What was the last movie you saw?

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Sometimes A Great Notion (1971) Paul Newman, Henry Fonda, Lee Remick, Michael Sarrazin. Hard times for an Oregon logging family. Great film.
Vulture 420
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The Conjuring 2. Really good for a horror movie, nice balance between classic demonic motifs and plain haunting with revamped modern imagery taking The Exorcist into the 21st century while telling story from the 1970s.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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Deliverance (1972)
I saw it 25 years ago on VHS and didn't think much of it I was more impressed with it this time around. The story and the acting (especially Reynolds) is much better than I remembered. I think 25 years ago I watched so many "shocking" movies and scenes I had become jaded by them.


Beverly Hills Cop (1984)
Probably the best of the hybrid police action/comedy. It does both aspects very well. Apparently this was supposed to be a straight-up cop action movie starring Sylvester Stallone. It would have been totally forgettable. Much of the humorous dialogue was ad-libbed by Eddie Murphy who was definitely in his prime.



Ronnie Cox appears in both movies.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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I only saw Deliverance once, and within the last year or so. My opinion was, and is,
Geesie posted:

I think a huge part of why the movie worked was acting and cinematography. The plot and dialogue were sure nothing to get excited about.

user Stupid cockwomble
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banjo boy was the highlight
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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It was a well shot and acted monster movie and that's really all it was.
user Stupid cockwomble
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yew use yer tongue prettier than a Kansas City whore
TOS
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Geesie posted:
It was a well shot and acted monster movie and that's really all it was.


i'm not sure many people see it as anything more significant than that
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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The Revenant (2015)

:up:
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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TOS posted:
Geesie posted:
It was a well shot and acted monster movie and that's really all it was.


i'm not sure many people see it as anything more significant than that

I think there's a Hitchcockian element of suspense (unresolved) in not knowing what really happened in the last parts of the film that obviously haunts the protagonist.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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TOS posted:
Geesie posted:
It was a well shot and acted monster movie and that's really all it was.


i'm not sure many people see it as anything more significant than that


They have. Roger Ebert wrote this about it:
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Dickey, who wrote the original novel and the screenplay, lards this plot with a lot of significance -- universal, local, whatever happens to be on the market. He is clearly under the impression that he is telling us something about the nature of man, and particularly civilized man's ability to survive primitive challenges

(and then disagrees)
All Is Lost (2013) Robert Redford alone on a sinking sailboat in the Indian Ocean. Almost no spoken word through the entire film.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Pee-Wee's Big holiday
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Batman v Superman

I really wanted to hate it. First of all, it's VS not v. My biggest problem is that they go too far from DC's canon for my taste (or what I think Batman and Superman should be, I'm not a DC expert). My problem with this Superman is Man of Steel. My problem with this Batman, besides being way too angry, is how easily he kills, even with guns. I didn't know Wonder Woman could be SO powerful, but I'm not gonna complain about her.

Having said that, the movie's not so bad.

I like my DC Comics live action on TV. Gotham, Arrow, The Flash. I really like those.

But I still prefer Marvel. On TV and movies :p
The acting in BvS was decent. Gal Gadot was a great Wonder Woman. I like Affleck as Batman, and have good feelings about the Affleck helmed Batman stand alone film.

The problem with BvS is Zac Snyder. He just doesn't understand the characters, and by trying to remould them in Randian archetypes, ends up just stick fiddling things up. Also, the whole grim dark blatherskite is just getting tired. People need to step away from the ideas of Frank Miller and realize that people loved these characters before they were gritty, and while some of us like the occasional foray into it when done well (Nolan), the same cannot be said when done poorly, like Snyder has managed in his DC outings so far.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Captain America Civil War

I may be biased, but Marvel knows how to do it right

:up: :spidey: :ironman:
user Stupid cockwomble
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Never much cared for DC when I was a kid reading comics. Too self-righteous and authoritarian.

It was always Marvel for me, too.
ukimalefu posted:
Captain America Civil War

I may be biased, but Marvel knows how to do it right

:up: :spidey: :ironman:


:up:

Civil War was great. A few minor nits, but a solid, solid film.
Trapeze (1956) Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis, Gina Lollobrigida. Pure cheese. Lancaster does a lot of his own flying.
TOS
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user posted:
Never much cared for DC when I was a kid reading comics. Too self-righteous and authoritarian.

It was always Marvel for me, too.


i never liked most of their main superhero comics ... however their side-projects could be phenomenal, like watchmen or sandman or whatevs

they also did some great batman comix back in the day
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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I think fables would do great as an HBO or Netflix series.

