What was the last movie you saw?

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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I watched Odd Thomas. I read the Odd Thomas series of books by Dean Koontz and was actually surprised to see this on Netflix. I had high hopes for it, but it was a poorly made, poorly acted and poorly directed movie. I really shouldn't have been surprised, though. Watchers was one of his best books. It was made into a really really bad movie. Dean Koontz needs Stephen Kings screenwriters and creative control.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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The Boogens was a Dean Koontz classic! Srsly, tho, lest us not forget Demon Seed. The man is a prodigal writer of science fiction and horror.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Metacell posted:
The Boogens was a Dean Koontz classic! Srsly, tho, lest us not forget Demon Seed. The man is a prodigal writer of science fiction and horror.

Oh, i love to read his books. They just don't translate well to the big screen.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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TBH, I don't think King's books translate that well either, they just get bigger budgets.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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The Shining was good.
Steve McQueen: The Man and Le Mans

It's a documentary about the making of McQueen's racing movie. The 24 is next weekend so I watched this and the actual movie. Of course there's "never before seen on set footage" and interviews with former cast and racers in a dark, moody room. I didn't realize how disordered the production really was.

I also came out of this thinking McQueen was a lot less cool. A lot of the stories end with "he was such an uncouth individual, but man, he was so passionate about racing", which was blatherskite because he didn't race much after the movie.
Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Nice. Such familiar music I grew up with that's nice to finally see on screen.

X-Men X2 (2003) Can't be bothered to finish it. I give up on the series. My standards are pretty lax for movies but X-Men I can't stomach.
TOS
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Ribtor posted:
Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Nice. Such familiar music I grew up with that's nice to finally see on screen.

X-Men X2 (2003) Can't be bothered to finish it. I give up on the series. My standards are pretty lax for movies but X-Men I can't stomach.


that series was something of a disaster

i kind of think deadpool is the best x-men movie
The Princess And The pirate (1944) "I work my brains out for nine reels, and some bit player from Paramount comes over and steals my girl. That's the last picture I'll ever make for Goldwyn!"

Bob Hop, Virginia Mayo, Victor McLaglen and Walter Brennan as Featherhead. For when you need to smile.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Guardians Of The Galaxy
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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TOS posted:
Ribtor posted:
Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Nice. Such familiar music I grew up with that's nice to finally see on screen.

X-Men X2 (2003) Can't be bothered to finish it. I give up on the series. My standards are pretty lax for movies but X-Men I can't stomach.


that series was something of a disaster

i kind of think deadpool is the best x-men movie

The first X-Men movie probably feels trite and old hat now, but it was Marvels biggest breakthrough other than Spider-Man, and every Marvel movie has copied it's formula liberally.
I wanted a comedy, so Gods of Egypt. It didn't disappoint. ;)
dv
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Saw "The Intern" and "The Good Dinosaur" today.

Both were good. "The Intern" reminded me of some people I know.
dv
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Concussion was also good. If sad.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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The Peanuts movie (2015)

:up:
True Grit (1969) Brilliant. A perfect role for Wayne and Kim Darby was so good. Dennis Hopper in a small role and Robert Duvall as the bad guy.
juice Inadvertently correct
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Ribtor posted:
True Grit (1969) Brilliant. A perfect role for Wayne and Kim Darby was so good. Dennis Hopper in a small role and Robert Duvall as the bad guy.

I could not agree more.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Tokyo S.O.S. a.k.a. Godzilla-Mothra-Mechagodzilla, Tokyo--you're screwed!

This was the penultimate Japanese Godzilla movie, before the much lamented (but still enjoyable IMO) Godzilla Final Wars: the final film in the Toho franchise prior to the recent breakthrough American redub. It's also the only Japanese Godzilla movie I haven't seen before. Like all the millennial Godzilla films, it exists in it's own continuity with this being the sole exception, being a direct sequel to the previous Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla, a fantastic film I had the privilege of seeing at the Castro Theater, SF as part of a Tokusatsu festival with War of the Gargantuas. This movie also plays as a sequel to Mothra and Godzilla vs. Mothra.

