What was the last movie you saw?

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j_tso posted:
The Hustler (1961)

Paul Newman plays a pool hustler that gets too caught up in trying to break another big time hustler. It was on TCM. And I found out the that's where the Fast Eddie's chain got its name.


love that movie

newman versus gleason, all time classic scenes
juice Inadvertently correct
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ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Charade (1963) Rock Hudson and Audrey Hepburn (damn, she's pretty). Great movie! It's been called "the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made," and it lives up to it. Also featuring George Kennedy, Walter Matthau, and a rather young looking James Coburn. On Netflix streaming and definitely worth the 1:53.
Pithecanthropus posted:
Charade (1963) Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn (damn, she's pretty). Great movie!


FTFY

I love that movie too. It's got wit and excitement as well as a jazzy soundtrack by Mancini.
Casino Royale (2006) Like the 1967 version this one also lacks humour. But it works and Mr Craig was a fine choice for the direction Eon Studios took for the series.
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j_tso posted:
Pithecanthropus posted:
Charade (1963) Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn (damn, she's pretty). Great movie!


FTFY

I love that movie too. It's got wit and excitement as well as a jazzy soundtrack by Mancini.

Oops! :heh:
That's what I get for posting before I finish my first cup of coffee.
"Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief" (2015).

Likely what you know of Scientology is, at best, incomplete. Sure, you know about Xenu and the entire prehistory from Scientology which is briefly covered in this documentary, but what you probably don't know about is exploitative nature of the church.

Most of the doc consists of interviews with people who have left the church (when the makers are done with that interviewee they show a graphic saying "X left the church in <year Y>") so it is undoubtedly biased. There is some archive footage of followers like Tom Cruise and John Travolta, but my guess is that the makers did not bother to try (at least too hard) to get Q&A interviews with them or the current leader, David Miscavage, given the litigious nature of the church.

While the basic tenants of Scientology pooh-poohs psychology in general, what much of Scientology deals with is people attempting to go "clear". In order to do this, that person must reveal their own inner demons to a church official who watches a church's "e-meter" to see that during this revelation (and its repeats) that the revealer's reactions to these memories gradually diminishes while at the same time the official takes notes which are filed away in the church's library. In some cases--especially for celebrities--these attempts to go clear are also recorded. Now, regardless of one may think of the act of Catholic confession, one thing that is assumed that the Roman Catholic Church would never use a confession against the confessor. This library is part of why Scientology maintains a tight control over its members.

(To be sure: the church's beliefs include a form of reincarnation so that one must become clear for one's memories in one's past lives. While these may be a limited use in term of keeping control of members, they are useful monetarily because no matter how far back one might go there are always further past lives to "clear").

There is a lot more information like how Tom Cruise enjoys the exploitation that Scientology grants him. He expressed the idea that he wanted to married in a garden to Nicole Kidman, so in the desert compound that the church maintains Miscavage ordered that a garden be created (and torn down to be rebuilt again because Miscavage didn't like the first garden). It may be that Cruise is deluded in believing that these church members are donating their time for the benefit of the church, but he must know that he does get a lot of things for free (or at least for the above cost of becoming clear).

Recommended, especially if one wants an understanding of the Church of Scientology.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.
Vulture 420
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Saw that Scientology doc,it was disturbing. The disturbing part is all after Hubbard died and Muscavige took over. It left me wondering if the human lust for power and money leads to common sociopathic behavior on large scales like this and small scales just to hide truths for the belief that something most precious is being protected, more precious than life itself that is not considered equal to the lives of those wielding the power.

Also, saw the movie 42, about Jackie Robinson. The simple historical subject matter left me with very complicated feelings about being alone in doing what ends up changing an outdated world, also an oversimplified way of describing what it was like to be Jackie Robinson in the game of baseball.
Metacell posted:
I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.

There are lots of versions of this "story". In trying to find the quote below I saw versions with Robert Heinlein and Ursula K. LeGuin instead of Robert Anton Wilson.

Harlan Ellison claims that he was at the conversation at one of the earliest SF conventions in 1949 a SF club meeting in 1950:
Quote:
Wings: [LRH] is also supposed to have said on that same night: "The question is not how to make a million dollars, but how to keep it."

