What was the last movie you saw?

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dv
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UHF, finally. Funny here and there.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Watched the HBO Deadwood movie. It was a fun return to the show, but ultimately unsatisfying. Want more.
TOS
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Metacell posted:
Godzilla king of the monsters

Ghidorah is really beautiful, stunning really.


agreed

they did a heck of a job on the monsters ... mothra's first wing-spreading was pretty amazing too
TOS
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obvs precoupado
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Dark Phoenix.

I liked it.
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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TOS posted:
Metacell posted:
Godzilla king of the monsters

Ghidorah is really beautiful, stunning really.


agreed

they did a heck of a job on the monsters ... mothra's first wing-spreading was pretty amazing too


Too much people. Not enough monsters.
dv
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Endgame and Godzilla today. Both were pretty amazing, for different reasons.

Engame was like watching all your friends graduate college; human waste's over and done and some you won't see again. Godzilla was just plain fun, although part of me thinks Watanabe was like, "Ok fine, I'll be in your stupid sequel but only if my character dies. Damn."
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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dv posted:
Endgame and Godzilla today. Both were pretty amazing, for different reasons.

Engame was like watching all your friends graduate college; human waste's over and done and some you won't see again. Godzilla was just plain fun, although part of me thinks Watanabe was like, "Ok fine, I'll be in your stupid sequel but only if my character dies. Damn."

How could you watch both of those in one day without breaking it up with a dose of folk music documentaries or something? Eventually my eyes would just become one big explosion.
Christopher Robin (2018)

Ewan McGregor plays grown up Christopher Robin who's a working stiff so Pooh and company come back to remind him what's important in life.

Loved it, I teared up a couple of times. Hell, I still do with the cartoon when Christopher has to leave for school.
I liked how the Hundred Acre Wood gang were real and not his imagination as if it were Calvin and Hobbes.
This reminded me of Big Fish from Tim Burton which also stars McGregor.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Séamas posted:
Ribtor posted:
The Secret Of My Success (1987) Michael J Fox, Helen Slater. Ambitious young man works his way up from the mail-room to an executive position through subterfuge, with shenanigans aplenty. Outrageously 80s in fashion, sensibilities and music. If a parody were made of an 80s movie today, some people might think this is a bit over the top.


It might be because of my personal scope of reference having graduated High School in'85, but I always felt there was a huge difference between early 80s and late 80s --but the whole decade had an awful pop culture parody look.

I know this is late but the reason the early 80's seems so different than the late 80's is because, culturally, the 70's didn't end until about 1984. The free wheeling drugs and sex ethos of the 70's ground to a halt with the emergence of HIV and waves of celebs hitting treatment centers for drugs.
Less Than Zero was the requiem for that era.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Pariah posted:
Séamas posted:
Ribtor posted:
The Secret Of My Success (1987) Michael J Fox, Helen Slater. Ambitious young man works his way up from the mail-room to an executive position through subterfuge, with shenanigans aplenty. Outrageously 80s in fashion, sensibilities and music. If a parody were made of an 80s movie today, some people might think this is a bit over the top.


It might be because of my personal scope of reference having graduated High School in'85, but I always felt there was a huge difference between early 80s and late 80s --but the whole decade had an awful pop culture parody look.

I know this is late but the reason the early 80's seems so different than the late 80's is because, culturally, the 70's didn't end until about 1984. The free wheeling drugs and sex ethos of the 70's ground to a halt with the emergence of HIV and waves of celebs hitting treatment centers for drugs.
Less Than Zero was the requiem for that era.


From my perspective there seemed to be a switch with the whole feel.

Music-wise I associate the early 80s with New Wave, a second wave of British pop, sythesizers, Members Only jackets, funky haircuts MTV and that sort of thing. Cocaine was big ( I was first exposed to it as a 16 year old in '83).


The later 80s seemed to peel back some of the exterior of that stuff and for some odd reason the Grateful Dead became relevant again --and with it other jam bands and psychedelic drugs. The hair metal scene gave way to the more roots orientated bands due to GnR, etc


Locally, my region had a thriving live music scene all through the 70s-the early 80s. This was aided by NYS having a drinking age of 18.
I never got to see any of this because they raised it first to 19 and then to 21 at some point in '84 or so.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Rolling Thunder Revue
This Martin Scorsese documentary on Netflix chronicles Bob Dylan's 1975 "Rolling Thunder Revue" barnstorming tour, where Dylan assembled a farly large band, plus a number of old friends, such as Joan Baez, Rambin' Jack Elliott, Roger McGuin and later Joni Mitchell.
The tour was considered a really great one, hitting smaller venues in the North East USA. It has been known that there was considerable footage shot of this tour as Dylan planned on it also being a movie--which was released a few years later as Renaldo and Clara--which was a poorly received, confusing mess of a movie.
What makes Scorsese's movie interesting is besides having some great footage of the performances, it also weaves in some absolutely ridiculous fiction, including a fictional congressman (rep Tanner from Altman's Tanner '88) as well as a teenage Sharon Stone becoming a groupie of sorts (her bit is pretty funny). Just about all the talking heads in this are fictional. Missing in all of this was Dylan's wife at the time (soon to be ex wife) Sara--who was the "Clara" from the previous movie.
These added bits of fiction are of course familiar to Dylan fans who have seen him create these bits since his first album.

