The Random Image Thread (keeping it PG-13 at the worst)

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Elaborate tattoos found on mummified body of ancient Egyptian via infra-red photography:

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Previously the dark markings were believed to be discoloration by the mummification process. 12 other mummies had tattoos which were limited to relatively simple marks like lines and/or dots.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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maurvir posted:
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Never drive through water that you don't know the exact depth of. Jesus, people are stupid.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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They have some awfully expensive water...
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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"Sentinel-1 Provides New Insight into Italy's Earthquake":

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Note: 30 cm ≈ 12 inches.

MOST seismic data records ONLY horizontal movement.

It is thought that the 1994 Northridge quake had some significant damage somewhat far from the epicenter because the San Fernando Valley ground structure focused some reflected energy some distance away AND more in a vertical motion.
chikie The same deviled egg
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DEyncourt posted:

MOST seismic data records ONLY horizontal movement.

That is false. Unless we're talking about specific cases (i.e. geophones for seismic profiling), most seismometers are 3 - component, meaning they record vertical and horizontal motion.

OTOH, inSAR techniques are far more sensitive to displacements in the vertical direction than the horizontal direction. It requires additional passes from different look angles to properly resolve the horizontal component.

ETA: If we're talking about observing total ground movement instead of seismic waves, GPS geodesy is more accurate in the horizontal direction, but it also records vertical movement. The only thing I can think of that is only restricted to the horizontal direction is triangulation based geodesy, which really isn't used much anymore.
So it looks like a wedge of land dropped and land on either side moved toward the dropping wedge?
chikie The same deviled egg
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As I think about things more, I'm increasingly dubious of those InSAR results showing horizontal motion. The Moment Tensors (a seismic product which shows the direction that the earth moved during the earthquake) for both earthquakes show predominantly dip-slip motion, meaning there should be a minimal horizontal component. The vertical interferogram only shows subsidence, but there should be a uplift signal on the other side of the fault. They probably only have a couple passes with Sentinel - 1, so that probably explains the relative low quality.

TL;DR, ESA wants to show off their new satellite and its applicability towards natural disasters in Europe. The quality of such rapid products can be very suspect.
chikie posted:
DEyncourt posted:

MOST seismic data records ONLY horizontal movement.

That is false. Unless we're talking about specific cases (i.e. geophones for seismic profiling), most seismometers are 3 - component, meaning they record vertical and horizontal motion.

OTOH, inSAR techniques are far more sensitive to displacements in the vertical direction than the horizontal direction. It requires additional passes from different look angles to properly resolve the horizontal component.

ETA: If we're talking about observing total ground movement instead of seismic waves, GPS geodesy is more accurate in the horizontal direction, but it also records vertical movement. The only thing I can think of that is only restricted to the horizontal direction is triangulation based geodesy, which really isn't used much anymore.

Ah, my apologies. Apparently my information is dated, so thanks for the correction.

BUT I was talking about an event from 22 years ago. As I am a local--Northridge is some 30 miles north of me and I was here in 1994--I do recall that there was some puzzlement over the somewhat spotty nature of the damage, and that it was only through some eyewitness reports of movement (as opposed to seismic records) that localized vertical movement from that quake in certain areas was SUSPECTED to be the cause of that weirdness.

Or maybe I was lacking more detailed local news reporting?
chikie The same deviled egg
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22 years ago, GPS geodesy and InSAR were both in their infancy, so that is probably the case.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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maurvir posted:
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They have some awfully expensive water...

Notice the lack of cute drawings on top of the cappuccinos.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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TOS
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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ukimalefu posted:
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That one made me yell, "No! No! NO! NO! NOOO! ... Omagod!"
C. Ives Lacks Critical stick fiddling Thinking
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Proof that every dog has his day.
TOS
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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TOS posted:
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A train station in China?
One thing for sure; those people know how to queue!
macnuke Afar
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just the fact those are humans and probably going thru their daily regime.....
totally hurts my head.
dv
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macnuke posted:
just the fact those are humans and probably going thru their daily regime.....
totally hurts my head.

See, I assumed they were queued up for a parade.
TOS
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my assumption was a chinese train station during the holidays

but then i realized it's way, way too organized for that to be the case

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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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juice Inadvertently correct
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That cutting board needs replaced.
Eh? I've much more heavily used cutting boards. The more cuts in the board, the more care one needs cleaning them though.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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DukeofNuke posted:
TOS posted:
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A train station in China?
One thing for sure; those people know how to queue!

Um, this was in Tokyo, Japan, people queuing for entry into Comiket 81 in 2011. So, no, not a daily--though twice yearly--event.
TOS
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maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Stuff like that is why I wish there was a way to convert GIFs into decent live wallpapers...

Note, I said decent. There are ways to do it, but they drain your battery like crazy.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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In 1976 Jack Kirby almost completed the first issue of "The Prisoner":

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Based on Patrick McGoohan's "The Prisoner" from the 1960's of course. Marvel pulled the plug on the project before the first issue was fully complete: only the last page is not fully inked.
Yeah, nice big hole.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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Kirk posted:
Yeah, nice big hole.


That's what she said?
chikie The same deviled egg
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While its not going to impact operations much, still unfortunate a satellite that new got dinged up like that.
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The Random Image Thread (keeping it PG-13 at the worst)

Page: 1 ... 559, 560, 561, 562, 563, 564, 565 ... 928