Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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justine Elitist Beer Lover
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I just finished reading I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali with Delphine Minoui.

Nujood is the youngest divorcee in the world. She was forced into a marriage at 9 or 10 by her father. Her husband forced himself on her after agreeing to wait until she came of age. He raped and beat her repeatedly. She found the courage to escape, and paved the way for other young girls like her. Sadly, the practice of marrying off girls as young as 7 continues in at least 6 other countries in addiction to her own Yemen.

It's a short book at only 176 pages, but i highly recommend it.
Geesie Couldn't hit it sideways
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I read a history of the construction of St Peter's last week.
I tried to pick up Mason & Dixon this week but my brain isn't really latching on to it after 12 hour shifts.
At the moment I'm about at the middle of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell which is an alternate history of Great Britain at the time of the Napoleonic Wars in which magic takes place as created by the two title characters. I think the author meant to mimic a style of English literature of that period (but I'm not an English major so this is only a guess). The first part of the book is somewhat stilted in that it is written with the assumption that the reader would have a schoolboy's knowledge of the history of magic in Britain up until the start of the book in 1808, so I'm sure that there are bits and pieces at the start of the novel that would make more sense to me now that I have that schoolboy's knowledge, partially supplied by the copious footnotes.

My paperback edition is 1006 pages so I expect to be at this book for a while (though I might pick up something a bit breezier in a couple of weeks if I haven't finished it by then). While it has won a number of science fiction/fantasy awards, I can only recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading alternate histories because this is particularly detailed.
I'm in the middle of Starting Grid to Chequered Flag by Paul Frere

It's an autobiographical account of Frere's racing career from his start in 1950 to 1960 when he won the Le Mans 24. What I find most interesting is the casualness of racing back then before it turned into a serious hundred million dollar business. Back then you could enter a Formula 1 grand prix because another driver recommended you, but now you'd have to be able to bring in millions in sponsorship money. It's a really old out of print copy that I only picked up because I read his other book Sports Car and Competition Driving.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I picked up a copy of "The Stainless Steel Rat Returns", but I haven't started it yet.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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I'm reading a wise man's fear it's book two in a series. It's good, but I really have to start reading books once the series is finished. I think I have about 10 on the go right now.
belloq451 in the outlet by the lightswitch.
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I'm about 3/4 of the way through Don Quixote.

After that's done, it's a toss-up between The City of God by St. Augustine, The Stand by Stephen King, and Consider Phlebas by Iain Banks.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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mmaverick wrote:
I'm reading a wise man's fear it's book two in a series. It's good, but I really have to start reading books once the series is finished. I think I have about 10 on the go right now.


That's something that's irritating me about Sci-Fi/Fantasy right now. It seems like everyone is writing serials, and I might run upon "Volume 4 of the Big Long Epic", and I'm like "so, where's V.1 ?"
And they aren't really put together in ways that you can easily discern the books that belong together. You might have to dig and hunt for the previous books, and in lots of stores (Walmart), you won't find them at all, because they don't keep "old" books, just the last couple of months print run.
jkahless Custom Title
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I'm reading Pattern Recognition by Gibson. I've got exams on the go right now though, so it's pretty slow going. Interesting book thus far.
Old Yoda agitator
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I'm reading A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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OldYoda wrote:
I'm reading A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

Are you having trouble sleeping? :)
Donkey Butter jerk face
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finished War and Peace about a month ago. Didn't like it as much as Anna Karenina. and I think I'm done with Tolstoy.

I just can't get the line form W&P out of my head. "Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides…" anyone else that read this book get that line stuck in your head?
Old Yoda agitator
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justine wrote:
OldYoda wrote:
I'm reading A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

Are you having trouble sleeping? :)

It is a fascinating revelation of how we got to where we are.

It is available on line here, chapter by chapter.
user Stupid cockwomble
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I've got People's History, too. I picked up a copy right after he died. Like most books right now, I've read a little then put it down meaning to get back to it later.

What I've read was very interesting and enlightening.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I cant read like I used to. My eyes get tired much sooner, and I end up putting the book aside. [/old guy rant]

Might be a good argument for e-books. Can you increase the font size on a Kindle ? (surely!)
Donkey Butter wrote:
finished War and Peace about a month ago. Didn't like it as much as Anna Karenina. and I think I'm done with Tolstoy.

I just can't get the line form W&P out of my head. "Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides…" anyone else that read this book get that line stuck in your head?



You mean Tolstoy's "War, What is it Good For"?
Not a fan.
Anna Karenina is the best fiction I've yet read.

I just finished Robert Ludlum's "Parsifal Mosaic".

I try to read a book a week.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke wrote:
I cant read like I used to. My eyes get tired much sooner, and I end up putting the book aside. [/old guy rant]

Might be a good argument for e-books. Can you increase the font size on a Kindle ? (surely!)

Yes, you can increase the font size.

"Adjustable Text Size
Kindle has eight adjustable font sizes to suit your reading preference. You can increase the text size of your favorite book or periodical with the push of a button. If your eyes tire, simply increase the font size and continue reading comfortably. Now every book in your library can be large print."
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Cool,

(I'd still prefer an iPad)
I have a bit of a backlog due to school and such. Among my unread items I own are Dragongirl by Todd McCaffrey (HC), Catacombs: A Tale of the Barque Cats by Anne McCaffrey & Elizabeth Ann Scarborough (HC), and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (Kindle). I also keep checking out and returning Catalyst: A Tale of the Barque Cats by Anne McCaffrey & Elizabeth Ann Scarborough (HC).