Ellison: Right. And somebody said, "why don't you invent a new religion?

They're always big." We were clowning! You know, "Become Elmer Gantry!

You'll make a fortune!" He says, "I'm going to do it." Sat down, stole a little bit from Freud, stole a little bit from Jung, a little bit from Alder, a little bit of encounter therapy, pre-Janov Primal Screaming, took all that blatherskite, threw it all together, invented a few new words, because he was a science fiction writer, you know, "engrams" and "regression", all that blatherskite. And then he conned John Campbell, who was crazy as a thousand battlefields. I mean, he believed any goddamned thing. He really believed blacks were inferior. I mean he really believed that. He was also very nervous when I was in his office because I was a Jew. You know, he was afraid maybe I would spring horns or something.
[odd paragraph breaks included]

but he has no way of backing that up. Everyone else that he recalled who was there died before he said the above in 2001 1978 in this interview and, of course, this is his recollection of an event from a half- quarter-century earlier.

This article points out that LRH appears to have stated variations of "wanting to start a religion" many times previous to publishing Dianetics in 1950.
user Stupid cockwomble
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I always figured he got drunk in a bar one night and someone called on him the next day, willing to pay and wanting to know more.
Vulture 420
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Metacell posted:
I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.

The hard part is in no way inventing your own religion, but to obtain tax exemption. That was done eventually through legal posturing, and I think after Hubbard was already dead.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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Vulture posted:
Metacell posted:
I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.

The hard part is in no way inventing your own religion, but to obtain tax exemption. That was done eventually through legal posturing, and I think after Hubbard was already dead.


How hard can it be?

I'm your God now. Praise me, by sending me money.

There. If you don't believe in me you won't be saved from eternal damnation.
user Stupid cockwomble
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user Stupid cockwomble
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The Day The Earth Stood Still

Both the original and the Most Excellent one. I saw the original at a Moog Theremin festival in 2005 because it featured Hoffman's theremin playing throughout. One of the participants got Lydia Kavina (Theremin's niece) to say "Klaatu barada nikto".

Also fun seeing "Aunt Bee" sitting at the breakfast table.
ukimalefu posted:
Vulture posted:
Metacell posted:
I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.

The hard part is in no way inventing your own religion, but to obtain tax exemption. That was done eventually through legal posturing, and I think after Hubbard was already dead.


How hard can it be?

I'm your God now. Praise me, by sending me money.

There. If you don't believe in me you won't be saved from eternal damnation.

The central section of "Going Clear" dealt with LRH's and then--after he died--Scientology's problems with the IRS. Part of the price with having a religion is that at least some of the money should go to the benefit of the community instead of a few people's pockets.
ukimalefu want, but shouldn't, may anyway
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License to Kill (1989) I wish Dalton would have been in better movies. I don't understand the positive reviews of this one. Some outrageous stunts though.
The Man Who Never Was (1956)
Fine film that is remarkably true to detail of Operation Mincemeat, the British plan to deceive the Axis into believing that the Allies were going to invade Greece rather than Sicily. They dressed up the corpse of a man who died of Pneumonia in Britain as a Major carrying (false) secret papers and placed the body off the coast of Spain where the Germans were sure to get a hold of it. Film is a bit padded out with an unnecessary romance. Well worth a look.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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ukimalefu posted:
Vulture posted:
Metacell posted:
I understand. L. Ron Hubbard, a writer of science fiction, westerns, and pulp crime novels, made a bet in a bar with Robert Anton Wilson that he could make a million dollars inventing his own religion.

The hard part is in no way inventing your own religion, but to obtain tax exemption. That was done eventually through legal posturing, and I think after Hubbard was already dead.


How hard can it be?

I'm your God now. Praise me, by sending me money.

There. If you don't believe in me you won't be saved from eternal damnation.


If you were geesie I'd have the cheque written. You being Uki, I figure the money is just going to gizmodo.
Metacell Chocolate Brahma
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Atari: Game Over, part of the Signal to Noise documentary series on the video game industry, relating the history of the Atari heyday centered around the urban legend of the mass burial of E.T. cartridges in the New Mexico desert and the 2014 excavation of the suspected burial site.

