Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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I recently finished Anne McCaffrey's Catalyst: A Tale of the Barque Cat and am about to move on the second book Catacombs.
user Stupid cockwomble
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Reading Ender's Game again after many many years and am finding new relevance in the Giant game Ender was playing on his tablet. It was written in 1977 and the descriptions of the game remind me very much of FPSs that I've been playing.

Amazing.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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user wrote:
Reading Ender's Game again after many many years and am finding new relevance in the Giant game Ender was playing on his tablet. It was written in 1977 and the descriptions of the game remind me very much of FPSs that I've been playing.

Amazing.


Don't read the newest book in the series and don't read the empire series. Card went full retard.
user Stupid cockwomble
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mmaverick wrote:
user wrote:
Reading Ender's Game again after many many years and am finding new relevance in the Giant game Ender was playing on his tablet. It was written in 1977 and the descriptions of the game remind me very much of FPSs that I've been playing.

Amazing.


Don't read the newest book in the series and don't read the empire series. Card went full retard.

Yeah, I dropped Card after he seemed to decide to focus on portraying Mormonism. It's a shame - he's a local hero (he referenced NC localities in his stories, including his hometown of Greensboro - about thirty miles from me).

There was a late Ender series book about a smart monkey that he co-wrote with someone. It was pretty good, but I'm not sure if he ever continued that direction.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke wrote:
A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.

Too bad there isn't a Kindle edition. :/
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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justine wrote:
DukeofNuke wrote:
A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.

Too bad there isn't a Kindle edition. :/

Agreed.
I had been in that house so many times; I would go by at least once a week.
Of course, we all kind of drifted apart after high school, but I would still run into Tammy now and then.
I remember well waking up to the news on the radio.
In a town of 700, a gruesome murder like that was like an attack on everyone.
sturner Ancient Soldier
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Rangers at Dieppe
The first combat actin of the U.S. Army Rangers in WWII.

You Canadians thought you were the only ones forgotten at Dieppe, but you weren't.
I am making my way through the Reacher books, by Lee Child. He needed to step in and say "Tom Cruise? WTF? Reacher is 6'5" not 5'6"!
J.K. Rowling's A Casual Vacancy

Basically it is the soap-operatic goings-on in and around a small English town in the West Country taking place over about 3 weeks. The entitled "casual vacancy" is the open city council seat due to the death by a brain aneurysm of a city councilman that happens in the opening chapter. The city council has been embroiled over the disposition of the Fields, a district that we in the US might call "the projects" and the open seat threatens to break the balance between those who support the Fields and those who would cut it off to be taken over by a larger nearby town through redistricting.

Having read the Harry Potter series I was rather surprised by the shifting of points-of-view that happen throughout the book. The entirety is told from first person but there aren't any breaks in the text to indicate that the POV has changed from one person to another, and sometimes this happens in the middle of a conversation between two of the characters. It is only by context that the reader finds that the narrative has shifted. There is no leading character in the book--the narration is spread between about 20 characters with 10-15 relatively minor ones.

The book also uses a considerable amount of English idiom and while nearly all were only small puzzles for this American to figure out what was meant from context, they were somewhat bothersome.

Overall I have to say that it was a depressing story. There is no insight that the reader gets from having read the book except that the people in this town are no different from you or me, pre-occupied with their petty jealousies and rivalries. I have to say "thumbs down" unless you have some peculiar reasons for reading "A Casual Vacancy".
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Thanks for that critique DEyncourt. I wasn't sure i wanted to read it. Now i'm pretty sure i don't.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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I've got this fantastic fantasy oven going right now...
The Extinction Club by Jeffrey Moore


Quite good. He makes some interesting observations about Quebec.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I'm about 3/4 of the way through Game of Thrones (Ned is in the dungeon).
I've watched the whole series on TV, and I think I'm enjoying the book better for it.
The fifth book arrived last week. I'll have to go back and re-read the last few pages (maybe the last couple of chapters) of book four to figure out where I'm at in the story but I'm looking forward to getting back into it.
rjprice wrote:
The fifth book arrived last week. I'll have to go back and re-read the last few pages (maybe the last couple of chapters) of book four to figure out where I'm at in the story but I'm looking forward to getting back into it.

You may not have to backtrack. A Dance With Dragons (book 5) begins chronologically about at the same time that A Feast of Crows (book 4) starts and thus the first part of the latter book overlaps the earlier one, then after some point the story continues forward on all fronts.

Part of the delay for the publication of Feast was that while Martin was writing it he had gotten to about 1500 pages and saw that he wasn't close to finishing what he wanted for that book. He decided to separate part of the story into Dance, but this necessitated a substantial re-edit of what he already had written for Feast in order to remove references that wouldn't make sense with the omission of the parts that became the first portion of Dance.
Leonard Susskind's "The Black Hole War: My Battle With Stephen Hawking To make The World Safe For Quantum Mechanics"
Redshirts by John Scalzi After reading this book the only question you will have is, "Who will play me in the movie?" My list is down to Max Grodénchik, Armin Shimerman, Balthazar Getty, Christopher Lambert, Tucker Smallwood, and Chris Tucker.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I haven't felt much like reading lately, but i'm going to be starting Dante's Inferno.
user Stupid cockwomble
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I've got a full set of Lord of the Rings paperbacks staring at me from my bookshelf.

