised that there has been virtually NOTHING in the USA marking any centennial of WWi. I know the USA entered late, but I expected more reporting, media and documentaries about it over the last couple years.

There are those physical differences. Aside from rather rare physical remnants within the US, the last would have been any US veterans, the last of whom died in 2011 at 110.

Incidentally he was outlasted by Florence Green of the UK who died at just under 111 years old in 2012.

But, yeah--there should be more on centennial of WWI.
TOS
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it's definitely remembered in a big way up here
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Leonard Nimoy with a Hobbit Hole cake in honor of his song “The Ballad Of Bilbo Baggins” - 1968
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Séamas Honorary Consul General
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DEyncourt posted:
Séamas posted:
[snip]
I don't know if I should be so disheartened or surprised that there has been virtually NOTHING in the USA marking any centennial of WWi. I know the USA entered late, but I expected more reporting, media and documentaries about it over the last couple years.

There are those physical differences. Aside from rather rare physical remnants within the US, the last would have been any US veterans, the last of whom died in 2011 at 110.

Incidentally he was outlasted by Florence Green of the UK who died at just under 111 years old in 2012.

But, yeah--there should be more on centennial of WWI.


I noticed the other day another sign that I am getting old.
I remember as a kid seeing old-guy WWI veterans. Now the Vietnam Veterans are as old as they were.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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(reformatted for easier reading)
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dv
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That's a pretty epic burn.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Dr Nicole Prause set up Liberos to study how sex can improve your health
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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My first computer

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And ours did get that same 16k memory expansion pack. The monitor was a black and white TV and for storage we used a mono cassette tape recorder.

I had a great game (or so I thought at the time) called mazogs.

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The Random Image Thread (keeping it PG-13 at the worst)

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