So much nostalgia for everything that made the 70's and 80's simultaneously the greatest and worst decades of all time. I've never laughed or cried so much at anything so stupid. Amazing.
Hancock (2008) OK. The only superhero movie among the few I have seen that I have been able to tolerate.
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Pithecanthropus Roast Master
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Ribtor posted:
Hancock (2008) OK. The only superhero movie among the few I have seen that I have been able to tolerate.

Really? I enjoyed it, but I thought it lacked a bit. Or maybe it's the fact that Will Smith plays Will Smith in every movie he's in.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I liked Hancock, too.

I watched Shallow Hal the other night, and i've always loved it and thought it was hilarious. This time was different, though. I almost cringed at some of the things he and his friend said or did.
Edge of Tomorrow (2014) Took me a while to figure out what I was watching but once I did I quite enjoyed it. Massive plot holes but given the subject it's hardly an issue. When did Ms Blunt get so physical? Mr Cruise delivers his usual stuff.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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X-Men, Days of Future Past
Man, the 70's were SO awesome! (I wish I could remember 'em ...)
user Stupid cockwomble
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Cynically, it looks like an attempt to keep the younger cast going - but it is a good movie.
Goldfinger (1964) One of the best Bond Villains. So calm and so fat. And kitty Galore.

Thunderball (1965) The only Bond Villain that scared me when I was a kid. I prefer the '83 remake with Barbara Carrera though.

The villains in both original movies had to have most of their lines dubbed. Great theme songs by Bassey and Jones.
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Contact (it's on HBO right now).

Watching the credits go by and there's listed a digital effects firm in New Zealand. Double column of names....and Peter Jackson.
You Only Live Twice (1967) My dad flew with the pilot and maker of the autogyro Bond used to fight off the bad guys.

But there's a problem; Henderson gives Bond a Vodka Martini, stirred not shaken, and asks Bond if that's all right, and Bond says it's excellent. Henderson does get a knife in the back, (justice?) but still...
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I'd watched that one not long ago, and I'd been meaning to comment on how it was the basis for many of the spy movie tropes and stereotypes, especially the ones used by Mike Myers in the Austin Powers movies.
The private army. The hollowed-out volcano. The, "In Japan, the man comes first, and the woman comes second" line.

How the hell could you hollow out a volcano without anybody noticing?

Quote:
My dad flew with the pilot and maker of the autogyro Bond used ...


iirc, he passed away just a couple of years ago. I remember reading an article about him in Popular Science or Mechanics when I was a kid and the movie was new. Can't remember his name, tho.
user Stupid cockwomble
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The volcano hollows itself out.
DukeofNuke posted:

Quote:
My dad flew with the pilot and maker of the autogyro Bond used ...


iirc, he passed away just a couple of years ago. I remember reading an article about him in Popular Science or Mechanics when I was a kid and the movie was new. Can't remember his name, tho.


Wallace. He was the nephew of Barnes Wallace who designed the bouncing bombs. He invited us to his mansion and we got to see the autogyro used in the film as well as others he was building. He took my dad for a flight in a two seater. The man was a hoarder and there was trash everywhere.
jkahless Custom Title
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Ribtor posted:
You Only Live Twice (1967) My dad flew with the pilot and maker of the autogyro Bond used to fight off the bad guys.

But there's a problem; Henderson gives Bond a Vodka Martini, stirred not shaken, and asks Bond if that's all right, and Bond says it's excellent. Henderson does get a knife in the back, (justice?) but still...


Considering how many cigarettes Bond smoked, I hardly think he'd be able to tell. :p
The fighter (2010) A True story. Mr Bale is quite the chameleon. I don't care for boxing but I like boxing movies and this one delivers on many levels. Wahlberg claims to have trained for four years in preparation for this film.
user Stupid cockwomble
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Yeah, he trained in prison.
On Her majesty's Secret Service (1969) Not the worst Bond film. Lazenby was no actor. Telly Savalas as Blofeld? I liked Diana Rigg as Countess Teresa.
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Are you going through these chronologically, or are they playing on TNT or something?
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What was the last movie you saw?

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