Now to appreciate this movie, it goes without sayin you must "get" Godzilla movies overall...that each is a morality play dealing with contemporary issues of man vs. nature, war, technology, spirituality, ecology, etc. played large in a professional wrestling setting between folks in Noh-inspired rubber costumes and miniature modeled cities ripe for fireworks. If you can reach this far, you're already ready for the true meaning of happiness in life.

The real question is, how does this movie hold up against other Godzilla films? IMO, it does a good job between nostalgia and modernization, and includes the original actor from the 1950's Mothra film, together with his grandson and it's all rather quaint and charming. It also features the latest granddaughters of the twin faeries who attend Mothra, with modernized hypersexualised bare midriffs!! And they sing the remixed chant duet to summon Mothra who always comes across as an avatar of Parvati Devi to me.

Now the next question is, can you still enjoy this after mega-digital-3d Godzilla without laughing? But the reality is, Millennial era Godzilla is loaded with special effects and digital composition even if it's not all CGI, and it's kind of refreshing to see this sort of choreography. This version of Godzilla is a total badass as well, and it's probably the best Mothra you'll see until the 3D version comes out.

That leaves Mechagodzilla. The original MechaG comes from a different continuity where Godzilla has become the defender of Earth following the invasion of Ghidra and the people of Planet-X, and is originally an alien invention to defeat Godzilla. All the Godzilla movies since 1985 have restored Godzilla to being a force of nature at odds with mankind's advancement, and thus in the Heisei era, Mechagodzilla is re-conceived as a human invention in the ongoing fight to protect humans from Godzilla. The Millennial era takes it a step further, defining the current Godzilla as the 2nd Godzilla from Gigantis, the Fire Monster, aka. Godzilla Raids Again. This version of Mecha-G is actually built around the bones of the original 1954 Godzilla who was killed by the oxygen destroyer. An unpredicted side-effect: the bones still have psychic affinity with modern Godzilla and occasionally act on their own against the will of the piloting crew! Ah, well, who really cares? Mecha-G looks awesome and is equipped with a devastating arsenal that can match Godzilla in combat, and that's what we came to see.

Now, this might seem like enough to make the movie all it needs. But it gets better! There's a Top-Gun love triangle between the lovable-loser dufus Mecha-G mechanic, his elitist over-new-wave-hairdoed fighter pilot rival, and the hot lady copilot. It also features the greatest romantic dialogue of all time, in which, after the Earth has been warned/threatened by Mothra to respect the spirit of the dead kaiju and not re-activate Mechagodzilla (!), a deep soul searching is conducted between the two leads...in ways which I can describe no further.

I laughed.

I cried (this is a movie with Mothra, and therefore Momma Mothra must DIE...yes, there are baby caterpillars who play an integral role).

OK, I don't want to ruin the whole movie. Suffice to say I enjoyed it a lot.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

This is a movie I loved deeply as a 14 year old, and between Empire/Raiders/Jedi and this, represents the end of a sort of Mecca of Hollywood pop fiction before I got older and more cynical...and more appreciative of David Cronenberg movies.

I suppose this was a developmentally important movie for me, because having never seen Mata Hari, it was my first representation of the Goddess Kali as a worshiped God and not just a mythological Dungeons and Dragons monster from a Sinbad movie. And despite it being a horrendous misrepresentation, it does actually do one thing correctly: captures the awesomeness and reverence Kali inspires, for as it is told in Devi Sukta, we do not worship Devi because religion expects and compels it, we do so because She allows it.

Nevertheless, upon revisiting this movie, I experienced the epic disappointment of completely agreeing with India's reaction to this movie (banning it completely).

It's A. Utterly racist and sacrilegious

Of course, as the crossroads of civilization between the major African exodus, and all other Eastern and Western cultures, it's very convenient to pick Indians as a vaguely-familiar-yet-primitive-enough-to-be-scary ethnic group. What really is racist about this movie is that the colonial British are portrayed as the good guys against these voodoo cultists (a lot of this footage was excised or incomplete, but the white British guy from the palace was also under the "spell" of Kali-Ma until he is freed to summon the good "royal and loyal" Indian militia.

