What was the last movie you saw?

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The Deal (2003) Michael Sheen's first movie role as Tony Blair. He Played Blair in "The Queen" with Helen Mirren, and then in "The Special Relationship". His trilogy.

This is the story of How Blair worked his way up to the leadership of the Labour Party by ultimately challenging his friend and colleague Gordon Brown, Played by David Morrissey.
Unlike the later "The Special Relationship", this film treats very dry material with more style and artistry and doesn't spray exposition at the audience at every opportunity. I knew next to nothing about the events portrayed in the film but that didn't stop me from grasping what was going on or how important the events portrayed would eventually become.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

Started watching this because my kids have seen and liked the errol Flynn Robin Hood. Also because the whole family likes Alan Rickman.


Stopped watching it about half hour in because of its horribleness. It encompasses so many of the things that seemed to plague movies in the late 80s--one of them being Kevin Costner.


Tootsie
This has a lot of the horribleness of early 80s movies (mostly the music), but is at last entertaining. Plus it has Jessica Lange, Geena Davis and Teri Garr.
TOS
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ad astra

liked it in the theatre, but now i find it fairly bleak
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Séamas posted:
Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

Started watching this because my kids have seen and liked the errol Flynn Robin Hood. Also because the whole family likes Alan Rickman.


Stopped watching it about half hour in because of its horribleness. It encompasses so many of the things that seemed to plague movies in the late 80s--one of them being Kevin Costner.

However, this movie is prerequisite viewing for the enjoyment of Mel Brooks', Robin Hood: Men in Tights, in which all the best jokes revolve around the knowledge and understanding of how awful this movie is.
jkahless Custom Title
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Mad Max 1-4. What a beautiful through filmmaking history. Each film is so beautifully crafted and builds on the last in terms of skill and scope.

The first is a spare nihilistic art film. Unapproachable to many, it takes the adage show don’t tell to heart so much it loses a little focus, but sets the stage for the mythos that will develop.

The Road Warrior is classic for a reason. It gets the show/tell balance perfect, and only really suffers from the filmmaking limitations of the time.

Beyond Thunderdome continues building the universe. It starts examining what society would result from the universe that has been set up. It veers into overplotting at times, but pays better attention to consistency and world building through costuming and set dec.

Fury Road returns to the show/tell balance of Road Warrior, and uses the modern capacity for world building to its full extent, leaving us with a brilliantly executed film that uses modern filmmaking techniques and the juxtaposition of restraint and extravagance to deliver what’s pretty much a perfect modern action movie.

I also really enjoy the view that Max is a myth more than a Man. If you view every film after the first as an oral retelling of a Robin Hood like figure, it brings a wonderful perspective on the development and substance of myth.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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American Graffiti
I find it amazing that this movie was focused on a nostalgia for an era that was merely 11 years earlier.
You can see just how much the whole world seemed to change between the time the movie takes place and the time the movie was filmed.
Overall it is pretty much a just OK take on the coming of age, but the selected music is all very good and it captures what it sets out to do very well. Helped to make 1970s nostalgia for the 50s such a huge thing.
Lucas' best movie.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Metacell posted:
Séamas posted:
Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

Started watching this because my kids have seen and liked the errol Flynn Robin Hood. Also because the whole family likes Alan Rickman.


Stopped watching it about half hour in because of its horribleness. It encompasses so many of the things that seemed to plague movies in the late 80s--one of them being Kevin Costner.

However, this movie is prerequisite viewing for the enjoyment of Mel Brooks', Robin Hood: Men in Tights, in which all the best jokes revolve around the knowledge and understanding of how awful this movie is.

A superior movie.

I'm a sucker for the Erroll Flynn version, of course, but has anyone ever made a good Robin Hood movie?
juice Inadvertently correct
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Pithecanthropus posted:
Metacell posted:
Séamas posted:
Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

Started watching this because my kids have seen and liked the errol Flynn Robin Hood. Also because the whole family likes Alan Rickman.


Stopped watching it about half hour in because of its horribleness. It encompasses so many of the things that seemed to plague movies in the late 80s--one of them being Kevin Costner.

However, this movie is prerequisite viewing for the enjoyment of Mel Brooks', Robin Hood: Men in Tights, in which all the best jokes revolve around the knowledge and understanding of how awful this movie is.

A superior movie.

I'm a sucker for the Erroll Flynn version, of course, but has anyone ever made a good Robin Hood movie?

Other than the Mel Brooks version?
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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I am a huge fan of Mel Brooks, but his last good movie (as director) was History of the World Pt 1.
Men in Tights and Spaceballs just didn't have a cast that could brig his humor to life.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Pithecanthropus posted:

I'm a sucker for the Erroll Flynn version, of course, but has anyone ever made a good Robin Hood movie?



