Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I still don't understand why you feel it's necessary to remove the RFID at all.
DukeofNuke wrote:
I still don't understand why you feel it's necessary to remove the RFID at all.

It's not part of the book.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?
chikie The same deviled egg
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justine wrote:
Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?

To keep people from walking off with them?
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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chikie wrote:
justine wrote:
Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?

To keep people from walking off with them?

But random books? I mean, book prices are generally the same. Except for some pricier books like coffee table/art/the arts type books, and of course collectibles, what's the point? Almost all books run between $3-$30. Is there really a problem with book theft? I would think a bigger problem would be the sitting areas where you can drink coffee and read your book or magazine, and not buying it.
justine wrote:
chikie wrote:
justine wrote:
Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?

To keep people from walking off with them?

But random books? I mean, book prices are generally the same. Except for some pricier books like coffee table/art/the arts type books, and of course collectibles, what's the point? Almost all books run between $3-$30. Is there really a problem with book theft? I would think a bigger problem would be the sitting areas where you can drink coffee and read your book or magazine, and not buying it.

Let me point out that EVERY copy of that Pratchett/Baxter book had that annoyingly stuck RFID so it wasn't a random selection.

I think that RFIDs are used primarily for inventory tracking and--at least up to this case--secondarily for shoplifting control. As it happened last night I finished reading another hardcover book (also picked up from B&N) and when I flipped the last page I found an RFID tucked in between the last two pages. Unlike the problematic and damaging RFID in the Pratchett book it was stuck with something like a Post-It Note's glue and was easily removed. This book was recently published, two weeks before the Long Earth. Perhaps the RFID that seemed more designed more as an anti-theft device is a reflection of the popularity of Pratchett? If not, I will take books up to the help desk inside my local B&N store to point out that here is another lost sale due to a badly designed RFID (at least until I stop browsing/shopping there).
I oppose the unnecessary removal if parts from books.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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So, was the first RFID hidden ? like, buried within the cover bindings with only a outline visible to show you it was there ?

To each his own, of course; but I remain a little concerned by your vehement dislike of such an innocuous attachment; and wonder if you will soon be taking a sharpie to the white lines in bar codes.
DukeofNuke wrote:
So, was the first RFID hidden ? like, buried within the cover bindings with only a outline visible to show you it was there ?
[snip]

No, I was quite explicit: stuck on the inside of the back cover of the book. About 1.5 inches square with white cover on the RFID against the white binding of the book, but I'm sure that was only a coincidence. The other RFID that I mentioned was also white and was stuck to the golden-yellow endsheet of that book.
justine wrote:
chikie wrote:
justine wrote:
Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?

To keep people from walking off with them?

But random books? I mean, book prices are generally the same. Except for some pricier books like coffee table/art/the arts type books, and of course collectibles, what's the point? Almost all books run between $3-$30. Is there really a problem with book theft? I would think a bigger problem would be the sitting areas where you can drink coffee and read your book or magazine, and not buying it.

To do that people have to go to the store, which takes time and then sit and read which takes time, so is not that efficient. Plus, they might end up buying a coffee while there, so the business will still make a profit. Plus, even of they ultimately don't buy the book, it's still there for someone else to buy it. Whereas, if someone takes it the store is out the cost of replacing the book.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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jr565 wrote:
justine wrote:
chikie wrote:
justine wrote:
Why would they put RFIDs in books at all?

To keep people from walking off with them?

But random books? I mean, book prices are generally the same. Except for some pricier books like coffee table/art/the arts type books, and of course collectibles, what's the point? Almost all books run between $3-$30. Is there really a problem with book theft? I would think a bigger problem would be the sitting areas where you can drink coffee and read your book or magazine, and not buying it.

To do that people have to go to the store, which takes time and then sit and read which takes time, so is not that efficient. Plus, they might end up buying a coffee while there, so the business will still make a profit. Plus, even of they ultimately don't buy the book, it's still there for someone else to buy it. Whereas, if someone takes it the store is out the cost of replacing the book.


People already do it. I see it every time i go, and trust me, i will not spend money on a book or magazine that looks like it's already been read. Most people won't. So, they're still going to be out the cost of the book.
Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949

Very interesting read. I'm a fan of the author.
I've come across two more RFIDs.