Now these events are meant to be a sort of replaying of the Indian Rebellion of 1857, also referred to as India's First War of Independence against the rule of the British East India Company, in which Indian conscripted soldiers revolted against their colonial (business) commanders, inspiring many other disparate groups to act likewise, including many tribal groups who used the name of Kali as an inspirational cry.

So we have the Thuggee "cult" which was a real enitiy c. 1830 and for 600 years prior, although it was always a sort of Mafia of highwaymen, not a religious group, many who turned to crime because they were starving due to recurring and horrific famines due to inadequate food transportation, distribution, and democratic controls while under the control of the British East India Company. And while they did use the imagery of Kali to inspire fear in the superstitious, the reality is they originated with and were mostly made up of Muslims. The cult of blood-drinking worshippers of the Kali Voodoo Goddess of Death is an (almost) entirely fictitious invention of paranoid Victorian era British psychology.

So with that out of the way, this movie is also:

B. Terribly sexist. Being that Kate Capshaw (aka. Willie) is the only female presence in the movie (besides dancing girl extras and crying village mothers...i.e. stereotypes) other than Kali, and that she is basically the worst sort of trophy wife ("Waaaahhhhh....I broke a nail!") imaginable...I suppose that's what Spielberg was looking for...one can see an absolute contempt for women in this movie.

EXCEPT...beyond that, having a greater appreciation for the Hindu pantheon will let you in on a little secret. Underneath the pretext, there is a pretty funny SUBTEXT, which is that this movie is an actually sort of brilliant SEX COMEDY....and this is the best I can make it out:

When Indiana Jones and cohorts arrive in the ruined Indian village, the elder says how the people from the palace stole the Lingam of Shiva (lit. "They stole God's Penis!"). Now as, the romance develops between Indy and Willy, you can start to see how she represents Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and fortune, accustomed to modern comforts, enamored by diamonds and so forth. Now Kali, of course is the unknown, the enlightenment that lies at the boundaries of life and death, the power cosmic that mocks man's judgement or attempt to control, that drives Indiana Jones' questing. It's especially funny when you realize there's basically a threesome scene when Jones is still under the black spell of Kali and Willie is being lowered into the sacrificial magma pool. But then Short-Round wakes him from his reverie, saying, essentially "the mysteries of the universe can wait until the next life, but for now you've got to rescue this dizzy, ditzy gold-digger and become a respectable home-maker and my surrogate father (at least for this film)."

Well that's about the only silver lining I can glean from this otherwise kind of bad movie. It really doesn't even have much a plot otherwise, and there's virtually no character development for any of the villains, nothing approaching what we got in Raiders. The whole movie is mostly a big long action set piece, i.e. the "Truck Chase" without any interleaved dialogue or story.

LAST BITE: One other enjoyable moment was when I realized this movie is basically an action/fantasy version of Deliverance...i.e. what happens when you land you're raft in backwoods India.

KEEPING IT 100: 3 or 4 times every decade in the rural sticks, some dupes are convinced by tantric charlatans to make a blood sacrifice of some innocent victim to Kali or Chandi, even though this is not in any way sanctioned by Shaktism. However it doesn't come close to the numbers murdered by Jesus kooks in the USA each year!

I do really want to make a reverse-spoof of this movie: Punjabi Kabir and the Forgotten Shrine of the Mormon Empire!

Shalom!
The A-Team (2010) I liked the flying tank vs drones but the rest was crap.

Mythbusters need to test that tank thing.
TOS
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finding dory, with my son (his first movie in a theatre) ... he loved it, so did i

tons of fun, a "pixar is back" kind of situation
TOS
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Metacell posted:
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

This is a movie I loved deeply as a 14 year old, and between Empire/Raiders/Jedi and this, represents the end of a sort of Mecca of Hollywood pop fiction before I got older and more cynical...and more appreciative of David Cronenberg movies.