I dunno, I think the Errol Flynn one was great.
I live when he makes the entrance with the deer on his shoulders and uses it to take out three or four guards.
We don't have a ton of family tradition in my house, but Adventures of Robin Hood and the Last Waltz are watched every Thanksgiving.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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For whatever reason, not matter the production or presentation, I can't get myself to care about the Robin Hood story. It's just soooo uninteresting.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Séamas posted:
I am a huge fan of Mel Brooks, but his last good movie (as director) was History of the World Pt 1.
Men in Tights and Spaceballs just didn't have a cast that could brig his humor to life.

No, his first bad movie was History of the World Pt 1. Robin Hood: Men in Tights has Dave Chappelle, Isaac Hayes, Tracy Ulman, Dom Deluise, Patrick Stewart, and Dick van Patten in it. It's a classic, it just came out at the wrong time, when this kind of entertainment was no longer en vogue.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Robert B. posted:
For whatever reason, not matter the production or presentation, I can't get myself to care about the Robin Hood story. It's just soooo uninteresting.

The story of Robin Hood is heavily based on the Ramayana. That is to say, Ram, the 7th avatar of Vishnu, was the first historical version of Robin Hood (And yes, Maid Marian is Sita/Lakshmi). That makes it interesting for me.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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And the Sheriff of Nottingham is absolutely Ravana the Rakshasa Prince.
Network (1976) Brilliant. Highly recommended.
TOS
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Pithecanthropus posted:
Metacell posted:
Séamas posted:
Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

Started watching this because my kids have seen and liked the errol Flynn Robin Hood. Also because the whole family likes Alan Rickman.


Stopped watching it about half hour in because of its horribleness. It encompasses so many of the things that seemed to plague movies in the late 80s--one of them being Kevin Costner.

However, this movie is prerequisite viewing for the enjoyment of Mel Brooks', Robin Hood: Men in Tights, in which all the best jokes revolve around the knowledge and understanding of how awful this movie is.

A superior movie.

I'm a sucker for the Erroll Flynn version, of course, but has anyone ever made a good Robin Hood movie?


robin and marian, sean connery and audrey hepburn, as i recall it was pretty good
TOS
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Séamas posted:
American Graffiti
I find it amazing that this movie was focused on a nostalgia for an era that was merely 11 years earlier.
You can see just how much the whole world seemed to change between the time the movie takes place and the time the movie was filmed.
Overall it is pretty much a just OK take on the coming of age, but the selected music is all very good and it captures what it sets out to do very well. Helped to make 1970s nostalgia for the 50s such a huge thing.
Lucas' best movie.


it's a statement of just how much happened in the 1960s

to a lot of folks, the time before assassinations, protests, war, riots, watergate, feminism, black power, stonewall, weed, casual sex, the demise of the hollywood studios (and the hays code) seemed like paradise lost

still a popular sentiment
Deadpool 2

Better than the first since they got a budget for this one.
Why didn't Cable just rip the collar off?
ukimalefu Canadized
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Next May the 4th, I will watch... only the original Star Wars.

I want the watch them all in one day sometime , including Solo and Rogue One, but I don't have them all right now. I only have original trilogy, prequel trilogy, and episode 9.

But I have watched them all. AND, liked them all Image
ukimalefu posted:
Next May the 4th, I will watch... only the original Star Wars.

I want the watch them all in one day sometime , including Solo and Rogue One, but I don't have them all right now. I only have original trilogy, prequel trilogy, and episode 9.

But I have watched them all. AND, liked them all Image


I like all the new ones and I watched them in reverse order of release. But not the original 3. Some of the characters are muppets and that takes me too far out of the story and into Sesame Street territory. I can't get past that. So I substituted the 3 Family Guy episodes. If I'm going to be laughing at what I'm watching it might as well be intentional.

But on the whole I think its an entertaining series of movies.
ukimalefu Canadized
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Well... uhm... technically, Yoda IS a muppet.
jkahless Custom Title
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Babe - Terrifically crafted kids film, that works on an adult level just as well. I'm looking forwards to watching the follow up Babe : Pig in the City.

Written and produced by George Miller, I like to watch it with the same mindset as watching Mad Max.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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TOS posted:
Séamas posted:
American Graffiti
I find it amazing that this movie was focused on a nostalgia for an era that was merely 11 years earlier.
You can see just how much the whole world seemed to change between the time the movie takes place and the time the movie was filmed.
Overall it is pretty much a just OK take on the coming of age, but the selected music is all very good and it captures what it sets out to do very well. Helped to make 1970s nostalgia for the 50s such a huge thing.
Lucas' best movie.


it's a statement of just how much happened in the 1960s

to a lot of folks, the time before assassinations, protests, war, riots, watergate, feminism, black power, stonewall, weed, casual sex, the demise of the hollywood studios (and the hays code) seemed like paradise lost



Also the Beatles.