The first was discovered while I was reading the book. It was the standard blank 1.5-inch square, although stuck in the middle of the book covering some of the text. Fortunately this one had glue which was similar to but a bit tougher than the glue used on standard Post-It Notes--I had to work on a corner for a bit but once I had that lifted up the rest came off easily and left no residue.

The second is still stuck on the inside back cover of a trade paperback. If anything it seems tougher to remove than the one I described in my first post on RFIDs but the difference may be not having a solid cover from which to pull in this case. I have about a third of it lifted off, but there is still glue stuck to the inside cover under that part I've lifted off so even if I manage to remove all of the RFID I'll be left with a sticky inside cover. I'm returning this book tomorrow after work.

BTW: all of these books with RFIDs in them were from Barnes & Noble.
This RFID policy they're running don't seem so smart as it is implicitly stating how little they trust people not to steal their stuff and seems to cause great damage to books to try and remove them even if you've brought it so you're treated as a criminal nonetheless and have a defaced book as a result of trying to remove this unnecessary device.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Moby Dick

It's a free Kindle download.

I am SO glad I wasn't forced to read this in high school. What amazing writing.

"It's better to sleep with a sober cannibal, than a drunken Christian."

Awesome !
DEyncourt wrote:
I've come across two more RFIDs.

The first was discovered while I was reading the book. It was the standard blank 1.5-inch square, although stuck in the middle of the book covering some of the text. Fortunately this one had glue which was similar to but a bit tougher than the glue used on standard Post-It Notes--I had to work on a corner for a bit but once I had that lifted up the rest came off easily and left no residue.

The second is still stuck on the inside back cover of a trade paperback. If anything it seems tougher to remove than the one I described in my first post on RFIDs but the difference may be not having a solid cover from which to pull in this case. I have about a third of it lifted off, but there is still glue stuck to the inside cover under that part I've lifted off so even if I manage to remove all of the RFID I'll be left with a sticky inside cover. I'm returning this book tomorrow after work.

BTW: all of these books with RFIDs in them were from Barnes & Noble.

A follow-up:

I did return that book without any problems.

I have since browsed through my local Barnes & Noble and found that ALL of the books that I've referred to in these complaints no longer have any RFIDs in them: not the problematic sticky ones, not those with Post-It Note-like glue. Perhaps there are smaller RFIDs that weren't so easily noticed while I riffled through them.

Unfortunately for B&N I have gotten my order from Amazon (with no RFIDs).

-----

Right now I'm in the middle of Prachett/Baxter's The Long Earth and I'm not particularly happy with it. I get the feeling that it is more Baxter's work than Prachett's. There was one chapter involving the Australian Aborigines which I thought was more-or-less purely Pratchett but much of the rest doesn't sing to me like his other books. It's not a horrible read and I will finish it because it plays with an interesting idea--basically a simple device enables most people to step from one Earth to another which is slightly different from ours EXCEPT that there are no humans in them, and there may be an infinity of alternate Earths--but it wasn't quite what I was hoping for.
2010: Odyssey 2
Year Zero by Rob Reid.

First, you should take a look at Rob Reid's contribution to this year's w00tstock 4.0 which was partially concurrent with Comic Con in San Diego (actually, I can recommend watching all sixteen parts of w00tstock 4.0 though collectively they are about 4 hours of weirdness and amusement). In his segment Reid talks about copyright math and a bit about his new book. Near the end he notes that his publisher had printed a pamphlet which had the first three chapters but was missing the prologue which sets up his story, so he put a copy of the prologue at this site where you can read it.

Normally I would wait until I finish a book to make any recommendation--I'm about halfway through--but if you like the prologue I'm pretty sure that you will like the book. It is basically a fish-out-of-water book a la Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, and it has been similarly amusing to me so that the ending probably won't much matter.
Shnicky-Poo wrote:
Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949

Very interesting read. I'm a fan of the author.


I am slowly working on his D-Day book. Loved the Anecdote about Hemingway accusing Capa of trying to get him killed so he can get the first photos of the dead writer. :D
Redshirts by John Scalzi.