I suppose this was a developmentally important movie for me, because having never seen Mata Hari, it was my first representation of the Goddess Kali as a worshiped God and not just a mythological Dungeons and Dragons monster from a Sinbad movie. And despite it being a horrendous misrepresentation, it does actually do one thing correctly: captures the awesomeness and reverence Kali inspires, for as it is told in Devi Sukta, we do not worship Devi because religion expects and compels it, we do so because She allows it.

Nevertheless, upon revisiting this movie, I experienced the epic disappointment of completely agreeing with India's reaction to this movie (banning it completely).

It's A. Utterly racist and sacrilegious

Of course, as the crossroads of civilization between the major African exodus, and all other Eastern and Western cultures, it's very convenient to pick Indians as a vaguely-familiar-yet-primitive-enough-to-be-scary ethnic group. What really is racist about this movie is that the colonial British are portrayed as the good guys against these voodoo cultists (a lot of this footage was excised or incomplete, but the white British guy from the palace was also under the "spell" of Kali-Ma until he is freed to summon the good "royal and loyal" Indian militia.

Now these events are meant to be a sort of replaying of the Indian Rebellion of 1857, also referred to as India's First War of Independence against the rule of the British East India Company, in which Indian conscripted soldiers revolted against their colonial (business) commanders, inspiring many other disparate groups to act likewise, including many tribal groups who used the name of Kali as an inspirational cry.

So we have the Thuggee "cult" which was a real enitiy c. 1830 and for 600 years prior, although it was always a sort of Mafia of highwaymen, not a religious group, many who turned to crime because they were starving due to recurring and horrific famines due to inadequate food transportation, distribution, and democratic controls while under the control of the British East India Company. And while they did use the imagery of Kali to inspire fear in the superstitious, the reality is they originated with and were mostly made up of Muslims. The cult of blood-drinking worshippers of the Kali Voodoo Goddess of Death is an (almost) entirely fictitious invention of paranoid Victorian era British psychology.

So with that out of the way, this movie is also:

B. Terribly sexist. Being that Kate Capshaw (aka. Willie) is the only female presence in the movie (besides dancing girl extras and crying village mothers...i.e. stereotypes) other than Kali, and that she is basically the worst sort of trophy wife ("Waaaahhhhh....I broke a nail!") imaginable...I suppose that's what Spielberg was looking for...one can see an absolute contempt for women in this movie.

EXCEPT...beyond that, having a greater appreciation for the Hindu pantheon will let you in on a little secret. Underneath the pretext, there is a pretty funny SUBTEXT, which is that this movie is an actually sort of brilliant SEX COMEDY....and this is the best I can make it out:

When Indiana Jones and cohorts arrive in the ruined Indian village, the elder says how the people from the palace stole the Lingam of Shiva (lit. "They stole God's Penis!"). Now as, the romance develops between Indy and Willy, you can start to see how she represents Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and fortune, accustomed to modern comforts, enamored by diamonds and so forth. Now Kali, of course is the unknown, the enlightenment that lies at the boundaries of life and death, the power cosmic that mocks man's judgement or attempt to control, that drives Indiana Jones' questing. It's especially funny when you realize there's basically a threesome scene when Jones is still under the black spell of Kali and Willie is being lowered into the sacrificial magma pool. But then Short-Round wakes him from his reverie, saying, essentially "the mysteries of the universe can wait until the next life, but for now you've got to rescue this dizzy, ditzy gold-digger and become a respectable home-maker and my surrogate father (at least for this film)."

Well that's about the only silver lining I can glean from this otherwise kind of bad movie. It really doesn't even have much a plot otherwise, and there's virtually no character development for any of the villains, nothing approaching what we got in Raiders. The whole movie is mostly a big long action set piece, i.e. the "Truck Chase" without any interleaved dialogue or story.

LAST BITE: One other enjoyable moment was when I realized this movie is basically an action/fantasy version of Deliverance...i.e. what happens when you land you're raft in backwoods India.

KEEPING IT 100: 3 or 4 times every decade in the rural sticks, some dupes are convinced by tantric charlatans to make a blood sacrifice of some innocent victim to Kali or Chandi, even though this is not in any way sanctioned by Shaktism. However it doesn't come close to the numbers murdered by Jesus kooks in the USA each year!