I'll start them after I'm through with Ian Fleming.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Just started Clash of Kings
justine wrote:
I haven't felt much like reading lately, but i'm going to be starting Dante's Inferno.

If you like that long hair stuff, then maybe tryThucydides? As a mental exercise the experience is kind of like eating wool, if baking soda were the only available condiment.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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rjprice wrote:
justine wrote:
I haven't felt much like reading lately, but i'm going to be starting Dante's Inferno.

If you like that lon hair stuff, then maybe tryThucydides? As a mental exercise the experience is kind of like eating wool, if baking soda were the only available condiment.


I think justine is referring to the new Dan Brown book.

Image

but, maybe not ... :shrug:
I had not considered that, Duke I feel bad for you having done so.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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The Divine Comedy really should be read as a whole.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I was referring to Dante's Inferno by Dante Alighieri.

Geesie, since this is the first of 3 (?) i should continue on after?
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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just finished up haldeman's marsbound trilogy. it was a fun read but it's pacing was a little off.
Geesie wrote:
The Divine Comedy really should be read as a whole.

And in the original Italian? :)

Somewhere I have an old copy of the Divine Comedy that my uncle--who died when I was still an infant so I have no memory of him--got in the 1950's. It had the advantage of being illustrated with all of the Gustave Doré engravings like:

Image

Being a translation into English it did suffer from being written in blank verse which attempted to replicate the verse scheme that Dante used, so the language was very stilted. It also had the problem of being very lightly footnoted which meant that there was not very much to identify various people mentioned in the text and why they were in the circumstances they were in. Personally I only got through Inferno in this book, but on the other hand I do have a tin ear for poetry.

justine, I suggest looking for a heavily annotated version of either Inferno or the Divine Comedy if you haven't picked it up yet. While with Internet resources you can easily run down a reference to Pope So-and-so to learn the reasons why Dante puts him into this particular circle of Hell, having such references accompanying the text makes reading easier.

My understanding is that of the 3 parts Inferno is the most interesting, Purgatorio is not quite so interesting, and Paradiso is rather boring especially if you're not inclined towards Christian theology in general or that of 14th century Italy in particular.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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justine wrote:
I was referring to Dante's Inferno by Dante Alighieri.

Geesie, since this is the first of 3 (?) i should continue on after?


I bow to you, Madam, and beg forgiveness for any offense I may have inadvertently bestowed by suggesting that you were, perhaps, pursuing a work of vulgar popular fiction, rather than an intectual tome of such cultural and historic significance.
My hat off to you.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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From the reviews it got, the version (kindle) i got had the best reviews for the translation. The only poor review it got was that it isn't annotated. Do you think i'll have a lot of trouble with it not being annotated, but being a good translation?

LOL Duke. I have plenty of trash to read. I just decided i wanted to read this. :)
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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justine wrote:
I was referring to Dante's Inferno by Dante Alighieri.

Geesie, since this is the first of 3 (?) i should continue on after?


Well certainly see how you take to the poetry style first, of course.

While many consider the Inferno section to be the most "interesting" I think that taking it out of the context of the whole work misses a lot. The three sections are structured the same so you get the vices of Inferno directly contrasted with the virtues of Paradisio, and between them is Purgatorio with the attempts to shed the vices and embrace the virtues.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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justine posted:
DukeofNuke wrote:
A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.

Too bad there isn't a Kindle edition. :/


There is now.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I just finished A Dance with Dragons, so I'm caught up on the Ice and Fire series.
And I'm like ... "THE fiddlesticks!"
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke posted:
justine posted:
DukeofNuke wrote:
A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.

Too bad there isn't a Kindle edition. :/


There is now.

Thanks. I think i'll get it.
blurt mundus vult decipi
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Isaac's Storm by Erik Larson. I read Thunderstruck and I love his style. Half science, half humanity. My only complaint is that he tries too hard to touch our senses, with deep descriptions of smells, sounds, and sights. In a way, I appreciate it, because it imparts a cinematic feel. If you get into it, you can really picture the moment. Unfortunately, I see him trying too hard, and it's distracting. But it's a minor quibble. Read him; you'll learn.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke posted:
justine posted:
DukeofNuke wrote:
A Dark and Bloody Ground. by Darcy O'Brien.

It's a true story about the murder of a friend of mine.

Too bad there isn't a Kindle edition. :/


There is now.

So, I started it. I'm reading all the background stuff. I'm going to send you a PM one of these days about it. :)
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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So, if anyone is interested in True Crime at all, i recommend the book Duke posted.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Just another FYI about A Dark And Bloody Ground. Real good book and actually made me want to learn more about Eastern Kentucky, so i downloaded a book that was also recommended.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I haven't started the new book i downloaded. I figured i'd go with a something a little lighter right now, so i'm reading Just After Sunset by Stephen King. It's a collection of short stories, and i already wish one of them had been made into a movie.
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Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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