Actually I will recommend that you should read everything written by Scalzi with the caution that the Old Man's War series should be read in publishing date order (so Old Man's War, The Ghost Brigade, The Last Colony, then Zoe's Tale). While sometimes amusing, all of Scalzi books have thoughtful themes.

In Redshirts the conceit is that in the future humanity has become one of several space-faring species which is exploring the galaxy but on Earth's flagship part of the crew has become aware of the appalling rate that certain types of crewmembers are killed or injured through misadventure on planets or exploding instrument panels or such. While most of the crew has become cowed and content to let new crew take the brunt of deaths and injuries, one new crewmember figures out that he CAN do something about it but he will need some help....

While there is a w00tstock 4.0 segment where Scalzi and fellow author Patrick Rothfuss read a segment from Redshirts, instead you should watch this video with the same passage as read by Scalzi and Wil Wheaton, especially for one particular section dealing with a certain "child, barely post-pubescent".
3001: The Final Odyssey
Warin wrote:
Shnicky-Poo wrote:
Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949

Very interesting read. I'm a fan of the author.


I am slowly working on his D-Day book. Loved the Anecdote about Hemingway accusing Capa of trying to get him killed so he can get the first photos of the dead writer. :D


Oh man yeah, that book is great.

His books on Satalingrad and the Battle of Berlin were also magnificent.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe by J. Randy Taraborelli

It is so completely depressing. Not just because of what she went thru as a child, but also because of the way things were in general when she was a child.
ScifiterX wrote:
3001: The Final Odyssey

Good but very anticlimactic
Agent Garbo: The Brilliant, Eccentric Secret Agent Who Tricked Hitler and Saved D-Day by Stephan Talty.

This is a biography of Juan Pujol, a man of whom you probably never heard anything about before reading this book, but the subtitle is quite serious in assessing his value to the Allies in WWII. To be sure there were many people in the British and American intelligence agencies who backed and directed Pujol in his efforts to fool Hitler and the German High Command, it cannot be doubted that Pujol played a key role in delaying the Nazi response to the invasion of Normandy.

What is odd is that beyond his adventures during WWII as Agent Garbo, Pujol was a sort of average guy with high dreams which never panned out. During the Spanish Civil War he was jailed by both sides as a deserter--Pujol was a pacifist who hated that Spain was tearing itself apart--but through luck and the help of relatives managed to avoid being executed. Following WWII despite being given substantial rewards by the British Pujol lost much of it due to bad luck, timing and circumstances.

As Agent Garbo, Pujol performed the high-wire act of cajoling the German spies in Spain to take him on as a secret agent infiltrating Great Britain AND THEN persuaded the British spies in Spain that what he really wanted to do was serve the Allies as a double agent. For several months Pujol was stuck in Spain and Portugal filing reports on a country which he had never visited to the Germans, culling details from newspapers and magazines then spinning them into tales which captured the interest of the German High Command. After Pujol approached and was turned down by the British spies several times, one of their agents in Spain figured out that Pujol was the agent who was sending the Germans these highly detailed (though not particularly useful) reports, and only then the British whisked Pujol off to the UK.

One of Agent Garbo's near-coups for the Germans was the detailed report of the Allies invasion of North Africa through Casablanca. After filing report after report which gave the impression that the Allies would be landing somewhere cold--Hitler had a particular fear that Norway would be one point of invasion--Garbo shifted his reports so that somewhere warmer was likely the destination (though Hitler had already committed about 150,000 extra troops to Norway). In a report that was mailed several days BEFORE the North African invasion Garbo had almost all of its details including the date, BUT his message was delayed by British censors so that it got to Garbo contacts in Spain the day AFTER that invasion started. As a result Garbo was paid the high compliment by being sent one of the few radio sets used in the German spy network.

For what Pujol/Garbo did for D-Day, I'll have you read Talty's book because he does so in a very engaging way and there are too many details for a short report like this.
A truly amazing story. Deserves far more attention than it gets.
sturner Ancient Soldier
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Working my way, slowly though the entire Valdemar series of books by Mercedes Lackey.
The Runaways, by Victor Canning.