There was a whole music scene (especially in New Jersey) where musicians adopted a "pre-Beatles" sound, where they pretty much avoided any urge to show the Beatle influence--almost a parallel to the "Pre-Raphaelite" movement in painting.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Raising Arizona (1987)the Coen brothers' second written & directed movie. My wife had never seen it, and a friend loaned us his DVD copy. My god! I had forgotten how funny that movie was. I'd put it right next to The Big Lebowski as their greatest comedy.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Pithecanthropus posted:
Raising Arizona (1987)the Coen brothers' second written & directed movie. My wife had never seen it, and a friend loaned us his DVD copy. My god! I had forgotten how funny that movie was. I'd put it right next to The Big Lebowski as their greatest comedy.

I remember catching the chase sequence (where he steals the diapers), when a suite-mate in college was watching a VHS copy of it (1987?), and was instantly taken in. One of my favorite movies of theirs.
Have you seen their first movie? Blood Simple. It's a thriller and an excellent one.

The last couple of movies that I have seen from them--more recent efforts--have left me cold (Hail, Caesar! and Inside Llewyn Davis).
I know people don't rate it highly, but as far as their comedies go, I love Hudsucker Proxy.
It perhaps lays on the send-up of the Frank Capra-meets Howard Hawks type movie a bit much, but i thought it worked.
jkahless Custom Title
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Séamas posted:
Pithecanthropus posted:
Raising Arizona (1987)the Coen brothers' second written & directed movie. My wife had never seen it, and a friend loaned us his DVD copy. My god! I had forgotten how funny that movie was. I'd put it right next to The Big Lebowski as their greatest comedy.

I remember catching the chase sequence (where he steals the diapers), when a suite-mate in college was watching a VHS copy of it (1987?), and was instantly taken in. One of my favorite movies of theirs.
Have you seen their first movie? Blood Simple. It's a thriller and an excellent one.

The last couple of movies that I have seen from them--more recent efforts--have left me cold (Hail, Caesar! and Inside Llewyn Davis).
I know people don't rate it highly, but as far as their comedies go, I love Hudsucker Proxy.
It perhaps lays on the send-up of the Frank Capra-meets Howard Hawks type movie a bit much, but i thought it worked.


Hail! Caesar is a lot funnier if you're adjecent to filmmakers. It's full of the self referential stuff artists love. The dance numbers were gorgeously executed, I could watch those sailor boys all night long!
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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jkahless posted:


Hail! Caesar is a lot funnier if you're adjecent to filmmakers. It's full of the self referential stuff artists love. The dance numbers were gorgeously executed, I could watch those sailor boys all night long!



YES. We re-watched it the other night and that dance number was really excellent and I loved the double entendres. (they do love dialogue and dialects)

I thought the movie as a whole was OK, but not one of their better efforts--but then again, I find that their movies are rewarded by second and third viewings.

I remember seeing Big Lebowski in the theater, and was very much looking forward to it, having liked all the previous movies I saw from them.
I was not impressed with it. Liked moments but felt let down.
Then a couple years later my wife rented it, and I liked it more. We watched it again before returning it. Not long after, we bought our first DVD player--and Lebowski was the first DVD.
jkahless Custom Title
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Séamas posted:
jkahless posted:


Hail! Caesar is a lot funnier if you're adjecent to filmmakers. It's full of the self referential stuff artists love. The dance numbers were gorgeously executed, I could watch those sailor boys all night long!



YES. We re-watched it the other night and that dance number was really excellent and I loved the double entendres. (they do love dialogue and dialects)

I thought the movie as a whole was OK, but not one of their better efforts--but then again, I find that their movies are rewarded by second and third viewings.

I remember seeing Big Lebowski in the theater, and was very much looking forward to it, having liked all the previous movies I saw from them.
I was not impressed with it. Liked moments but felt let down.
Then a couple years later my wife rented it, and I liked it more. We watched it again before returning it. Not long after, we bought our first DVD player--and Lebowski was the first DVD.


I get that entirely, I find the more details I notice and understand, the more their films flow. I kind of lucked out with Hail! Caesar, having grown up steeped in musical theatre and showbiz types. I've gotta rewatch TBL, Ive only seen it once, and it's an unimpressive memory.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Pithecanthropus posted:
Raising Arizona (1987)the Coen brothers' second written & directed movie. My wife had never seen it, and a friend loaned us his DVD copy. My god! I had forgotten how funny that movie was. I'd put it right next to The Big Lebowski as their greatest comedy.

This is Nicholas Cage's best movie.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Metacell posted:
Pithecanthropus posted:
Raising Arizona (1987)the Coen brothers' second written & directed movie. My wife had never seen it, and a friend loaned us his DVD copy. My god! I had forgotten how funny that movie was. I'd put it right next to The Big Lebowski as their greatest comedy.

This is Nicholas Cage's best movie.