Network
Up until the other day, I had never seen this whole movie, only knowing the famous "I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore" scene. I think I saw some bit of this when it was broadcast on television, but was too young to sit through the whole thing.
I suppose it is debatable as to how well this has aged--but seeing how it has recently been turned into a Broadway play, a good part of the story is still considerably relevant.
IMHO: the story was one of the better and most scathing critiques of the nature of media and the danger of mixing entertainment and rating with telling the news. It pokes its finger in the eye of corporate media, capitalism, ambition, leftist radicals and most importantly--the audience.

A Clockwork Orange
I've probably seen this at least a dozen times. It is always jarring. Fascinating to look at--even though it has so much disturbing imagery. Kubrick was taken to task by critics for the way the violence is portrayed as almost beautiful--which I suppose was part of the point, though I think the intended point or argument made both in the movie and the novel (though different) seem to get lost in midst of all the shocking episodes.
Vertigo (1958) Classic Hitchcock. James Stewart, Kim Novak. I hate the ending but I suppose it was inevitable.
TOS
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baby driver

greatly overrated
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Ribtor posted:
Vertigo (1958) Classic Hitchcock. James Stewart, Kim Novak. I hate the ending but I suppose it was inevitable.


The last half-hour or the last half-minute?


Either way I agree.
I'm the same way with Rear Window.
Taken on its own, as an exercise in film-making it's great.
As a satisfying story with a credible plot and people acting in believable ways the third act falls down. But, "credibility" is a minor standard placed against the rest of what makes a movie good, so I'll take Hitchcock any day.

For me the ultimate Hichcock is "Rope". It's got story, acting and film-making tricks that all works.
maurvir Steamed meat popsicle
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Ribtor posted:
Taken on its own, as an exercise in film-making it's great.
As a satisfying story with a credible plot and people acting in believable ways the third act falls down. But, "credibility" is a minor standard placed against the rest of what makes a movie good, so I'll take Hitchcock any day.

For me the ultimate Hichcock is "Rope". It's got story, acting and film-making tricks that all works.


Still doesn't hold a candle to this:

Image
Robert B. Dandy Highwayman
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Finally saw Avengers: Ender’s Game.
Robert B. posted:
Too much people. Not enough monsters.


Same here. But the monster action was pretty damn good.

dv posted:
part of me thinks Watanabe was like, "Ok fine, I'll be in your stupid sequel but only if my character dies. Damn."


That's what happens to every character named Dr. Serizawa.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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j_tso posted:
Robert B. posted:
Too much people. Not enough monsters.


Same here. But the monster action was pretty damn good.

dv posted:
part of me thinks Watanabe was like, "Ok fine, I'll be in your stupid sequel but only if my character dies. Damn."


That's what happens to every character named Dr. Serizawa.

Right, I understand Hollywood tried too hard to make it "relatable" to "normal" "American" "families" which was a stupid thing to do in the first place...but I think you could just cut about 30 minutes out (it is LONG!!!) to get a perfect fast paced monster action movie.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Ribtor posted:

For me the ultimate Hichcock is "Rope". It's got story, acting and film-making tricks that all works.



I have not seen that, but just watched Strangers on a Train which I liked considerably more than either Rear Window or Vertigo.
The film plays out in real time (reel time) with long continuous shots, each approximately one full reel of film, 9 to 10 minutes, with one obvious edit where the theatre projectionist would change reels. That means each reel-length scene had to be done in one take.
Pariah Know Your Enemy
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Séamas posted:
Pariah posted:
Séamas posted:
Ribtor posted:
The Secret Of My Success (1987) Michael J Fox, Helen Slater. Ambitious young man works his way up from the mail-room to an executive position through subterfuge, with shenanigans aplenty. Outrageously 80s in fashion, sensibilities and music. If a parody were made of an 80s movie today, some people might think this is a bit over the top.


It might be because of my personal scope of reference having graduated High School in'85, but I always felt there was a huge difference between early 80s and late 80s --but the whole decade had an awful pop culture parody look.

I know this is late but the reason the early 80's seems so different than the late 80's is because, culturally, the 70's didn't end until about 1984. The free wheeling drugs and sex ethos of the 70's ground to a halt with the emergence of HIV and waves of celebs hitting treatment centers for drugs.
Less Than Zero was the requiem for that era.


From my perspective there seemed to be a switch with the whole feel.

Music-wise I associate the early 80s with New Wave, a second wave of British pop, sythesizers, Members Only jackets, funky haircuts MTV and that sort of thing. Cocaine was big ( I was first exposed to it as a 16 year old in '83).


The later 80s seemed to peel back some of the exterior of that stuff and for some odd reason the Grateful Dead became relevant again --and with it other jam bands and psychedelic drugs. The hair metal scene gave way to the more roots orientated bands due to GnR, etc


Locally, my region had a thriving live music scene all through the 70s-the early 80s. This was aided by NYS having a drinking age of 18.
I never got to see any of this because they raised it first to 19 and then to 21 at some point in '84 or so.

While "new Wave" sprang into popularity at the start of the 80's, the New Wave scene started in the early 70s. Roxy Music is the best known of the original New Wave bands, they were just not called that until that term was coined much latter.
If you want to hear where practically all of the latter New Wave sound came from just listen to Roxy Music's first 3 studio albums and their one Live album.
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What was the last movie you saw?

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