A novel I had to read in the first Form at school (grade 6?).
Sometimes I had to read passages from it aloud and my accent amused the class. Bastards.

Great descriptive prose. I remember actually enjoying it when I had to read it and now revisiting it, I know why.


I guess I must have swiped it from the school, because I still have it.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I finally finished the MM book. It was slow going because it was so sad and depressing. Having said that, it was also really interesting and quite enlightening.
user Stupid cockwomble
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Pirate Latitudes by Michael Crichton

Amazing that this completed manuscript was found on his drive after he'd died. A great swashbuckler! I predict another movie - but NOT with J. Depp.
blurt mundus vult decipi
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user wrote:
Pirate Latitudes by Michael Crichton

Amazing that this completed manuscript was found on his drive after he'd died. A great swashbuckler! I predict another movie - but NOT with J. Depp.

So that's how they're doing posthumous ghost writing these days. "We found it on his hard drive, honest!" ;)

Anyways, I'm presently reading Hardtack and Coffee: Soldier's Life in the Civil War by John D. Billings. He fought on the Union side and wrote the book in the early 1880's. Half the fun is the illustrations by Charles W. Reed.

Up next is Undaunted Courage by Stephen E. Ambrose. It's his take on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

The last book I finished was The Know-it-all by A. J. Jacobs. His writing is laugh out loud funny.
jkahless Custom Title
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And No Birds Sang - Farley Mowat

Full of Mowat's typical larger than life storytelling style, it tells of how he went from an idealistic teenager encouraged by his father to become a proper soldier for King and Country, to a battleworn and weary man.

In July of 1942, Mowat was an eager, idealistic infantry lieutenant barely out of his teens, bound for Europe on a troop ship and impatient to see action. This powerful true account of the action he saw, and against all odds survived, evokes the terrible reality of warfare with an honesty and clarity fiction can only imitate. Here is the agony and the antic humour, the tragedy and the tedium, the special camaraderie shared only by those who have fought a war. Here, too, is the impassioned anger of one soldier who discovers he can no longer accept the bloody carnage that engulfed him near the end of the Italian campaign: "I was staring down a vertiginous tunnel where all was black and bloody and the great wind of ultimate desolation howled and hungered. I was alone....relentlessly alone in a world I never knew....and no birds sang."

I just finished it yesterday, and felt myself moved to tears at the end. Makes me think of my grandfather, and what he must have gone through.
I just finished Dune, I'm not sure if I'd count Startide Rising as a recreational read as I'm doing it for a project.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I'm halfway thru The Hunger Games.
sturner Ancient Soldier
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jkahless wrote:
And No Birds Sang - Farley Mowat

Full of Mowat's typical larger than life storytelling style, it tells of how he went from an idealistic teenager encouraged by his father to become a proper soldier for King and Country, to a battleworn and weary man.

In July of 1942, Mowat was an eager, idealistic infantry lieutenant barely out of his teens, bound for Europe on a troop ship and impatient to see action. This powerful true account of the action he saw, and against all odds survived, evokes the terrible reality of warfare with an honesty and clarity fiction can only imitate. Here is the agony and the antic humour, the tragedy and the tedium, the special camaraderie shared only by those who have fought a war. Here, too, is the impassioned anger of one soldier who discovers he can no longer accept the bloody carnage that engulfed him near the end of the Italian campaign: "I was staring down a vertiginous tunnel where all was black and bloody and the great wind of ultimate desolation howled and hungered. I was alone....relentlessly alone in a world I never knew....and no birds sang."

I just finished it yesterday, and felt myself moved to tears at the end. Makes me think of my grandfather, and what he must have gone through.

Try "Blood Red Snow" and "Ivan's War". It's enough to make you very sober.

Then try to find something a little lighter, "Big Friend, Little Friend."
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I'm on the second book of the Hunger Games. It'll be done tonight or tomorrow. Then i'll have to find something to read while i wait until i can borrow the third book from the Kindle Lending Library.
user Stupid cockwomble
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The first three James Bond novels: Casino Royale, Live and Let Die and Moonraker. They're all in the same volume.

So he actually did get his balls paddled.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I finished the second and last books of the Hunger Games. I always get kinda bummed after finishing a series i really like.
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Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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