Agreed.

I remember seeing this in the theater. What was funny is that everybody there watching pretty much knew which part of Arizona the setting and the people were supposed to be: "Yep, Apache Junction."
"Unpainted Arizona!"
I loved that. I think that actor passed away not too long ago.

Don't ever watch "The Ladykillers" by the Coen brothers. Seriously bad mis-step.
Altered States (1980) William Hurt, Blair brown, Bob Balaban. Fun pretentious nonsense about scientists experimenting with isolation tanks and mescaline who stumble across the secret to consciousness, life and the meaning of it all. Bad but in a good way.
Directed by ken Russell. I prefer his "Lair Of The White Worm" for over-the-top Russell, but Altered States has its share of whacked out imagery.
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Ribtor posted:
"Unpainted Arizona!"
I loved that. I think that actor passed away not too long ago.

Don't ever watch "The Ladykillers" by the Coen brothers. Seriously bad mis-step.

I did watch that one. Tom Hanks was wonderful, the rest was a little too... meh.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Ribtor posted:
"Unpainted Arizona!"
I loved that. I think that actor passed away not too long ago.



IIRC he died not long after making that movie. I think his performance in that would have opened many doors.

"or my name isn't Nathan Arizona" (it wasn't)

"would you shop at a store called Unpainted Huffheins?"

jkahless posted:
I've gotta rewatch TBL, Ive only seen it once, and it's an unimpressive memory.


Yeah, I think my initial disappointment was i thought the plot and resolution went nowhere.

Subsequent viewings, that bothered me less and less, as did the seemingly random insertion of oddball characters --or the fact that it takes place in the First Gulf war that had little to do with the plot. It all ends up seeming to fit better with the Dude's existence.
Planet Of The Humans (2019) Documentary by Jeff Gibbs about the failings of some prominent leaders of the green movement. Don't watch if you think electric cars, bio-mass and solar and wind tech are the answer to the big problem. You will throw things at your screen and shout at the film-maker in anger and frustration. Don't watch it. You'll hate it. If there are failings in detail the bigger truth is there. I liked it.

Marathon Man (1976) Brilliant.

Pat And Mike (1952) Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. A thin contrived excuse to show off Ms Hepburn's athletic skills and not much else. That being said, it's still Tracy and Hepburn; cherce!
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Ribtor posted:
Altered States (1980) William Hurt, Blair brown, Bob Balaban. Fun pretentious nonsense about scientists experimenting with isolation tanks and mescaline who stumble across the secret to consciousness, life and the meaning of it all. Bad but in a good way.
Directed by ken Russell. I prefer his "Lair Of The White Worm" for over-the-top Russell, but Altered States has its share of whacked out imagery.

Altered States is IMO one of the greatest movies of its era and is a movie idea desperately deserving of a modern remake. I also loved Lair of the White Worm, Gothic is another great one. I have seen Salome's Last Dance...but I couldn't recommend it unless you are really into the weird human waste. To my shame, I've not watched Tommy or Lisztomania, but I'm surely going to soon. Ken Russell is up there with Cronenberg
as my kind of filmmaker. A little bit Federico Fellini a little bit John Carpenter.

Which brings me to...

The Platform (2019, Netflix)

Spanish existential surrealist dystopian sci-fi thriller. It's The Cube meets Animal Farm meets Dante's Inferno. Despite it's set-piece minimalism it occasionally achieves a visual poetry worthy of The Lord of the Rings. Although it might not achieve any real narrative sense of completion, by the end I fell in love with this movie. It left me in tears. Not for the faint of heart or weak of philosophy.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Saving Mr. Banks
Being a Disney movie it is sure to paint M. Disney in the most complimentary light. It depicts the creator of Marry Poppins (P.L. Travers) as the ultimate adversary to Disney.
She's difficult and judgmental and openly insults the entire output of the movie studio (I am not a huge Disney fan, but his first few animated features are film masterpieces).
It has flashbacks to her difficult past, because an unhappy childhood is moviedom's ultimate reasoning for troubled adulthood.

It's pretty good, I especially liked the attention to the Sherman brothers, whose musical output really is underhearalded. I especially like the fact that they center attention to "Let's Go Fly a Kite", which imho is one of the best pieces of music in the Mary Poppins movie.

If there was ever characters better drawn in film than in the book, they would be Julie Andrew's Mary Poppins and Gene Wilder's Willie Wonka.
Birds Of Prey (And The Fantabulous Emancipation Of One Harley Quinn) (2020)

I liked it.
Avengers: Endgame

Fitting end for Captain America, not so sure about Iron Man.
I know it's for actor contractual reasons but it was funny when they would un-helmet in the middle of the battle just to talk to each other or for no reason whatsoever. That's how you get shot in the head.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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The Avenger costume/armor is far less fun when everything became nanobots.
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What was the last movie you saw?

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