Even just a miniseries following Bigby could be phenomenal.
obvs Social Distancing Grandmaster
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Tangerine.

Decent movie.

This movie was filmed on the same block where I was working in Los Angeles. From the very first scene I was like "Oh, wait, hey I know all of these places."

:lol:
dv
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Finally saw Batman v. Superman.

It was actually a much better movie than I expected, considering all the hate.
The International (2009) Clive Owen and Naomi Watts. Rogue Interpol agent and New York Asst. DA go after Eurotrash bankers. A replica Guggenheim Museum was custom built for the shootout scene. Ok-ish movie.

The Road (2009) Viggo Mortensen. Grim post apocalyptic story of a dad doing what it takes to protect his son from roving gangs of cannibals. Well shot.

Batman vs Superman seemed fine for its genre. I don't get the hate either. Maybe dark sets and dim lighting eases the CGI demands.
TOS
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obvs posted:
Tangerine.

Decent movie.

This movie was filmed on the same block where I was working in Los Angeles. From the very first scene I was like "Oh, wait, hey I know all of these places."

:lol:


i seem to recall it was filmed in a scuzzy part of town ... no wonder you were miserable there!
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It was surreal in the opening shots of the movie to see the buildings across the street from my former workplace, the same view I'd seen every day as I'd driven into work or the few times I'd ventured out on foot to try to find lunch in the middle of the day(and found no place worth eating). I didn't know the block was infamous for transgender prostitution.

It was really strange to read that article and know about the Walgreens and the donut shop and the laundromat and the Indian food place. I bought some pretzels and hummus from that Walgreens once.

I didn't know the backstory about the neighborhood, but I knew that it was a really depressing place and from the moment I got there my only inclination was to get as far away as possible. They tell you that in L.A. you should try to live near where you work, and I knew with all of my being that after exploring that neighborhood I didn't want to exist anywhere near there.

I do remember after I interviewed there that I really needed to pee, so I used my GPS to find the closest Ralph's(because the convenience stores wouldn't let anyone use the restrooms, which I guess makes sense now), and I walked around the Ralph's and saw more gay couples and more transgender people than I'd ever seen in one place, and then when I went to the restroom it was obvious that there were at least two people participating in some activity in one of the stalls, and I was grossed out and opened the door using my foot, and then walked around the store having the weirdest thoughts.
dv
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obvs posted:
...the weirdest thoughts.


?
obvs Social Distancing Grandmaster
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I don't think that a single one of my thoughts when walking around that store had anything to do with sexual attraction.

My first thoughts on that day were "Oh, wow, this seems like a very open neighborhood and must be very accepting," mixed with a surreal "I've never seen so many LGBT people in one area in my life in just an everyday situation and not on some kind of special occasion." In the restroom when I heard people in the stall I was actually giggling until I needed to open the door and didn't find any soap or towels and was trying to find a way to open the door with my foot, and after I got out of the restroom safely I was smiling and kind of giggling, too.

I don't judge people for being prostitutes. People do whatever they need to to survive, and if that's what someone wants to do or if it's what someone *has to* do, I am not qualified to judge and shouldn't judge. There's nothing inherently unethical about prostitution. Prostitutes bring more joy and positivity to the world than people in a lot of other professions.

I don't know for sure whether whatever was happening in that stall was just a hookup or paid, but it sounded like all three occupants were making use of their time.

It was only as I actually went and explored the neighborhood and a little further out that I found that there was poverty and that it seemed near impossible to find an apartment, but it didn't take long to figure out I didn't want to be there.

I can't explain how surreal it was that this movie exists, and out of all of the odds, Los Angeles being this absolutely enormous city, how I ended up with a job that was literally within walking distance of this, on the same block, literally within line of sight. Google Maps says the distance is 0.2 miles. It wasn't "down the street", but "across the street".
TOS
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well to me, the sex trade is all about exploitation even if people choose to be in it
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Oh for the good old days when the whore was the most respected person in the village:

Sacred Prostitutes
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The Latin term had its root in the Vedic, an early Sanskrit language, wherein the word puta is defined as pure and holy. The cave, the pit, the hole, and the bottomless black lake were metaphors for the Great Goddess, She who is unnameable, that darkness primordial from which all life (light) is born. She is the Everything and The Nothing -- Hole-y, Holy, Wholly. The Sacred Whore at work was, in fact, the manifestation the Great Goddess.