I don't have a Kindle but the Kindle Apps work fine.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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I like Anne McCaffrey.
I thought "The Crystal Singer" books were better than (what I read of ) the Dragonriders.
They were but she has not written anything I would've consider bad by any stretch. The Pern series is just a bit more complex than most people can track. 26 (soon to be 27) canonical novels (including those authored and co-authored by her son Todd), a several short stories in a number of anthology works, and 5 companion books and supplemental materials not authored by the McCaffrey's covering more than two millennia are a lot to digest.
One thing you might note about Anne McCaffrey is that in an interview many years ago she somewhat proudly noted that her input into her "co-"authored books was to make some changes in a book which was largely written by the other writer in a McCaffery-like style. I was very dismayed to hear that and it makes me wonder about most such co-authored books where there is a well-established and beloved author's name appearing above (and often in a much larger font than) his or her co-author's name like this for example:

Image
user Stupid cockwomble
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I never bother with those titles anymore.

Although Card did co-write a real good one about a sentient monkey.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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anybody read "The Gaea Trilogy" by John Varley ?
Ender bug hunter
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These are the books that I'm reading right now (I'm anywhere from a third to halfway through all of them):

A Game of Thrones
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
White Teeth
A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
Brain Rules
DukeofNuke wrote:
anybody read "The Gaea Trilogy" by John Varley ?

I did and enjoyed it immensely even though I had to wait years between the publications of Titan, Wizard and Demon.

I have picked up just about every title that Varley has published and at his best I think he is among the best SF writers (please note: I did not add "currently writing"). There might be some who will object to some unconventional ideas he has regarding sex--some of which appears in the Gaea Trilogy--so if this is a hot button issue for you then you should bypass this and any novels/story collections taking place in the Ophiuchi Hotline universe (which has nothing to do with the Gaea Trilogy). To be clear: these are the only writings of Varley where this might be a problem.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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A 50 foot tall Marilyn Monroe having sex with King Kong and immediately giving birth to a circus parade is "some unconventional ideas he has regarding sex" ...

Where'd you ever get that idea ?!

:D
DukeofNuke wrote:
A 50 foot tall Marilyn Monroe having sex with King Kong and immediately giving birth to a circus parade is "some unconventional ideas he has regarding sex" ...

Where'd you ever get that idea ?!

:D


Rule 34?

Err... I mean... What!?
In the past few months, I read Visit From the Goon Squad, Bangkok 8, The Lock Artist, Blackout & All Clear, LA Rex, Zero History, and a bunch of stuff like various works by Donald Davidson, John McDowell, Max Scheler, and Heidegger etc.

On the bed table now is Bangkok Tattoo, a psychology textbook on attention (the Attentive Brain), and works by Davidson and critical essays on Kierkegaard, and MG Piety/ Marylin Foley's latest, and a rough draft of a novel by a friend.
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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Everyone should read "Under The Roofs Of Paris", aka "Opus Pistorum" by Henry Miller.
dv
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I bought a Kindle. Spent some time on isohunt and am now reading a lot of things... a lot of a lot.

Today I read Tom Clancy's SSN, Stuff White People Like, and 1/2 of a book on body language. I'm now trying out Starship Titanic.
I am working my way through all 15 books of the Deverry cycle by Katharine Kerr, currently on number 11, The Fire Dragon. Brilliant series of fantasy novels in a pseudo-Celtic world where magic is real. I can whole heartedly recommend it to anyone who likes fantasy.

I'll be starting "A Dance with Dragons" as soon as I can get it on Tuesday :D
blurt mundus vult decipi
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I've been a non-fiction reader almost exclusively since childhood. An ex-girlfriend coaxed me into reading the works of Tom Robbins, and it has provided some insights into human nature.

In that spirit, I'm currently reading The Fort, by Bernard Cornwell. It's depressingly predictable. Military men would do such predictable things. I haven't finished it yet, though.
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke wrote:
Everyone should read "Under The Roofs Of Paris", aka "Opus Pistorum" by Henry Miller.

Why?
DukeofNuke FREE RADICAL
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justine wrote:
DukeofNuke wrote:
Everyone should read "Under The Roofs Of Paris", aka "Opus Pistorum" by Henry Miller.

Why?

Have you read it ? (I should have mentioned it is "Adults Only" )
It is a rare combination of literature by pornography. It's also a great party game.
Ask someone to open to any page and begin reading aloud . Embarrassment and hilarity ensues .
justine Elitist Beer Lover
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DukeofNuke wrote:
justine wrote:
DukeofNuke wrote:
Everyone should read "Under The Roofs Of Paris", aka "Opus Pistorum" by Henry Miller.

Why?

Have you read it ? (I should have mentioned it is "Adults Only" )
It is a rare combination of literature by pornography. It's also a great party game.
Ask someone to open to any page and begin reading aloud . Embarrassment and hilarity ensues .

I haven't read it. I wanted to know why you said everyone should. I'd never even heard of it, that's why i asked.
Alexander Supertramp this was uncalled for.
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I'm reading Those Guys Have All The Fun: Inside the World of ESPN by James Miller and Tom Shales.

It's an almost 800-page overly-detailed look at the history of ESPN, told mostly through interviews with the people involved. And it's awesome.
blurt mundus vult decipi
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DukeofNuke wrote:
justine wrote:
DukeofNuke wrote:
Everyone should read "Under The Roofs Of Paris", aka "Opus Pistorum" by Henry Miller.

Why?

Have you read it ? (I should have mentioned it is "Adults Only" )
It is a rare combination of literature by pornography. It's also a great party game.
Ask someone to open to any page and begin reading aloud . Embarrassment and hilarity ensues .

I'd like to go to one of your parties. I'd definitely bring the SO. She's shameless.
mmaverick my steady systematic decline
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I'm also listening to the Dresden books for the billionth time.
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Doing any recreational reading? v.5.8

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