I do really want to make a reverse-spoof of this movie: Punjabi Kabir and the Forgotten Shrine of the Mormon Empire!

Shalom!


temple of doom was a disgrace ... i can't imagine what spielberg was thinking for chrissakes

though it's where he met future wife kate capshaw so i guess it wasn't a total loss (they're still married)
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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It's the movie that gave us PG-13.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Ant-Man

It's ok.

The best from it is the mexican guy and the Stan Lee cameo. And I won't complain about Evangeline Lilly.

Seriously, not bad, just not great, IMHO.
Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974) In honour of Cimino's death but I don't get the appeal of the movie. Barbara Bach got some prime billing? For what?
Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Ribtor posted:
Barbara Bach got some prime billing? For what?

Her tits.
X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) I can't square that film off with Deadpool. I must have missed something.
dv
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Ribtor posted:
X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) I can't square that film off with Deadpool. I must have missed something.

That movie didn't happen.
The Downfall (2004) Acting doesn't get much better.
I remember interviews with Traudl Junge in BBC's "The World At War" and you could see then her personal sense of guilt was palpable.
Car movie weekend:

The Driver (1978): A man of few words getaway driver tries to avoid a detective who is so hell-bent on catching him that he sets up a deal with crooks to rob a bank and catch the driver in the act. The heist goes wrong and everyone gets shot up. It's kind of like Bullitt but with more car chases. I can't get over how horrible cars handled back then, they're all flopping around in the corners.

Drive (2011): I thought this was a remake of The Driver, but it's not although the protagonist is another getaway driver of few words. His neighbor's husband gets out of prison but owes the mob money so he helps out on a heist that goes wrong. Now the mob is after him and he has to kick some heads in (this literally happens once). I didn't expect it to be as bloody, but it's filmed nicely in a noir style with an 1980s-like soundtrack.
Séamas Honorary Consul General
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The Sting
I liked it a lot, but the reveal of there long con was a bit underwhelming. It also looked like it would have cost free to pull off than the actual take.
The use of Joplin throughout made just about every kid my age who took piano lessons learn to play "the Entertainer" at some point. I love Joplin's music, but thought it didn't fit the period very well. It'd been kind of cool if they placed the story 25 years earlier or so.

Into the Wild
I had to stop watching got. I know basically how it turns out and just didn't have much sympathy for the main character.


Batman (the Movie)
So bad it is good. I wish it had Julie Newmar instead of Lee Meriwether. Still the best batman movie with the best batmobile ever. And best use of shark repellant bat spray in any movie ever.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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10 Cloverfield Lane

:up:

By the way, went to read the wiki after watching the movie. They should have a spoiler warning because it tells you EVERYTHING that happens instead of just what it is about. So avoid wikipedia before watching movies.

Last edited by ukimalefu on Mon Jul 11, 2016 3:44 pm.

Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Zootopia. So good we watched it twice!
dv
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Finally started season 6 of Downton Abbey.

The first episode was amazing, mostly because it was the first time pretty much everybody was honest with each other and everything worked out for the better in the end as a result.

I'm scared.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Into The Woods. Hated it, but to be fair, i couldn't make it past the 12 minute mark.
Cool hand Luke (1967) George Kennedy and Wayne Rogers had the bulk of the dialogue. I think the opening scene of cutting the heads off the parking meters and the car-wash girl stand out more than the Captain's famous line. But there's a lot to like.

To me, that film and Gengarry Glen Ross are the ultimate guy movies. Deperation, rebellion or failure; these are life's choices.
Blood Simple (1984) Even with some "boring bits" removed, the movie was not as I recalled. I found it uninteresting and didn't bother finishing. I remembered it being much better.

Contes Immoraux (1974) Supposed to be an erotic anthology. Has Paloma Picasso as Elizabeth Báthory. This film may have ended the director's 'serious' career.
dv
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http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2544766/

Was an interesting story. Even if my idiot american brain recoiled at the prospect of reading a movie.
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The Gift (2015)

Good movie. Worth seeing.
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