Today these ideas are not completely lost. The Hebrew folk dance named the hora, a tradition at Jewish weddings, is named after the circle dances of the sacred harlots. Such holy harlots were often "brides of God" similar to modern nuns, the "brides of Christ." The holy harlots were set apart to give birth to Sons of God. In other words, these women had the job of changing human-animal into human-god.

The separation into priestess and prostitute, or sacred and profane polarities, occurred for western civilization when the early fathers of Christianity claimed power by abolishing goddess worship and other nature-based pagan religions. In actuality the bipartite woman, both whore and madonna, was a construct of the early Papal Councils around 600 AD. In the New Testament itself, there is nothing which proves that Magdalene was a repentent prostitute; other texts suggest that she was a spiritual teacher in her own right.

...

Ishtar, the Great Whore of Babylon, was sometimes called the Goddess Har since she was the mother of the Harlots. These Harlots were not prostitutes as we know them, but priestesses, sorceresses, prophets, and healers. Sacred Whores were known sometimes as the Holy Virgins of Goddesses such as Ishtar, Asherah, or Aphrodite. The famous Vestal Virgins were thought to have practiced secret sex magical rites in honor of the Roman Goddess Vesta, the same as the Greek goddess Hestia -- Goddess of the Hearth, or "center of the world."

"Virgin" did not mean possessing an intact hymen. A virgin was simply an unmarried woman, a woman who claimed ownership of herself. Think of Athena, the maiden goddess who jumped off a cliff rather than submit to wedlock. We see a similar story in the Hebraic tradition where Lilith, unwilling to subjugate herself to Adam in the male-dominant missionary position, exiled herself from paradise in exchange for her own sovereignty.

But Holy Whores weren't man-haters. Their function was dispensing the grace of the God/Goddess through sexual worship by sharing their bodies with worthy initiates and with each other.

obvs Social Distancing Grandmaster
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TOS posted:
well to me, the sex trade is all about exploitation even if people choose to be in it
For any person who's not self-employed, you work your whole life producing some amount of value, and your employer pays you some amount equivalent to only a portion of that value, and your employer keeps the rest. You work for free for at least some part of every day.

Prostitution, if voluntary and if properly regulated(and believe me; I'm not saying what happens on the streets is), is not necessarily any more exploitative than any other line of work. The goal should be to protect the workers rather than criminalize people who are just trying to get by.
TOS
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obvs posted:
TOS posted:
well to me, the sex trade is all about exploitation even if people choose to be in it
For any person who's not self-employed, you work your whole life producing some amount of value, and your employer pays you some amount equivalent to only a portion of that value, and your employer keeps the rest. You work for free for at least some part of every day.

Prostitution, if voluntary and if properly regulated(and believe me; I'm not saying what happens on the streets is), is not necessarily any more exploitative than any other line of work. The goal should be to protect the workers rather than criminalize people who are just trying to get by.


prostitution, with its associated risks, is not like some office job
obvs Social Distancing Grandmaster
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And having it remain illegal makes it riskier, not less risky.

It is something that enables sex-traffickers, both locally and internationally. It also invites abuse and violence, even from the very law enforcement who are supposed to be protecting people.
TOS
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fine philosophical argument

but the hard reality is that it's a dirty, squalid, awful business that's got plenty of violence, abuse and addiction
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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But enough about railroading.
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TOS posted:
fine philosophical argument

but the hard reality is that it's a dirty, squalid, awful business that's got plenty of violence, abuse and addiction
Hence my argument.

Keeping it illegal is doing nothing to fix that hard reality.

Like I said in one of my earlier posts:
The goal should be to protect the workers rather than criminalize people who are just trying to get by.

obvs posted:
... people who are just trying to get by.


That might also be the Johns!
Trainwreck (2015) Schumer can act when called upon, which was nice to see. The athletes, particularly LeBron, were credible and didn't appear overly awkward with their lines. Tilda Swinton looked like she was enjoying a light role for a change.
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Ribtor posted:
Trainwreck (2015) Schumer can act when called upon, which was nice to see. The athletes, particularly LeBron, were credible and didn't appear overly awkward with their lines. Tilda Swinton looked like she was enjoying a light role for a change.

John Cena KILLED it!
War of the Worlds (2005) I wanted the angst-ridden teen with daddy issues to get zapped, or better yet, left out of the story completely. I like this adaptation better than the 1953 film.

Dirty Wars (2013) Documentary on the activities of JSOC in A'stan and Yemen. Thin, but probably because it's hard to get solid material.
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What was the last movie you saw?

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